GE Evolution Series

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GE Evolution Series
Union Pacific 5304.jpg
Three of Union Pacific Railroad's Evolution Series locomotives leaving Hutchinson, Kansas with AC45CCTE #5304 in the lead.
Type and origin
Power typeDiesel-electric
BuilderGeneral Electric Transportation
Specifications
AAR wheel arr.C-C (ES40DC, ES44DC,[1] ES44AC,[2] ES58ACi, ES59ACi)
A1A-A1A (ES44C4[3])
Gauge4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
1,520 mm (4 ft 11 2732 in) Kazakhstan
5 ft 3 in (1,600 mm) Brazil
1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in) Pakistan
Length73 ft 2 in (22.30 m)
Fuel capacity5,000 US gal (18,900 l; 4,160 imp gal) (ES40AC, ES44DC, ES44AC, ES44C4)
Prime moverGEVO
Engine type4-stroke diesel engine
CylindersV12 (ES40DC, ES44DC,[1] ES44AC,[2] ES44C4[3])
V16 (ES58ACi, ES59ACi)
Performance figures
Power output4,000 hp (2,980 kW) (ES40DC)
4,400 hp (3,280 kW) (ES44DC, ES44AC, ES44C4)
6,200 hp (4,620 kW) (ES58ACi, ES59ACi)
Career
Operator(s)UP, BNSF, CSX, NS, CN, CP, KCS, KCSM, GECX, FXE, IAIS, SVTX, CREX, FEC
NicknamesGEVO, roarer
Dispositionalmost all (only ones retired have been in crashes) still in service as of 2013
 
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GE Evolution Series
Union Pacific 5304.jpg
Three of Union Pacific Railroad's Evolution Series locomotives leaving Hutchinson, Kansas with AC45CCTE #5304 in the lead.
Type and origin
Power typeDiesel-electric
BuilderGeneral Electric Transportation
Specifications
AAR wheel arr.C-C (ES40DC, ES44DC,[1] ES44AC,[2] ES58ACi, ES59ACi)
A1A-A1A (ES44C4[3])
Gauge4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
1,520 mm (4 ft 11 2732 in) Kazakhstan
5 ft 3 in (1,600 mm) Brazil
1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in) Pakistan
Length73 ft 2 in (22.30 m)
Fuel capacity5,000 US gal (18,900 l; 4,160 imp gal) (ES40AC, ES44DC, ES44AC, ES44C4)
Prime moverGEVO
Engine type4-stroke diesel engine
CylindersV12 (ES40DC, ES44DC,[1] ES44AC,[2] ES44C4[3])
V16 (ES58ACi, ES59ACi)
Performance figures
Power output4,000 hp (2,980 kW) (ES40DC)
4,400 hp (3,280 kW) (ES44DC, ES44AC, ES44C4)
6,200 hp (4,620 kW) (ES58ACi, ES59ACi)
Career
Operator(s)UP, BNSF, CSX, NS, CN, CP, KCS, KCSM, GECX, FXE, IAIS, SVTX, CREX, FEC
NicknamesGEVO, roarer
Dispositionalmost all (only ones retired have been in crashes) still in service as of 2013

The Evolution Series is a line of diesel locomotives built by GE Transportation Systems, designed to meet the U.S. EPA's Tier 2 locomotive emissions standards that took effect in 2005. The first pre-production units were built in 2003. Evolution Series locomotives are equipped with either AC or DC traction motors, depending on the customer's preference. All are powered by the GE GEVO engine.[4]

The Evolution Series was named as one of the "10 Locomotives That Changed Railroading" by industry publication Trains Magazine.[5] It was the only locomotive introduced after 1972 to be included in that list.[5]

Models[edit]

Currently, four different Evolution Series models have been produced for the North American market. They are all six axle locomotives and have the wheel arrangement C-C (AAR classification) or Co'Co' (UIC classification), except for the ES44C4 which has an A1A-A1A wheel arrangement. All North American Evolution Series locomotives are equipped from the factory with a Nathan-Airchime K5HL-R2 "Evolution" airhorn, and most later models are equipped with a Graham-White 373 (electronic) E-BELL.

ES40DC[edit]

The ES40DC (Evolution Series, 4000 HP, DC traction) replaces the Dash 9-40CW model in GE's range and, like the former model, has been delivered exclusively to Norfolk Southern Railway. ES44DC's owned by CSX Transportation have also been given this designation after being de-rated to 4,000 hp (3,000 kW). As of 2014, all of Norfolk Southern's ES40DCs are being uprated to 4400 horsepower, making them ES44DCs.

