George Noory

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George Noory
BornGeorge Ralph Noory
(1950-06-04) June 4, 1950 (age 63)
Detroit, Michigan
NationalityAmerican
EducationUniversity of Detroit
OccupationTalk radio host
Known forCoast to Coast AM
 
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George Noory
BornGeorge Ralph Noory
(1950-06-04) June 4, 1950 (age 63)
Detroit, Michigan
NationalityAmerican
EducationUniversity of Detroit
OccupationTalk radio host
Known forCoast to Coast AM

George Ralph Noory (born June 4, 1950) is a radio talk show host. In January 2003, following Art Bell's retirement, Noory took over as weekday host of the late-night radio talk show Coast to Coast AM, having previously been a guest host for the show.[1] He also appears in the History Channel series Ancient Aliens and Beyond Belief (Gaiam TV).

Biography[edit]

Noory was born in Detroit to an Egyptian-born father and his American-born wife. Noory grew up in Dearborn Heights with two younger sisters as Roman Catholics of Lebanese descent.[1] He graduated from the University of Detroit in 1972 with a bachelor's degree in Communications, and took a position as an assignment desk editor in the news department of WJBK-TV. He also served 9 years as an officer in the United States Naval Reserve.[1] In 1996 he hosted a late-night program called Nighthawk.[1]

On-air style[edit]

In an article about Noory published in the magazine The Atlantic, Timothy Lavin wrote:

Noory can be an uneven broadcaster, sometimes seems to not pay full attention to his guests, offers strangely obvious commentary, and often lets clearly delusional or pseudoscientific assertions slide by without challenge.[2]

According to Media Life Magazine:

Noory says it doesn’t matter whether he believes what his callers and guests say. Ultimately, it's about entertainment, creating a show that people will be drawn to.[3]

Author and frequent Coast to Coast AM guest Whitley Strieber has commented on Noory's style, asserting:

It's not that he's credulous or easily led. He's willing to take these intellectual journeys. He'll have guests on that you think are completely off the wall -- nothing they're saying is real -- but by the end of the program you will have made a discovery that there is a kernel of a question worth exploring."[4]

Feud with Art Bell[edit]

Art Bell Started a short lived show Dark Matter on Sirius, which was ended due to Sirius inability to provide a reliable internet streaming service. Art Bell stated that the decision to come out of retirement was entirely his, a response to the direction that Noory has taken the show--closer to talk radio's political focus, than the open-minded exploration of the supernatural that defined Bell's tenure. Noory, Bell says, has "ruined" the franchise of Coast to Coast AM.[5]

Noory has previously stated that Art Bell was, "winding down"[6] On Thursday September 5, 2013 Noory had on David John Oates on Coast to Coast [7] a guest who was banned from the show by Art Bell. Bell sued David John Oates and Robert Stephens, of Montana, for "seeking to malign, harass, cyberstalk, defame, injure and annoy" Bell by calling him "crazy"--and worse.

It accuses Stephens of spreading rumor, on Oates' own radio show, that Bell was arrested on pornography-related charges. Additionally, the suit says several witnesses have reported hearing Oates accuse Bell of pedophilia. The accusations by Oates and Stephens were proven 100% false.[8]

After Bell and Sirius mutually agreed to end the Dark Matter Show on Sirius, George Noory's Coast to Coast swooped in and helped fill part of the time slot vacated by Art Bell on the Sirius Indie Channel.

In response to George Noory thanking him everynight at the end of a broadcase Art Bell stated, "As for thinking George is a nice guy, those days are long gone. He should feel the sharp knife of hypocrisy stab him every night when he "thanks me", I told him what a piece of crap he was after he put Oates on in language that would make most Sirius/XM Hosts blush, still he does it either because he has been told to do it or he really (loathes) me, I prefer the former".[9]

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