Flower Mound, Texas

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Flower Mound, Texas
—  Town  —
Location of Flower Mound in Denton County, Texas
Coordinates: 33°1′54″N 97°4′44″W / 33.03167°N 97.07889°W / 33.03167; -97.07889Coordinates: 33°1′54″N 97°4′44″W / 33.03167°N 97.07889°W / 33.03167; -97.07889
CountryUnited States United States
StateTexas Texas
CountiesDenton, Tarrant
IncorporatedFebruary 25, 1961 (1961-02-25)
Government
 • TypeCouncil–manager
 • Town CouncilMayor Thomas Hayden
Kendra Stephenson
Bryan Webb
Mark Wise
Steve Dixon
Vacant
 • Town ManagerHarlan Jefferson
Area
 • Town43.4 sq mi (112 km2)
 • Land41.39 sq mi (107.2 km2)
 • Water2.5 sq mi (6 km2)
Elevation604 ft (184 m)
Population (2010)
 • Town64,669
 • Density1,562.5/sq mi (603.3/km2)
 • Metro6,447,615
Time zoneCentral (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)Central (UTC-5)
ZIP codes75022, 75028
Area code(s)972
FIPS code48-26232[1]
GNIS feature ID1335983[2]
Websitewww.flower-mound.com
 
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Flower Mound, Texas
—  Town  —
Location of Flower Mound in Denton County, Texas
Coordinates: 33°1′54″N 97°4′44″W / 33.03167°N 97.07889°W / 33.03167; -97.07889Coordinates: 33°1′54″N 97°4′44″W / 33.03167°N 97.07889°W / 33.03167; -97.07889
CountryUnited States United States
StateTexas Texas
CountiesDenton, Tarrant
IncorporatedFebruary 25, 1961 (1961-02-25)
Government
 • TypeCouncil–manager
 • Town CouncilMayor Thomas Hayden
Kendra Stephenson
Bryan Webb
Mark Wise
Steve Dixon
Vacant
 • Town ManagerHarlan Jefferson
Area
 • Town43.4 sq mi (112 km2)
 • Land41.39 sq mi (107.2 km2)
 • Water2.5 sq mi (6 km2)
Elevation604 ft (184 m)
Population (2010)
 • Town64,669
 • Density1,562.5/sq mi (603.3/km2)
 • Metro6,447,615
Time zoneCentral (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)Central (UTC-5)
ZIP codes75022, 75028
Area code(s)972
FIPS code48-26232[1]
GNIS feature ID1335983[2]
Websitewww.flower-mound.com

Flower Mound is an incorporated town in Denton and Tarrant counties in the U.S. state of Texas and a suburb of the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex. Its population was 50,702 at the U.S. Census Bureau's 2000 census, and 64,669 at the 2010 Census.[3] The town derives its name from the prominent 12.5-acre (51,000 m2) mound located in the southern portion of the town.

First settled in the 1840s, residents did not incorporate until 1961. The town's slow growth continued until Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport opened to the south of the city, and since then the population has increased dramatically. Despite the recent growth, Flower Mound refers to itself as the "Town of Flower Mound" with a "Town Hall" and a "Town Council" rather than the customary "city" label. In recent years, with its moderately affluent population and proximity to the metroplex, Flower Mound has experienced more rapid industrial growth to match the growing needs of the primarily residential community.

Contents

History

Native American habitation of what eventually became Denton County dates back to at least 4000 BC, according to archaeological surveys conducted by the United States Army Corps of Engineers.[citation needed] White settlement began in Flower Mound when Presbyterians established a camp in the area in the 1840s.[4] At first, the group held religious camps for two to three weeks at a time.[5] By 1854, residents had established the Flower Mound Presbyterian Church.[6] Early settlers such as Andrew Morriss and David Kirkpatrick are memorialized with street names in the town.

The area remained sparsely populated for many decades after the initial settlement. In February 1961, the town incorporated to avoid annexation by the city of Irving. William Wilkerson, who became the town's second mayor, spearheaded the incorporation effort and helped improve the town's phone service and water supply. In 1970, Flower Mound had 1,685 residents, but the construction of Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport sparked a period of rapid growth. Between 1980 and 1990, the town's population tripled to more than 15,000.[7] During the 1990s, the town's population grew at an average rate of nearly 13 percent per year, from 15,527 in 1990 to 50,702 in 2000. That decade, Flower Mound was the nation's tenth fastest-growing community.[8] Between 2000 and 2002, Flower Mound was ranked as the ninth fastest-growing city in United States with a population of more than 50,000.[9] In 1999, the town adopted a Strategically Managed And Responsible Town Growth (SMART) management plan, a smart growth initiative to manage both the rate and character of development in the community.[10] The program's goal was to create environmentally sensitive development and to mitigate the effects of urban sprawl. Flower Mound's population continued to rise by approximately 5 percent each year between 2000 and 2005. Controlled growth continues in central and western Flower Mound, and the amount of open space within the town limits is slowly decreasing.

