George Grant (author)

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For other people named George Grant, see George Grant (disambiguation).

George Grant (born in Houston, Texas in 1954) is an evangelical writer and a Presbyterian Church in America (PCA) pastor.

He was a church planter and pastor in Texas for ten years. He then served as an assistant to D. James Kennedy at the Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church and taught at Knox Theological Seminary.[1] Following his move to Tennessee in 1991, Grant founded the King’s Meadow Study Center and Franklin Classical School in Franklin.[2] He is the author of more than 60 books and hundreds of articles.[3] He is currently involved in church planting in Middle Tennessee and serves as the pastor of Parish Presbyterian Church in Franklin, Tennessee.

Family[edit]

Grant lives near Franklin with his wife and co-author Karen. They have three grown children and three grandchildren.

Education[edit]

Grant has degrees from the University of Houston, Whitefield Theological Seminary, Belhaven College and Knox Theological Seminary.[4]

Beliefs[edit]

Grant holds to the standards of the Westminster Confession and looks to Francis Schaeffer (1912–1984), founder of L'Abri in Switzerland, and Thomas Chalmers (1780–1847), founder of New College Edinburgh, as his chief spiritual and intellectual influences. He has also been profoundly influenced by Martin Bucer (1491–1551), Jan Amos Comenius (1592–1670), Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834–1892), Abraham Kuyper (1837–1920), G.K. Chesterton (1874–1936), J.R.R. Tolkien (1892–1973), and C.S. Lewis (1898–1963). In recent years, he has closely associated himself and his writing with the Ligonier Ministries of R.C. Sproul (b. 1939).

Published books[edit]

Author or Co-Author[edit]

Editor[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dr. George Grant Promotes Christian Doctrine in Education" June 07, 2004, The Christian Post
  2. ^ King’s Meadow Study Center web site
  3. ^ List of Grant's wrok at Library Thing.com
  4. ^ "Leadership". Parish Presbyterian Church. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 

External links[edit]