Germantown, Montgomery County, Maryland

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Germantown, Maryland
—  Census-designated place  —
Downtown Germantown, viewed from the intersection of Maryland Route 118 and Wisteria Drive, as it appeared in November 2007.
Nickname(s): G-Town[1]
Location of Germantown in the U.S. state of Maryland.
Coordinates: 39°11′0″N 77°16′0″W / 39.183333°N 77.266667°W / 39.183333; -77.266667Coordinates: 39°11′0″N 77°16′0″W / 39.183333°N 77.266667°W / 39.183333; -77.266667
Country United States of America
State Maryland
County Montgomery
Area
 • Total10.9 sq mi (28.0 km2)
 • Land10.8 sq mi (27.9 km2)
 • Water0.1 sq mi (0.1 km2)
Population (2010 United States Census)
 • Total86,395
 • Density7,900/sq mi (3,100/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code20874, 20875, 20876
Area code(s)301, 240
FIPS code
GNIS feature ID
 
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Germantown, Maryland
—  Census-designated place  —
Downtown Germantown, viewed from the intersection of Maryland Route 118 and Wisteria Drive, as it appeared in November 2007.
Nickname(s): G-Town[1]
Location of Germantown in the U.S. state of Maryland.
Coordinates: 39°11′0″N 77°16′0″W / 39.183333°N 77.266667°W / 39.183333; -77.266667Coordinates: 39°11′0″N 77°16′0″W / 39.183333°N 77.266667°W / 39.183333; -77.266667
Country United States of America
State Maryland
County Montgomery
Area
 • Total10.9 sq mi (28.0 km2)
 • Land10.8 sq mi (27.9 km2)
 • Water0.1 sq mi (0.1 km2)
Population (2010 United States Census)
 • Total86,395
 • Density7,900/sq mi (3,100/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code20874, 20875, 20876
Area code(s)301, 240
FIPS code
GNIS feature ID

Germantown is an urbanized census-designated place in Montgomery County, Maryland. With a population of 86,395 as of the 2010 United States Census, Germantown is the third most populous place in Maryland, after the city of Baltimore, and the census-designated place of Columbia, Maryland. Were Germantown to incorporate as a city, it would become the second largest incorporated city in Maryland.[2] Germantown is located approximately 25 miles (40 km) outside of the United States capital of Washington, D.C., and is an important part of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area.

Germantown is divided into six town sectors, referred to as villages. They are, Churchill Village, Gunners Lake Village, Clopper's Mill Village, Kingsview Village, Middlebrook Village, and Neelsville Village.[citation needed] The Churchill Town Sector at the corner of Maryland Route 118 and Middlebrook Road most closely resembles the center of Germantown, because of the location of the Up County Government Center, the library, the Black Rock Arts Center, the multiplex cinema, and the pedestrian shopping that features an array of restaurants. Three exits to I-270 are less than one mile away, the Maryland Area Regional Commuter train is within walking distance, and the Germantown Transit Center that provides Ride On shuttle service to the Shady Grove red line.

Germantown has the assigned ZIP codes of 20874 and 20876 for delivery and 20875 for post office boxes. It is the most populous Germantown in Maryland and is the only "Germantown, Maryland" recognized by the United States Postal Service, even though there is one in Anne Arundel County, one in Baltimore County, and one in Worcester County.[3]

Contents

History

Beginnings

In the 1830s and 1840s, the central business area was focused around the intersection of Liberty Mill Road and Clopper Road. Many of the business owners seemed to be German. Despite the fact that most of the local landowners and farmers were English, travelers remembering the accents of the shop-owners called the area Germantown, and the name stuck.

Assassination of Abraham Lincoln

On April 20, 1865, George Atzerodt, a co-conspirator in the Abraham Lincoln assassination, was captured in Germantown. He was assigned by John Wilkes Booth to assassinate Vice President Andrew Johnson, but lost his nerve and fled Washington, D.C., on the night of the Lincoln assassination. He was captured at his cousin Hartman Richter's farm in Germantown. Atzerodt was hanged on July 7, 1865 along with Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell, and David Herold in Washington, D.C.[4]

20th century

In January 1958, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission was relocated from its location in downtown Washington, D.C. to Germantown, which was considered far enough from the city to withstand a Soviet nuclear attack.[5] The facility now operates as an administration complex for the U.S. Department of Energy and headquarters for its Office of Biological and Environmental Research. During the 1970s, Wernher von Braun, a German rocket scientist who worked for Nazi Germany during World War II, worked for the aerospace company Fairchild Industries, which had offices in Germantown, as its Vice President for Engineering and Development. Von Braun worked at Fairchild Industries from July 1, 1972 until his death.

