Freedom Now

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Freedom Now
Founded2000
Founder(s)Jared Genser
Headquarters
Key peopleJared Genser
(Founder)
Maran Turner
(Executive Director)
Area servedWorldwide
Focus(es)Human rights
Websitefreedom-now.org
 
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Freedom Now
Founded2000
Founder(s)Jared Genser
Headquarters
Key peopleJared Genser
(Founder)
Maran Turner
(Executive Director)
Area servedWorldwide
Focus(es)Human rights
Websitefreedom-now.org

Freedom Now is a Washington, D.C.-based non-profit, non-partisan organization that seeks to facilitate representation for arbitrarily detained individuals who have neither used nor advocated violence and whose detention violates fundamental principles of international law.

Its approach is to use focused legal, political, and public relations advocacy efforts[1] designed to compel the release of individuals deprived of their liberty in violation of the rights and freedoms enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and other international human rights instruments.[2]

A small organization with limited resources, Freedom Now works closely with other human rights organizations and lawyers[examples needed] to identify high-impact cases that would benefit from the organization's approach.

Selected Current Campaigns[edit]

Freedom Now represents prisoners of conscience worldwide, including:[3]

Selected Past Campaigns[edit]

Prisoners of conscience previously represented by Freedom Now include:[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kashino, Marisa M. "I'm an American" Washingtonian Oct. 12, 2010. Retrieved June 26, 2011.
  2. ^ Jared Genser & Margaret Winterkorn-Meikle, The Intersection of Politics and International Law: The United Nations Working Group on Arbitrary Detention in Theory and Practice, 38 COLUM. HUM. RTS. L. REV. 101, 131 n. 139 (2008).
  3. ^ Current Campaigns Freedom Now, Retrieved on Jan 24, 2011.
  4. ^ Watts, Nathan; Weaver, Matthew (2010-10-11) "China cancels meeting with Norwegian minister after Nobel peace prize row", The Guardian. Retrieved 2010-10-12.
  5. ^ Past Campaigns Freedom Now, Retrieved on June 26, 2011.

External links[edit]