ES44DC[edit]

The ES44DC (Evolution Series, 4400 HP, DC traction) replaces the Dash 9-44CW model in GE's range. Primary users are BNSF Railway, CSX Transportation, and Canadian National Railway. Pilbara Iron in Australia ordered a lengthened, international version designated ES44DCi. The extra length is used for a larger radiator to increase cooling capacity in the Australian outback.

ES44AC[edit]

Iowa Interstate Railroad #505 enters Blue Island.

The ES44AC (Evolution Series, 4400 HP, AC traction) replaces the AC4400CW model in GE's range. These locomotives have been ordered by Union Pacific Railroad (who refers to these locomotives as the C45ACCTE), BNSF Railway, CSX Transportation, Norfolk Southern Railway, Kansas City Southern Railway, Kansas City Southern de Mexico, Ferromex, and Canadian Pacific Railway. Iowa Interstate Railroad ordered 14 ES44AC's in April 2008 to be delivered by October 2008 to handle an expected traffic growth of 25%-30%, resulting from new ethanol plants coming on line.[citation needed] Iowa Interstate ordered two additional ES44AC's to be delivered in December 2009. Iowa Interstate again ordered 3 additional GE ES44AC's after selling 2 of the railroads EMD SD38-2's for the new ethanol plants.

CSX began receiving an order of 200 ES44AC's (referred to by CSX as the ES44AH) in December 2007. The "H" in ES44AH stands for "high", which is in reference to a combination of subsystems that produce high levels of tractive effort at low speeds. In order to be classified as an "AH" by CSX, a locomotive has to have not only an increased nominal weight (currently to 432,000 pounds or 196,000 kilograms), but also (1) steerable trucks, (2) TM3 adhesion control software, (3) software that extends to 33,000 pounds from 30,000 pounds the maximum amount of tractive effort that each traction motor is permitted to produce, and (4) GE's Rail Cleaner, which directs high-pressure air onto the rails in front of the sand nozzles forward of axle number one.

In September 2008, Norfolk Southern purchased 24 ES44AC's numbered 8000-8023, and began receiving the first of these units in October 2008. They are the first new AC locomotives ever purchased by NS. These new locomotives will be used in long haul coal trains.[citation needed] An additional 65 units were ordered in 2011, numbered 8025-8090. 24 more units, numbered 8091-8115, were ordered at the beginning of 2012. 10 of these units: 8025, 8098-8105 & 8114 were painted in predecessor company "heritage" paint schemes for NS's 30th anniversary. All NS ES44AC's are built to CSX specifications, with the exception of the Hi-Ad trucks & headlight placement.

NS 30th Anniversary, #8100 in Nickel Plate livery

KCS's units are all painted in a Southern Belle paint scheme. The KCS units are being painted in Erie by GE, while some of KCSM's units have been delivered in primer to speed up delivery time.[citation needed]

Cemex took delivery of one ES44AC - built to CSXT specifications - numbered 81, in March 2008.

Canadian National announced in January 2012 that 35 ES44AC's were on order for 2012-2013 delivery to be used primarily on the grades of its ex-BC Rail main line.

Citirail/CREX acquired 100 ES44AC's for lease service. They are painted silver with blue & yellow nose striping and blue numbers. As of August 2014, most if not all of these units are leased to BNSF Railway.

ES44C4[edit]

BNSF Railway #8013 at Dallas, Texas, 20 May 2014, awaiting re-crew.

The ES44C4 (Evolution Series, 4400 HP, AC traction, 4 traction motors) is the newest model in the series. It is similar to the ES44AC, except that it has four traction motors instead of six. The center axle of each truck is unpowered, giving an A1A-A1A wheel arrangement. BNSF Railway is the launch customer for this model, ordering an initial batch of 25 units numbered 6600-6624.[6] BNSF was the first buyer of this model and has over 700 units. On January 30, 2014 Florida East Coast Railway announced that they would buy 24 ES44C4's, to be numbered 800-823, for heavy haul service and intermodal traffic. All are to be delivered by the end of 2014 to beat the EPA's deadline on exhaust-emissions standards for new-built Tier-3 locomotives.

A unique feature of these units is that there is a variable traction control system in their computer systems. One of the differences between an ES44AC and an ES44C4 are the air cylinders and linkages on the truck sideframes of the ES44C4; these are part of the traction control system. Every time a variable in grade, traction, or wheel slip occurs, the computer will adjust the pressure in these cylinders to maintain sufficient adhesion, by varying the weight on the drive axles.[7][8]

Identifying features[edit]

The Evolution Series locomotives are visually similar to the Dash 9 and AC4400CW, although small differences are evident. The most significant differences are the radiator section at the rear of the locomotive is larger and the "wings" on top of the radiator section are larger, as well. As with the AC6000CW the radiators project beyond the end of the hood, though not to the same extent. Also unlike any previous GE locomotive the grills under the radiator are at two different angles. The increase in radiator size is due to the necessity of greater cooling capacity in the locomotive in order to reduce emissions. The other major difference between the Evolution Series locomotives and older models are the vents below the radiators, which are larger than those on previous GE locomotives.[9]

Tier 4[edit]

In 2012, GE unveiled it's first Tier 4 emissions locomotive. The prototype and demonstrators are slightly different than previous versions. While the front part of the engine is unchanged, the rear part has been changed considerably. The Radiator and engine compartment are slightly taller than the rest of the locomotive. Also, the radiator is even larger and angled down in order to further cut emissions.

