Gengo

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Gengo
TypeLanguage Translation via crowdsourcing
IndustryTranslation
Founded2008
Founder(s)Robert Laing and Matthew Romaine
HeadquartersTokyo, Japan and San Mateo, California
ServicesTranslation, API
Websitehttp://www.gengo.com/
 
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Gengo
TypeLanguage Translation via crowdsourcing
IndustryTranslation
Founded2008
Founder(s)Robert Laing and Matthew Romaine
HeadquartersTokyo, Japan and San Mateo, California
ServicesTranslation, API
Websitehttp://www.gengo.com/

Gengo is a web-based human translation platform headquartered in Tokyo. The platform currently draws from a network of approximately 9,000 pre-tested translators working across 34 languages. Translations can be ordered via direct order or API integration. The company name, "Gengo," comes from the Japanese word for "language."[1]

Services[edit]

Users can order translations through Gengo's direct order form or API.[2] Gengo’s API was launched in April 2010. It allows developers to integrate Gengo’s translation platform into third-party applications or web sites and is aimed at the translation of dynamic content such as blog posts and product descriptions on e-commerce sites.[3] The API is integrated with services such as YouTube and Drupal.

History[edit]

Gengo was founded in 2008 by Matthew Romaine and Robert Laing. Prior to starting Gengo, Matthew was an audio research engineer and translator with Sony Corporation, and Robert headed Moresided, a UK-based design agency. Prior to its early 2012 rebranding, the company was known as "myGengo."[4]

Gengo's translation platform is supported by a worldwide team of translators.

Funding[edit]

The company's initial $750,000 seed investment round concluded in September 2010. Investors included Dave McClure of 500 Startups, last.fm founder Felix Miller, Delicious founder Joshua Schachter, Brian Nelson (CEO at Japan-based ValueCommerce), Pageflakes co-founder Christoph Janz, Benjamin Joffe (CEO at China-based Plus Eight Star), and a number of Japanese angel investors. This was followed by a further seed funding round of around $1,000,000 in mid-2011.

A $5.25 million Series A round led by Atomico and joined by 500 Startups ended in September 2011, followed by an early 2013 Series B investment of $12 million led by Intel Capital.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1] "My Gengo Offers Fast, Reliable (And Low Cost!) Language Translation," SF NewTech, October 18, 2010.
  2. ^ [2] "Gengo is Mechanical Turk for Translations," TechCrunch, January 11, 2010.
  3. ^ [3] "Gengo's New API Let's You Plug Human Translation into Websites and Apps", April 29, 2010.
  4. ^ http://robertlaing.com/2012/12/30/rebranding-your-startup/
  5. ^ [5] "Gengo Raises $12MM, led by Intel Capital," Gengo blog, April 23, 2013.

External links[edit]