Gifford Pinchot National Forest

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Gifford Pinchot National Forest
IUCN category VI (protected area with sustainable use of natural resources)
OldSnowy 15A.JPG
Old Snowy Mountain in Goat Rocks Wilderness
Map showing the location of Gifford Pinchot National Forest
LocationWashington, USA
Nearest cityAmboy, WA
Coordinates46°45′29″N 121°27′0″W / 46.75806°N 121.45°W / 46.75806; -121.45Coordinates: 46°45′29″N 121°27′0″W / 46.75806°N 121.45°W / 46.75806; -121.45
Area1,321,506 acres (5,347.95 km2)[1]
EstablishedJuly 1, 1908[2]
Visitors1,800,000 (in 2005)
Governing bodyU.S. Forest Service
Official website
 
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Gifford Pinchot National Forest
IUCN category VI (protected area with sustainable use of natural resources)
OldSnowy 15A.JPG
Old Snowy Mountain in Goat Rocks Wilderness
Map showing the location of Gifford Pinchot National Forest
LocationWashington, USA
Nearest cityAmboy, WA
Coordinates46°45′29″N 121°27′0″W / 46.75806°N 121.45°W / 46.75806; -121.45Coordinates: 46°45′29″N 121°27′0″W / 46.75806°N 121.45°W / 46.75806; -121.45
Area1,321,506 acres (5,347.95 km2)[1]
EstablishedJuly 1, 1908[2]
Visitors1,800,000 (in 2005)
Governing bodyU.S. Forest Service
Official website

Gifford Pinchot National Forest is a U.S. National Forest located in southern Washington, USA. With an area of 1.32 million acres (5300 km2), it extends 116 km along the western slopes of Cascade Range from Mount Rainier National Park to the Columbia River. It includes the 110,000 acre (445 km2) Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, established by Congress in 1982. In addition, Congressional action since 1964 has established the following wilderness areas:

A 1993 Forest Service study estimated that the extent of old growth in the Forest was 198,000 acres (80,000 ha),[6] some of which is contained within its wilderness areas.

The forest offices are located in Vancouver, Washington. There are local ranger district offices in Randle, Amboy, and Trout Lake.[7] The forest is named after the first chief of the United States Forest Service, Gifford Pinchot. Washington towns near entrances of the forest include Cougar, Randle, and Carson.

Contents

History

Gifford Pinchot National Forest is one of the older national forests in the United States. Included as part of the Mount Rainier Forest Reserve in 1897, the area was set aside as the Columbia National Forest in 1908. It was renamed the Gifford Pinchot National Forest on June 15, 1949.[8] In 1985 the non-profit Gifford Pinchot Task Force formed to protect the area. At 338 spots more than 6,000 culturally modified trees were identified, of which 3,000 are protected now.

The forest was named after Gifford Pinchot, one of the leading figures in the creation of the national forest system of the United States.

Geography

Gifford Pinchot National Forest is located in a mountainous region approximately between Mount St. Helens to the west, Mount Adams to the east, Mount Rainier National Park to the north, and the Columbia River to the south. This region of Southwest Washington is noted for its complex topography and volcanic geology. About 65 percent of the forest acreage is located in Skamania County. In descending order of land area the others are Lewis, Yakima, Cowlitz, Klickitat. counties.[9]

Fauna

The Gifford Pinchot National Forest is the native habitat for several threatened and endangered species. Local endangered species include the bald eagle and the spotted owl as well as multiple species of Northwest fish like the bull trout, chinook salmon, coho salmon and steelhead salmon.

See also

References

External links

Map of Gifford Pinchot National Forest