Gene Sperling

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Gene Sperling
Sperling at the Financial Times View from the Top conference (2011)
Director of the National Economic Council
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 20, 2011
PresidentBarack Obama
Preceded byLawrence Summers
In office
December 1996 – 2000
PresidentBill Clinton
Preceded byLaura Tyson
Succeeded byLawrence Lindsey
Personal details
Born(1958-12-24) December 24, 1958 (age 53)
Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic Party
Alma materUniversity of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Yale University
University of Pennsylvania
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Gene Sperling
Sperling at the Financial Times View from the Top conference (2011)
Director of the National Economic Council
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 20, 2011
PresidentBarack Obama
Preceded byLawrence Summers
In office
December 1996 – 2000
PresidentBill Clinton
Preceded byLaura Tyson
Succeeded byLawrence Lindsey
Personal details
Born(1958-12-24) December 24, 1958 (age 53)
Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic Party
Alma materUniversity of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Yale University
University of Pennsylvania

Gene B. Sperling (born December 24, 1958) is an American lawyer and political figure,[1] currently serving as Director of the National Economic Council under President Obama.[2]

Contents

Life and career

Sperling was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he attended the alternative Community High School. He received a B.A. in political science from the University of Minnesota, a J.D. from Yale Law School, and attended The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. In the 1990s Gene Sperling worked for New York Governor Mario Cuomo.

During Bill Clinton's first term as President, from 1993–1996, Sperling served as deputy director of the National Economic Council while the Council was directed by Robert Rubin, who was promoted to Treasury Secretary. Sperling became National Economic Adviser to Clinton and director of the National Economic Council from 1996 to 2000.

As director of the NEC, Sperling, who had played a key role in the 1993 Deficit Reduction Act, was a key negotiator of the 1997 bipartisan Balanced Budget Act.[3] Sperling was also a principal negotiator with then-Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers of the Financial Modernization Act of 1999, also known as the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. Gramm-Leach-Bliley repealed large portions of the depression-era Glass-Stegall Act allowing banks, securities firms and insurance companies to merge.[4] President Barack Obama believes that the repeal of Glass–Steagall helped cause the 2007 subprime mortgage financial crisis.[5]

Also in 1999, together with United States Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky, Sperling successfully negotiated and concluded the China-World Trade Organization agreement in Beijing, paving the way for China to enter the WTO in 2001.[6]

Sperling was the chief economic advisor for Hillary Clinton during her presidential campaign.[7][8]

Sperling was also on the staff of the Council on Foreign Relations, where he founded and served as director of the Center for Universal Education—an organization focused on ensuring quality, universal education for the world’s poorest children.[9]

According to Bloomberg News, Sperling earned $887,727 from Goldman Sachs in 2008 for advice on its charitable giving and $158,000 for speeches mostly to financial companies.[10]

Sperling is the author of The Pro-Growth Progressive, a book arguing that liberals should seek to harness market forces in pursuing progressive goals, and co-author of What Works In Girls' Education?. He was also a consultant for the television series The West Wing.

From 2009 to 2011, Sperling served as a counselor to Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, advising on fiscal, budget, tax, job creation and small business issues.[11]

In January 2011, President Barack Obama appointed Sperling as the director of the National Economic Council.

Important H1B Visa Power Broker

In the history of the H-1B program, few people have played a role as important as that of Gene Sperling, who was appointed by President Obama to head the National Economic Council.[12]

Works

References

  1. ^ Montgomery, Lori; Dennis, Brady (January 7, 2011). "Obama names Sperling to head National Economic Council". Washington Post. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/07/AR2011010701653.html. "Sperling is not an economist by training, he is valued as a savvy political strategist with proven ability to extract victories on fiscal issues from a hostile Congress."
  2. ^ CNN.com: Volcker stepping down from White House advisory post
  3. ^ The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, [1], January 7, 2011.
  4. ^ National Economic Council, Profile of Gene Sperling
  5. ^ Wall Street Journal, Ten Questions for Those Fixing the Financial Mess, March 10, 2009.
  6. ^ National Economic Council, Profile of Gene Sperling
  7. ^ A look at the Clinton economic plan , Kai Ryssdal interviews Gene Sperling, Marketplace, January 31, 2008
  8. ^ The Advisers Are Writing Our Future David Leonhardt, The New York Times, April 18, 2007.
  9. ^ Council on Foreign Relations, [2].
  10. ^ Bloomberg News, Geithner Aides Reaped Millions Working for Banks, Hedge Funds, October 14, 2009.
  11. ^ National Economic Council,[3].
  12. ^ http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9204338/Obama_appointee_Sperling_was_key_H_1B_broker_?source=toc "Obama appointee Sperling was key H-1B broker"

External links

Political offices
Preceded by
Laura Tyson
Director of the National Economic Council
1996–2000
Succeeded by
Lawrence Lindsey
Preceded by
Lawrence Summers
Director of the National Economic Council
2011–present
Incumbent