Gary Dornhoefer

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Gary Dornhoefer
Born(1943-02-02) February 2, 1943 (age 71)
Kitchener, ON, CAN
Height6 ft 1 in (185 cm)
Weight175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
PositionRight Wing
ShotRight
Played forBoston Bruins
Philadelphia Flyers
Playing career1963–1978
 
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Gary Dornhoefer
Born(1943-02-02) February 2, 1943 (age 71)
Kitchener, ON, CAN
Height6 ft 1 in (185 cm)
Weight175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
PositionRight Wing
ShotRight
Played forBoston Bruins
Philadelphia Flyers
Playing career1963–1978

Gerhardt Otto Dornhofer (born February 2, 1943), better known as Gary Dornhoefer, is a Canadian former professional ice hockey right winger who played 14 seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) for the Boston Bruins and Philadelphia Flyers. He was a member of the Flyers' back-to-back Stanley Cup championship teams in 1974 and 1975.

Playing career[edit]

After playing his junior hockey with the Niagara Falls Flyers of the Ontario Hockey Association, Dornhoefer made his NHL debut with the Boston Bruins in the 1964 season, playing in 32 games, scoring twelve goals and ten assists. After that promising start, he was little used by Boston thereafter and spent most of the next three seasons in the minor leagues, principally with the Hershey Bears of the American Hockey League.

Philadelphia Flyers[edit]

Dornhoefer was left unprotected in the 1967 NHL Expansion Draft. The Philadelphia Flyers selected him with the 13th pick overall, and he would never play with another team.

Statue depicting Dornhoefer's overtime goal during the 1973 Stanley Cup playoffs.

In that first year with Philadelphia, Dornhoefer scored 13 goals and 43 points while accumulating 134 penalty minutes and gaining a reputation as a hard hitting, grinding left winger with a touch for scoring. Two seasons later he reached the 20-goal plateau for the first time, a mark he would achieve in five seasons. In 1973 he had his best season, scoring 30 goals and 49 assists for 79 points and being named to play in the All-Star Game. The most famous play of his career came in the 1973 Stanley Cup playoffs when he scored a crucial overtime goal against the Minnesota North Stars on a solo rush. The goal was memorialized on a statue at the Spectrum, which was demolished in 2010-11. Plans are for the Spectrum statues to be installed in a new retail, restaurant and entertainment complex to be built on a nearby site.[1]

Although hampered by injuries throughout his career in consequence of his bruising style, Dornhoefer remained an effective scorer through his penultimate season, and was named to play in the All-Star Game again in 1977 after finishing the regular season with a +47 plus/minus mark. The season thereafter, missing nearly half the season through injury, his scoring touch disappeared completely, and he retired after the 1978 playoffs.

Dornhoefer played in 787 games over 14 seasons, scoring 214 goals and 328 assists for 542 points, adding 1291 penalty minutes. At the time of his retirement he was second only to Bobby Clarke as the team's all time leading scorer, and still ranks tenth in that category. His eleven seasons with Philadelphia are surpassed only by Clarke, Bill Barber and Rick MacLeish, and on a team iconic for its brawling ways, Dornhoefer is eighth in franchise penalty minutes.

Retirement[edit]

After his retirement following the 1977–1978 season, Dornhoefer moved to broadcasting. He worked a short time in Philadelphia locally, then moved back to his native Ontario, Canada to work on Hockey Night In Canada as a color commentator from 1978 – 1986. After a six year hiatus from broadcasting, Dornhoefer moved back to Philadelphia in 1992 and joined the Flyers broadcast team, originally working with play-by-play man Gene Hart. He served as a Flyers' color analyst through the 2005–06 NHL season and is now one of the team's Ambassadors of Hockey.

Career statistics[edit]

  Regular season Playoffs
SeasonTeamLeagueGPGAPtsPIMGPGAPtsPIM
1961–62Niagara Falls FlyersOHA5083139121623515
1962–63Niagara Falls FlyersOHA38163450581611132456
1962–63Niagara Falls FlyersM-Cup —923533
1963–64Boston BruinsNHL3212102220
1963–64Minneapolis BruinsCPHL3921305167
1964–65Boston BruinsNHL2001113
1964–65San Francisco SealsWHL3710253559
1965–66Boston BruinsNHL100112
1965–66Hershey BearsAHL5416203656311214
1966–67Hershey BearsAHL7119224111050117
1967–68Philadelphia FlyersNHL65133043134300015
1968–69Philadelphia FlyersNHL608162480401120
1969–70Philadelphia FlyersNHL6526295596
1970–71Philadelphia FlyersNHL572020409320004
1971–72Philadelphia FlyersNHL75173249183
1972–73Philadelphia FlyersNHL773049791681133616
1973–74Philadelphia FlyersNHL5711395012514561143
1974–75Philadelphia FlyersNHL6917274410217551033
1975–76Philadelphia FlyersNHL742835631281634743
1976–77Philadelphia FlyersNHL7925345985910122
1977–78Philadelphia FlyersNHL4775126240007
NHL totals787214328542129180171936203

References[edit]

  1. ^ Caldwell, Dave (April 27, 2010). "The Spectrum Still Has a Hold". The New York Times. Retrieved July 10, 2011. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Bill Clement
Philadelphia Flyers TV Color Commentator
1992–2006
Succeeded by
Steve Coates
Keith Jones