FrackNation

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FrackNation
Directed byAnn McElhinney, Phelim McAleer and Magdalena Segieda
Produced byAll individuals who provided funding for the project
StarringFarmers, small business owners, workers, ordinary residents.
CountryUnited States, United Kingdom and Poland
LanguageEnglish
 
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FrackNation
Directed byAnn McElhinney, Phelim McAleer and Magdalena Segieda
Produced byAll individuals who provided funding for the project
StarringFarmers, small business owners, workers, ordinary residents.
CountryUnited States, United Kingdom and Poland
LanguageEnglish

FrackNation is a feature documentary created by Phelim McAleer and Ann McElhinney, the directors of Not Evil Just Wrong and Mine Your Own Business, and Magdalena Segieda that aims to address misinformation about the process of hydraulic fracturing, commonly called fracking.

The film looks at the process of fracking for natural gas and seeks to address the concerns surrounding the process that were highlighted in the anti-fracking Gasland. The film interviews many individuals directly affected by fracking, most of whom support the process.[1]

Contents

Inspiration

FrackNation was inspired by a confrontation between Josh Fox, the director of the 2010 documentary Gasland, and documentary filmmaker Phelim McAleer. While Fox was promoting his film project McAleer confronted him about the historical records of people being able to ignite natural gas in water long before fracking started. McAleer told the LA Times that Fox did not include that information in his film because he did not think it was relevant towards the current drilling impacts of certain areas[2], since the people interviewed in the film claimed that the contamination was caused by the drilling[3].

After a video of the confrontation [4] was made public on various websites, Fox and his lawyers got the video removed from YouTube and Vimeo. However, FrackNation's filmmakers managed to fight the removal and restore access to the video.

McAleer told Politico he was motivated to make the film by what he saw as the "one-sided approach taken by the media, 'outsiders' and 'urban elites'" on the fracking process. McAleer said there has been no real debate on the issue, with the environmental lobby relying on emotion and scare tactics to condemn fracking. [5]

In an interview with the Pittsburgh Post Gazette McAleer stressed the film is trying to show both sides of the fracking discussion. "We're definitely covering the contamination" in the film, Mr. McAleer said. "We feature both sides." [6]

The film is expected to be completed in June 2012. [7]

Synopsis

The most impoverished communities across the United States have seen an unexpected revival. Shale gas, produced through a controversial method of hydraulic fracturing has created an economic boom, touching everyone, from farmers to small business owners to workers to ordinary residents. But when several of the landowners who leased their land for drilling sue[citation needed] a gas company for making their water flammable, a movement of anti-fracking activists creates a political pressure that results in a series of bans and moratoriums on fracking that put the development on hold.

In the film farmers point out without being able to lease a portion of their land for fracking, they would be forced to sell off the land to housing developers. [8]

Funding

A public crowdfunding campaign was launched on Kickstarter on Feb. 6, 2012. FrackNation was featured as the most popular project in Kickstarters film section. It reached the fundraising target of $150,000 within three weeks of launching.[9]

The filmmakers offered an executive producer credit to anyone who supports the project. Currently FrackNation has 2,405 executive producers. More than 2,000 contributors helped the filmmakers reach their target fundraising. [10] The average individual donation to the film was $60. Many of the donations at this level were former or current employees of Cabot, and other firms engaged in fracking Colorado Observer, March 6, 2012 [6]

In order to maintain full transparency and keep the film free from special interests, McAleer and McElhinney have returned all donations from companies or senior executives in the gas industry.[1] [11]

See also

References

External links