Gary Beauchamp

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Gary K. Beauchamp
ResidencePennsylvania
FieldsBiologist, Geneticist
InstitutionsMonell Chemical Senses Center
Alma materUniversity of Chicago
Notable awardsMax Mozell Award, 1999
Sense of Smell Award, 1998
 
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Gary K. Beauchamp
ResidencePennsylvania
FieldsBiologist, Geneticist
InstitutionsMonell Chemical Senses Center
Alma materUniversity of Chicago
Notable awardsMax Mozell Award, 1999
Sense of Smell Award, 1998

Dr. Gary K. Beauchamp has been Director and President of the Monell Chemical Senses Center since 1990.

Dr. Beauchamp graduated from Carleton College in 1965 with a bachelor’s degree in biology. He received his Ph.D. in biopsychology in 1971 from The Pritzker School of Medicine of the University of Chicago. He joined the newly established Monell Center as a postdoctoral fellow in 1971, was appointed to the faculty in 1973, and attained the rank of Member in 1981.

Dr. Beauchamp maintains an active research program at Monell, exploring varied topics related to taste, olfaction, and chemesthesis. Trained as a psychobiologist, his research has contributed to advancements in the fields of developmental psychology, physiological psychology, and perception; he also has made important contributions to the fields of genetics, developmental biology, immunobiology, ethology, and molecular biology.

Considered one of the world’s leading experts on chemosensory science,[1] Dr. Beauchamp serves as a scientific advisor to numerous governmental and private organizations, including the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and Institute of Medicine.

In 2009–2010 Dr. Beauchamp served on the Institute of Medicine Committee on Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake in the United States, and after the release of the committee's report,[2] spoke widely about its recommendations.[3]

Gary Beauchamp is the father-in-law of Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Quiara Alegría Hudes

Select publications[edit]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Mossop, Brian (2011-07-13). "Can We Be Trained to Like Healthy Foods?". Scientific American. 
  2. ^ Committee on Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake, Institute of Medicine, Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake in the United States, Jane E. Henry and Christine L. Taylor, Eds. 2010.
  3. ^ A summary of the report's recommendations can be found in "Sodium Intake Among Adults – United States, 2005−2006", Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) 59: 24 ( June 25, 2010): 746-49, published by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.