Gary Cohen

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Gary Cohen
Gary Cohen 2009.jpg
Cohen in 2009
Born(1958-04-29) April 29, 1958 (age 56)
Queens, New York
NationalityAmerican
EducationColumbia University, '81
B.S., Political Science
OccupationNew York Mets play-by-play announcer
Years active1983–present
Spouse(s)Lynn Cohen
Children5
 
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For other people named Gary Cohen, see Gary Cohen (disambiguation).
Gary Cohen
Gary Cohen 2009.jpg
Cohen in 2009
Born(1958-04-29) April 29, 1958 (age 56)
Queens, New York
NationalityAmerican
EducationColumbia University, '81
B.S., Political Science
OccupationNew York Mets play-by-play announcer
Years active1983–present
Spouse(s)Lynn Cohen
Children5

Gary Cohen (born April 29, 1958, in Queens, New York) is an American sportscaster, best known as a radio and television play-by-play announcer for the New York Mets of Major League Baseball.

Career[edit]

Cohen graduated with a political science degree in 1981 from Columbia University, where he began his broadcasting career with WKCR Sports. While at Columbia, he announced soccer games with future presidential adviser and Good Morning America host George Stephanopoulos.[1]

Prior to joining the Mets' broadcast team in 1989, Cohen worked as the voice of the minor league Spartanburg Spinners (1983–1984), Durham Bulls (1986), and Pawtucket Red Sox (1987–1988).[2] He also called ice hockey and basketball games for Providence College from 1988 to 1989, and football for Brown University in 1987.[2] Along with his work with the Mets, Cohen has also called postseason MLB games for ESPN Radio and CBS Radio.[2]

In addition to his baseball duties, Cohen has called men's college basketball games for many years, starting with his duties with St. John's on WFAN, whom he broadcast from 1995 to 2002.[2] Following WFAN's loss of the radio rights to St. John's games, Cohen began broadcasting Seton Hall on WABC, which he continues to do to this day. He also served as a backup announcer on New York Rangers radio broadcasts, called Olympic hockey at the 1992, 1994, and 1998 Winter Olympics, and NCAA tournament games for Westwood One on multiple occasions.[2]

Cohen has called many great moments in Mets history, such as Todd Pratt's walk off home run in Game 4 the 1999 NLDS that won the Mets the series, Robin Ventura's "grand slam single" in Game 5 of the 1999 NLCS, Benny Agbayani's walk off home run in Game 3 of the 2000 NLDS, the Mets winning the 2000 NLCS to advance to the World Series, Endy Chavez's home run robbing catch in Game 7 of the 2006 NLCS, and Johan Santana's no-hitter on June 1, 2012, the first in Mets history.

Radio[edit]

Cohen's signature radio phrases, which he has carried over to television, include:

He is known for his vivid and succinct description of the game action, his smooth baritone voice, corny joking with former broadcast partner Howie Rose, and his sometimes biting, but always well-informed baseball commentary. In 2003, Cohen became the Mets' lead radio voice following the retirement of Bob Murphy.

In October 2006, during the Mets' postseason run, Cohen returned to the WFAN booth with Rose and newcomer Tom McCarthy for a couple of innings each game; he was behind the microphone for Endy Chávez's miraculous catch in Game 7 of the NLCS which the Mets lost.

Television[edit]

It was announced on November 9, 2005, that Cohen would become the play-by-play announcer for the new Mets cable television network, SportsNet New York (SNY). As part of the agreement, Cohen also calls about 25 Mets games per year on WPIX along with analysts (and former Mets) Ron Darling and Keith Hernandez.

On June 1, 2012, Cohen called the first no-hitter in Mets history, thrown by Johan Santana.

Because of their popularity, Lynn Cohen, Gary's wife, along with Gary and Keith and Ron have created a website www.pitchinforagoodcause.org where the net profits from the merchandise sold by the website goes to different charities.

Personal life[edit]

Cohen is married to Lynn Cohen and has five children.[3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Koblin, John (July 15, 2009). "The Anti-Homers". The New York Observer. Retrieved 2011-11-27. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "Gary Cohen". newyork.mets.mlb.com. Retrieved 2 August 2012. 
  3. ^ "SNY.tv: sny_announcers: Mets On-Air Talent". Retrieved 2009-08-04. 

External links[edit]