Geography

Flower Mound is located at 33°01′54″N 97°04′44″W / 33.031741°N 97.078818°W / 33.031741; -97.078818 (33.031741, −97.078818).[11] The town was named for a small hill in what is now the southern part of the town. Named for the profusion of wild flowers that cover its slopes, it is owned and maintained by the Mound Foundation, a non-profit private–public partnership. Though surrounded by commercial and residential development, it is protected from further development. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 43.4 square miles (112 km2), of which 41.39 square miles (107.2 km2) is land and 2.5 square miles (6.5 km2) is water. Grapevine Lake and Marshall Creek form much of the southern boundary. The town borders Lewisville to the east and a number of cities and towns to the north, including Highland Village, Double Oak, and Bartonville. The two major highways in Flower Mound are farm-to-market roads. FM 1171, known in Flower Mound as Cross Timbers Road, runs east–west across the entire town. FM 2499 runs north–south and furnishes access to State Highway 121 and Interstate 635, north of DFW Airport. Much of the city is located on the Barnett Shale, a reserve of natural gas. Natural gas drilling in close proximity to residential neighborhoods has sharply divided the community in recent years.[12] The town also encourages conservation development projects to protect and preserve existing open space, vistas, and natural habitats while allowing for controlled growth. Flower Mound's climate is classified as humid subtropical.

Parks and recreation

In 1976, in response to environmental concerns and automobile traffic congestion, Flower Mound residents proposed adding a system of recreational and commuter bikepaths around the town.[13] Initially, funding proved elusive, but by 1989 the first 3 miles (4.8 km) of bicycle trails had been constructed, partly funded by a grant from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. In 2008, the town maintained 32 miles (51 km) of paved hiking and bicycling paths and 2 miles (3.2 km) of equestrian trails. Additionally, the Corps of Engineers maintains 9 miles (14 km) of equestrian trails and 14 miles (23 km) of natural surface trails within the town limits, most of which are located around Grapevine Lake.[14] In 2004, Lance Corporal Jacob Lugo became the first military serviceman from Flower Mound to die in the line of duty. Lugo was killed in Al Anbar during the Iraq War. In his honor, the town renamed Hilltop Park to Jake's Hilltop Park.[15][16][17]

Sports

A number of current and former players from the National Football League reside in Flower Mound, including Tony Casillas[18] “Mean Joe” Greene,[19] Chad Hennings,[20] Glen Titensor, and Donald Driver.[21] It is also home to Texas Rangers outfielder David Murphy.

Demographics

Historical population
YearPop.±%
1961750
19701,685+124.7%
19804,402+161.2%
199015,896+261.1%
200050,702+219.0%
201064,669+27.5%
Sources: 1961–2000,[14] 2010[3]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 64,669 people and 14,269 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,562.5 people per square mile. There were 21,570 housing units. The racial makeup of the town was 83.9% White, 3.2% African American, 0.1% Native American, 8.6% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.2% from two or more races, and Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.4% of the population.[3] According to the town's demographic profile United States Census Bureau, there were 21,011 households in the town, 53.6% of which had children under the age of 18 living with them, 75.2% were married couples living together, 7.8 had a female householder with no husband present, and 13.9% were non-families. The average household size was 3.07 persons. According to a 2007 estimate, the median income for a household was $105,812, and the median income for a family was $112,555.[22] Males had a median income of $69,467 versus $41,317 for females. The per capita income for the town was $34,699. About 2.2% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.7% of those under age 18 and 1.8% of those age 65 or over. As of 2006, a majority of residents moved to Flower Mound from another state[23]

Government

The Town of Flower Mound operates under a Council–manager type of municipal government. Residents elect five at-large members to the Flower Mound Town Council and one mayor. Members serve two-year terms.[24] In 2011, the town's various funds had $80,534,943 in revenues, $59,776,491 in expenditures, $301,767,885 in total assets, $96,451,764 in total liabilities, and $49,961,772 in cash and investments.[25] Flower Mound is located in District 63 of the Texas House of Representatives and is represented by Tan Parker.

Education

The town is mostly served by the Lewisville Independent School District. Other parts of Flower Mound are located in the Argyle Independent School District and Northwest Independent School District. The town is home to two high schools, Edward S. Marcus High School and the newer Flower Mound High School, both part of the Lewisville district. Private schools in the town include Coram Deo Academy and Explorations Preparatory School.