Economic growth

Since the early 1980s, Germantown has experienced rapid economic and population growth, both in townhouses and single-family dwellings, and an urbanized town center has been built.

2000s population boom

At the turn of the 21st century, Germantown had a population of 55,419, as of the 2000 United States Census. Ten years later, at the time of the 2010 United States Census, Germantown had experienced a 55.9% growth in population, growing from 55,419 to 86,395.

Government

The United States Department of Energy has its headquarters for the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in Germantown. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission was moved from its location in downtown Washington, D.C. to the present-day U.S. Department of Energy building in Germantown, due to fears of a Soviet nuclear attack on the U.S. capital. At the time, Germantown was believed to be far enough from Washington, D.C. to avoid the worst effects of a nuclear strike on the city. The facility now operates as an administration complex for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Business and finance

The Dutch biotechnology company, Qiagen, has offices in Germantown, along Maryland Route 118. Library Systems & Services has its headquarters in Germantown.[6] Earth Networks, Inc. (formerly known as AWS Convergence Technologies)/WeatherBug[7], Availink, Inc.[8], DRT[9], Hughes Network Systems, GE Aviation, Wabtec, and Proxy Aviation Systems[10], all have offices in Germantown.

Geography

Location of Germantown, Maryland

Germantown is located at 39°11′N 77°16′W / 39.183°N 77.267°W / 39.183; -77.267.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the community has a total area of 10.8 square miles (28.0 km²), of which, 10.8 square miles (27.9 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (0.46%) is water.

Climate

Climate data for Germantown
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)78
(26)
82
(28)
89
(32)
95
(35)
96
(36)
100
(38)
105
(41)
102
(39)
99
(37)
91
(33)
85
(29)
80
(27)
105
(41)
Average high °F (°C)40
(4)
44
(7)
53
(12)
65
(18)
73
(23)
81
(27)
85
(29)
83
(28)
76
(24)
65
(18)
55
(13)
44
(7)
64
(17.6)
Average low °F (°C)27
(−3)
29
(−2)
36
(2)
46
(8)
55
(13)
64
(18)
69
(21)
67
(19)
60
(16)
48
(9)
39
(4)
31
(−1)
47.6
(8.7)
Record low °F (°C)−13
(−25)
−12
(−24)
5
(−15)
18
(−8)
28
(−2)
35
(2)
38
(3)
39
(4)
28
(−2)
20
(−7)
10
(−12)
−1
(−18)
−13
(−25)
Precipitation inches (mm)2.88
(73.2)
2.81
(71.4)
3.61
(91.7)
3.22
(81.8)
4.13
(104.9)
3.49
(88.6)
3.67
(93.2)
2.90
(73.7)
3.83
(97.3)
3.29
(83.6)
3.53
(89.7)
3.00
(76.2)
40.36
(1,025.1)
Source: [11]

Demographics

Historical populations
CensusPop.
19809,721
199041,145323.3%
200055,41934.7%
201086,39555.9%
source:[12]

As of the census of 2010, there were 86,395 people, and 30,531 households residing in the area. The population density was 8,019 people per square mile (3,096.6/km²). The racial makeup of the area was 36.3% White, 21.8% African American, 0.2% Native American, 19.7% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.3% from other races, and 3.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 18.4% of the population.

There were 20,893 households out of which 41.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.8% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.4% were non-families. 23.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 1.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.19.

In the area, the population was spread out with 28.9% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 43.0% from 25 to 44, 17.3% from 45 to 64, and 3.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 94.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.6 males.

The median income for a household in the area was $76,061 as of a 2010 estimate.[13] Males had a median income of $46,039 versus $37,237 for females. The per capita income for the area was $26,709. 6.5% of the population and 3.5% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 5.9% are under the age of 18 and 9.9% are 65 or older.

Education

Public schools in Germantown are part of the Montgomery County Public Schools system.

Montgomery College, the largest higher education institution in Montgomery County, has a campus in Germantown.

Transportation

Germantown is bisected by Interstate 270 and has a station on the MARC train commuter service's Brunswick Line, which operates over CSX's Metropolitan Subdivision. The station building itself, at the corner of Liberty Mill Road and Mateny Hill Road, is a copy of the original 1891 structure designed by E. Francis Baldwin for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The current building was rebuilt after it was burned down by arson in 1978.

