Fred Adams

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Fred C. Adams
Born1961
ResidenceUniversity of Michigan
Fieldsastrophysics
Alma materIowa State University
University of California, Berkeley
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Fred C. Adams
Born1961
ResidenceUniversity of Michigan
Fieldsastrophysics
Alma materIowa State University
University of California, Berkeley

Fred C. Adams (born 1961) is an American astrophysicist who has made contributions to the study of physical cosmology.

Biography[edit]

Fred Adams is professor of physics at the University of Michigan, where his main field of research is astrophysics theory focusing on star formation, background radiation fields, and the early universe.


He was educated at Iowa State University, where he earned his B.S. in 1983, and at University of California, Berkeley, earning his Ph.D. in 1988. He continued his research at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

Adams works in the general area of theoretical astrophysics with a focus on the study of star formation and cosmology. He is internationally recognized for his work on the radioactive signature of the star formation process, the dynamics of circumstellar disks, and the physics of molecular clouds. He has received recognition as an astrophysicist including the Robert J. Trumpler Award and the Helen B. Warner Prize. His recent work in star formation includes the development of a theory for the initial mass function for forming stars and studies of extra-solar planetary systems. In cosmology, he has studied many aspects of the inflationary universe, cosmological phase transitions, magnetic monopoles, cosmic rays, anti-matter, the cosmic background radiation, galactic halos of dark matter, and the long-term future of the universe.

He is the co-author of the book The Five Ages of the Universe with Greg Laughlin.

Writings[edit]

He has written many scientific research articles including:

References[edit]