Gary Wilson (snooker player)

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Gary Wilson
Born(1985-08-11) 11 August 1985 (age 28)
Wallsend, England
Sport country England
Professional2003–2006, 2013–
Highest ranking76 (May 2006)[1]
Current ranking92 (as of 19 October 2013)
Highest break135 (2012 Scottish Open (ET5), 2013 Indian Open)
Best ranking finishLast 16 (2013 Indian Open)
Tournament wins
Non-ranking1
 
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Gary Wilson
Born(1985-08-11) 11 August 1985 (age 28)
Wallsend, England
Sport country England
Professional2003–2006, 2013–
Highest ranking76 (May 2006)[1]
Current ranking92 (as of 19 October 2013)
Highest break135 (2012 Scottish Open (ET5), 2013 Indian Open)
Best ranking finishLast 16 (2013 Indian Open)
Tournament wins
Non-ranking1

Gary Wilson (born 11 August 1985) is an English professional snooker player from Wallsend in the North Tyneside, Tyne and Wear.

Career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Wilson started playing snooker aged three and soon started showing promise.[2] At the age of 8 he had already been put into a team performing in the local league, despite some clubs refusing to allow a kid to play. Aged 9, he made his first century, and appeared for the first time at the BBC1's snooker game show series Junior Big Break: Stars of the Future (he would made two more appearances at the show). He played exhibition matches with John Parrott and Willie Thorne and defeated Jimmy White and Ronnie O'Sullivan in level matches. Wilson went on to win a number of national titles, including the UK Under-18 championship twice, and was widely regarded as one of the most promising junior players in the country.[3]

in 2003 Wilson made his international debut in at the European U-19′s Championship in Latvia. The same year he started his professional career by playing Challenge Tour, the second-level professional tour at the time, and won the fourth event in 2004 to finish fourth in the rankings and secure his place on the main tour for 2004/2005 season.[4] Wilson's biggest achievement that year however was the victory at the World Under-21 Snooker Championship in Ireland. Having won all seven of his round robin matches, dropping just two frames along the way, he then went all the way to the final, defeating the likes of Pankaj Advani, Aditya Mehta and Liang Wenbo. In the final Wilson saw off Kobkit Palajin with top breaks of 142 and 135 to win 11-5.

In his debut season Wilson reached the last 48 of the Irish Masters and last 64 of the China Open.[5] These results were just enough to ensure that he would remain on tour for another year. The next season, Wilson twice reached the last 64 stage of the tournaments, however the rest of his performances was unsuccessful and following defeat to James Tatton in the World Championship qualifying he fell off the tour.[6] In 2013 Wilson commented: "At the end of it, when you looked at the rankings it was only by one match and I was gutted. The thing is, at the time, and this is not an excuse, the game was nowhere near as popular as now. It was going through a really bad patch and there were only six tournaments in all compared to now when there are 20-25 tournaments per season. It meant if you had two bad tournaments and you were not doing too well you did not have much time to recover. It is so different now."[2]

Amateur years and return to main tour[edit]

Wilson was to spend the next four years attempting to regain his tour place via the PIOS tour, having come close to finish inside the top 8 on several occasions. He was forced to start working as a taxi driver at the time to make a living.[2]

Following the introduction of the Q School Wilson again came close to turning pro, twice reaching the fourth round in 2011 and once in 2012. He also took part in the 2012 IBSF World Championship in Bulgaria, having finished top of the English amateur rankings. He reached the final but lost 8-10 to Muhammad Asif. During the 2011/2012 season Wilson entered a number of PTC events, defeating the likes of Peter Ebdon and Marco Fu and reaching the last 32 twice. The next season was even better, as he performed consistently and reached the last 16 of Scottish Open; as a result he finished third among the amateur players on the Order of Merit and finally regained his tour place after seven years.[7] Wilson said, "I knew if I went quite far in that last event I would be able to turn professional off that, so losing the world amateur final did not end my dreams".[2]

2013/2014[edit]

Wilson had a fairly strong start to his comeback season. In the first tournament, the Wuxi Classic, he defeated James Wattana to qualify for his second ever venue appearance; there he would lose the decider to David Morris. He also performed successfully at the PTC events, having reached the last 32 of the Bulgarian Open before making his first ever semi-final appearance at the Rotterdam Open; in the semi-final match he was leading eventual tournament winner Mark Williams 3-1 but lost 3-4.

Tournament wins[edit]

Non-ranking wins[edit]

Amateur[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Official Rankings". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 15 June 2006. Retrieved 23 July 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Wilson is hoping for a big break second time around". Chronicle Live. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "Snooker: Cue king Gary has world at his feet". The Journal. 31 August 2004. Retrieved 29 July 2013. 
  4. ^ "Gary Wilson - Season 2003/2004". Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  5. ^ "Gary Wilson - Season 2004/2005". Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  6. ^ "Gary Wilson - Season 2005/2006". Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  7. ^ "Order of Merit". WWW Snooker. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 

External links[edit]