The Montgomery County public bus system, Ride On, serves Germantown with approximately 20 bus routes and operates a major transit hub in Germantown, known as the Germantown Transit Center. Also, a light rail system (the Corridor Cities Transitway) is under evaluation which would, when completed, connect the terminal of the Washington Metro Red Line at Shady Grove Station near Gaithersburg to Germantown and continue on northward to Clarksburg.

Culture

Music

The BlackRock Center for the Arts is located in the downtown Germantown, at the Germantown Town Center. The BlackRock Center for the Arts also sponsors the Germantown Oktoberfest, an annual festival held every year in the fall, which includes various genres of music, including traditional German folk, rock and pop.

Gina Schock, of the new wave band The Go-Go's, along with Mark Bryan and Dean Felber of the pop rock band Hootie and the Blowfish have lived in Germantown. The hard rock band, Clutch was formed in Germantown, and the pop singer Jason Malachi, pop singer, had also lived in Germantown.[14] The members of the rock band, Clutch, have attended Seneca Valley High School.

Sailors from the United States Navy Band perform at the BlackRock Center for the Arts in Germantown, Maryland, on August 1, 2009.
Sailors from the United States Navy Band perform at the BlackRock Center for the Arts in Germantown, Maryland, on August 1, 2009.

Sports

The Maryland SoccerPlex sports complex is located in Germantown, and served as the former home of the Washington Freedom, of the Women's Professional Soccer league. The team has since moved to Boca Raton and is now known as the magicJack].[15] Walter Johnson, a professional baseball pitcher for the Washington Senators lived in Germantown. Danny Heater, a high school basketball player and single game scoring record holder, lived in Germantown.[16] Bobby Worrest, a professional skateboarder, also lived from Germantown.[17]

In popular culture

Persons of note

References

  1. ^ "Urban Dictionary: G-Town". http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Germantown. Retrieved 30 May 2012. 
  2. ^ SAS Output
  3. ^ "Geographic Names Information System (GNIS): Germantown, Maryland". U.S. Geological Survey. http://geonames.usgs.gov. Retrieved February 22, 2012. 
  4. ^ Kauffman, M. (2004). American Brutus. pp. 282–284, Random House, ISBN 0-375-75974-3
  5. ^ Redirection Page | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)
  6. ^ "Contact Us." Library Systems & Services. Retrieved on September 27, 2010. "US Corporate Headquarters Library Systems & Services, LLC 12850 Middlebrook Road Suite 400 Germantown, MD 20874-5244."
  7. ^ Earth Networks > Contact Us
  8. ^ 中天联科-Availink
  9. ^ DRT, Inc
  10. ^ Proxy Aviation Systems
  11. ^ "Monthly Averages for Germantown, MD (20874)". Weather.com. http://www.weather.com/outlook/health/fitness/wxclimatology/monthly/20874. Retrieved November 9, 2011. 
  12. ^ "CENSUS OF POPULATION AND HOUSING (1790–2000)". U.S. Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/prod/www/abs/decennial/index.html. Retrieved July 17, 2010. 
  13. ^ [1]
  14. ^ "Germantown musician performs at rock hall of fame". The Gazette. July 7, 2010. http://ww2.gazette.net/stories/07072010/germnew192142_32553.php. Retrieved May 8, 2012. 
  15. ^ http://www.washingtonfreedom.com
  16. ^ "Danny Heater". West Virginia Humanities Council. http://www.wvencyclopedia.org/articles/351. Retrieved May 8, 2012. 
  17. ^ "Lords of D.C.-Town". Five O'Clock Publishing. http://www.ontaponline.com/view_article_full.php?article_id=9982. Retrieved May 8, 2012. 
  18. ^ http://www.xfroadrunners.com/transcripts/index.php?query=germantown&search_type=exact&Submit=Search&mode=search
  19. ^ "Fallout 3 Locations Planet Fallout Wiki". http://planetfallout.gamespy.com/wiki/Fallout_3_Locations#Fallout_3_Germantown_Police_Station. Retrieved 30 May 2012. 
  20. ^ Hendrix, Steve (October 13, 2009). "Germantown Mom Has an Insatiable Appetite for Competition". The Washington Post. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/10/12/AR2009101201339.html. Retrieved May 3, 2010. 

External links