Operators[edit]

Export sales[edit]

Images[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b ES44DC Datasheet, The Diesel Shop
  2. ^ a b ES44AC Datasheet, The Diesel Shop
  3. ^ a b ES44C4 Datasheet, The Diesel Shop
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ a b Lustig, David (2010). "10 Locomotives That Changed Railroading". Trains (magazine). 
  6. ^ "GE unveils ES44C4 locomotive". Railway Gazette International. 27 May 2009. Retrieved 25 January 2012. 
  7. ^ "GE Transportation unveils new Evolution Series locomotive". 
  8. ^ http://www.gevirtualrailexpo.com/ge_virtual_rail_expo/media/files/model-es44c4.pdf?ext=.pdf
  9. ^ Solomon, Brian (2005). Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway. MBI. ISBN 978-0-7603-2108-9. 
  10. ^ Smith, Rob (September 2010). "GEVOs head to Cartier". Trains Magazine (Kalmbach Publishing): 17. 
  11. ^ Diesel Era Magazine, Jan./Feb. 2013, pg.2.
  12. ^ "Ferrocaril Mexicano (Ferromex)". The Diesel Shop. Retrieved 11 July 2010. 
  13. ^ a b Richard Marsh (April 2010). "Iowa Interstate salutes Rock Island". Trains Magazine (Kalmbach Publishing). 
  14. ^ "Kansas City Southern". The Diesel Shop. 2 January 2010. Retrieved 31 March 2010. 
  15. ^ Diesel Era Magazine, March/April 2012, pg.8.
  16. ^ Diesel Era Magazine, July/August 2013, pg.2
  17. ^ "Union Pacific Railroad Unveils No. 2010 Boy Scouts of America Commemorative Locomotive". Enhanced Online News. 31 March 2010. Retrieved 8 May 2010. 
  18. ^ "GE ships first CML diesel locomotive to China". Railway Gazette International. 2008-08-21. Retrieved 2008-08-21. [dead link]
  19. ^ "President opens Astana locomotive plant". Railway Gazette International. 2009-07-06. Retrieved 2009-07-22. [dead link]
  20. ^ "Evolution grabs hold in Kazakhstan". Late Breaking Industry News (Railway Age). 2006-09-28. Retrieved 2006-10-03. 
  21. ^ "Photo of the ТЭ33А-0007 in Almaty". 
  22. ^ "Rail". Rio Tinto Iron Ore. Retrieved 31 March 2010. 
  23. ^ Closeup of the radiator on Rio Tinto 8110
  24. ^ Rio Tinto 8118 prior to delivery
  25. ^ Rio Tinto 8120 prior to delivery
  26. ^ GE Transportation and Egyptian National Railways Announce the Completion of Commissioning of 80 Evolution Series Locomotives (2009-07-13)
  27. ^ Photos of ES40ACi for Egypt at delivery

Bibliography[edit]

  • Graham-White, Sean (2007). GE Evolution Locomotives. St. Paul, MN, USA: MBI. ISBN 9780760322987. 
  • Lamb, J. Parker (2007). Evolution of the American Diesel Locomotive. Railroads Past and Present. Bloomington, IN, USA: Indiana University Press. ISBN 9780253348630. 
  • McDonnell, Greg (2008). Locomotives: The Modern Diesel and Electric Reference. Erin, Ontario: Boston Mills Press. ISBN 978-1550464931. 
  • Solomon, Brian (2003). GE Locomotives: 110 Years of General Electric Motive Power. St. Paul, MN, USA: MBI Publishing. ISBN 9780760313619. 
  • Solomon, Brian (2010). Modern Locomotives: High Horsepower Diesels 1966–2000. New York: Crestline. ISBN 978-0785826811. 
  • Solomon, Brian (2011). Modern Diesel Power. Minneapolis, MN, USA: MBI Publishing. ISBN 9780760339435. 
  • Solomon, Brian (2012). North American Locomotives: A Railroad-by-Railroad Photohistory. Minneapolis, MN, USA: Voyageur Press. ISBN 9780760343708. 

External links[edit]