Georgette Seabrooke

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Georgette Seabrooke
Archives of American Art - Georgette Seabrook - 2381 CROPPED.jpg
Seabrooke, 1939
Born(1916-08-02)August 2, 1916[1]
Charleston, South Carolina[1]
DiedDecember 27, 2011 "Georgette Seabrooke Powell". 
NationalityAmerican
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Georgette Seabrooke
Archives of American Art - Georgette Seabrook - 2381 CROPPED.jpg
Seabrooke, 1939
Born(1916-08-02)August 2, 1916[1]
Charleston, South Carolina[1]
DiedDecember 27, 2011 "Georgette Seabrooke Powell". 
NationalityAmerican

Georgette Seabrooke (aka Georgette Seabrooke Powell; August 2, 1916 – December 27, 2011), was an American muralist, artist, illustrator, art therapist, non-profit chief executive and educator.

Biography[edit]

Seabrooke was born in Charleston, South Carolina, and grew up in the New York City neighborhood of Yorkville, Manhattan. Her mother, widowed when Georgette was a child, was a domestic housekeeper, and Georgette started working with her mother. She graduated from Washington Irving High School.[2] She studied with James Lesesne Wells at the Harlem Art Workshop, and with Gwendolyn B. Bennett at the Harlem Community Art Center.[3]

In 1933, at the age of 17, she was admitted to the prestigious Cooper Union School of Art in New York, where she received a silver medal for painting.[4] While there she was chosen by the Federal Art Project of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) as one of four "master artists" to paint murals at Harlem Hospital. She was the youngest artist so chosen and the only female. The mural she painted, Recreation in Harlem, is nearly 20 feet long and depicts daily life in Harlem in the 1930s, including women chatting through a window and children performing in a choir. The hospital's management was not pleased with her depiction of an all-black Harlem community as they did not want to be known as a "Negro hospital." Seabrooke added eight white characters to the mural, but obscured their race in some cases and turned their face from the viewer in others. The controversy delayed Seabrooke's graduation from Cooper Union by a year.[5] Seabrooke also received a WPA commission to paint a mural at Queens General Hospital, now known as Queens Hospital Center, in Jamaica, Queens, New York.

In 2012, after being hidden from public view for many years and after surviving damage from a fire and being painted over, Recreation in Harlem and the other murals at Harlem Hospital were restored and placed on public view in the hospital's new Mural Pavilion.[6]

After Seabrooke got married and started a family with three children, she began illustrating calendars and magazines.

She went to Fordham University and studied theater design. Seabrooke moved to Washington, D.C. in 1959. She founded Operation Heritage Art Center, now known as Tomorrow's World Art Center, in 1970. In 1972 she became a registered art therapist, and the following year earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts from Howard University.[2] She was very active in combining art with mental-health therapy, teaching at the Tomorrow's World Art Center and at Malcolm X Park for the "Art in the Park" events.[3]

Works[edit]

Awards[edit]

Exhibits[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Georgette Powell Biography". The HistoryMakers. 2006-11-08. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  2. ^ a b Artworks This Week: Wednesday, November 22, 2006: Georgette Seabrooke Powell. - Maryland Public Television - November 22, 2006. - Retrieved: 2008-07-05
  3. ^ a b The Artists: Georgette Seabrooke - Harlem Hospital WPA Murals - Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University - Retrieved: 2014-04-12
  4. ^ "About Georgette Seabrooke Powell". The Powell Gallery. Retrieved 12 April 2014. 
  5. ^ "Historic WPA Mural in Harlem Restored". New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. Retrieved 12 April 2014. 
  6. ^ "At Harlem Hospital, Murals Get a New Life". New York Times. 16 September 2014. Retrieved 12 April 2014. 
  7. ^ "2008 Honors & Award Winners". American Art Therapy Association. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]