Economy

Flower Mound recognizes two major areas of current economic development, the Lakeside Business District and the Denton Creek District. Over $25 million has been spent to provide the two business districts with transportation thoroughfares and other public improvements.[26] Due to this spending and the town's proximity to the DFW Airport and major highways, many businesses have recently moved some local operations to the town, including Home Depot, Stacy's Furniture, Best Buy, and Stryker Corporation.[27] In 2007, FUNimation Entertainment signed a 10-year lease to move its headquarters to the Lakeside Business District in Flower Mound from nearby North Richland Hills.[28] The company, best known importing the anime series Dragon Ball, was valued at over $100 million when it was acquired by Navarre Corporation in 2005.[29] As of 2007, approximately 960 businesses were located in Flower Mound.[27] Lewisville Independent School District is the largest employer, at nearly 1,700 employees. The Town of Flower Mound employs 455, and 21 other businesses each employ at least 50 people.[27] 75% of Flower Mound's labor pool is in its labor force, of whom 95% are employed. Thirty percent of the employed are engaged in management, business, and financial duties, 28% in sales and office duties, and 25% percent in professional and related occupations.[27] Most residents work in the metroplex. There are two malls located near Flower Mound, Grapevine Mills and Vista Ridge Mall.

References

  1. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. http://geonames.usgs.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b c "Flower Mound (town), Texas". United States Census Bureau. 2012-01-31. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/48/4826232.html. Retrieved 2012-06-04. 
  4. ^ Bates, Edward (1918). History and Reminiscences of Denton County. Denton, Texas: McNitzky Printing Company. p. 31. LCCN 19004337. OCLC 2133818. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth61103/m1/49/. Retrieved 2012-06-05. 
  5. ^ Cannon, Bill (2004). "Forgotten Footnotes to Texas History". Texas: Land of Legend and Lore. p. 7. ISBN 9781556229497. 
  6. ^ Hervey, Hollace (2002). Historic Denton County: An Illustrated History. San Antonio, Texas: Historical Pub Network. p. 16. ISBN 978-1-893619-07-4. LCCN 2002101353. OCLC 52948987. OL3572319M. http://books.google.com/books?id=Kv8cdMN99r0C&pg=PA16. Retrieved 2012-06-04. 
  7. ^ The Cambridge Gazeteer of the United States and Canada. New York: Cambridge University Press. 1995. p. 217. 
  8. ^ "Flower Mound SmartGrowth Management Plan". Town of Flower Mound. http://www.flower-mound.com/smart/smartgrowth.pdf. Retrieved 2007-02-29. 
  9. ^ "Top 100 Fastest Growing Cities from 2000 to 2002 (pop. 50,000+)". City-data.com. http://www.city-data.com/top32.html. Retrieved 2007-02-20. 
  10. ^ "Flower Mound SmartGrowth Management Plan" (PDF). Town of Flower Mound. http://www.flower-mound.com/smart/smartgrowth.pdf. Retrieved 2007-02-20. 
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  12. ^ Hawes, Chris (2010-01-22). "Intense, Emotional Debate Over Gas Drilling in Flower Mound". WFAA. http://www.wfaa.com/news/local/Intense-emotional-debate-over-gas-drilling-in-Flower-Mound-82330767.html. Retrieved 2012-06-05. 
  13. ^ Walker, Jacilyn G. (1976). Bikeways for Flower Mound: A Proposed System of Recreational and Commuter Bikeways for the Town of Flower Mound, Texas. University of Texas at Arlington: Institute for Urban Studies. p. 2. http://books.google.com/books?id=0ewVHAAACAAJ. Retrieved 2012-06-05. 
  14. ^ a b Nielsen, Tony (2009-01-22). "The Trails of Flower Mound: Inspiration, Growth, and Vision" (PDF). Waco, Texas: Town of Flower Mound. p. 3. http://www.flower-mound.com/parks/trailsawards/FM%20Trails%201-22-%2709.pdf. Retrieved 2012-06-04. 
  15. ^ "Lance Cpl. Jacob Raul Lugo". Home and Away: Iraq and Afghanistan War Casualties (CNN). 2010-05-31. http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/war.casualties/memorial.html?campaignID=IF&soldierID=b7c506e5a13d764ca9dcf4d39580e913. 
  16. ^ "Battle in Iraq Claims Marine". Hi–Desert Star. 2008-05-28. http://www.hidesertstar.com/articles/2004/08/27/news/news3.txt. 
  17. ^ Roark, Chris (2008-08-23). "Flower Mound: Celebration of Life Sunday for Fallen Soldier". http://www.scntx.com/articles/2008/08/25/breaking_news/38.txt. 
  18. ^ Cardenas, Juana (2009-01-08). "Agave Offers Diners a Change of Scenery" (PDF). The News Connection (Flower Mound, Texas). http://www.flower-mound.com/econdev/articles/AgaveOpening.pdf. Retrieved 2012-06-04. 
  19. ^ Hairopoulos (2011-01-28). "Flower Mound's Mean Joe Greene: Current Steelers Carrying my Legacy". The Dallas Morning News. http://blackandgoldworld.blogspot.com/2011/01/flower-mounds-mean-joe-greene-current.html. Retrieved 2012-06-04. 
  20. ^ Hennings, Chad (2009). "The Author". ChadHennings.com. http://www.chadhennings.com/the-author/. Retrieved 2012-06-04. 
  21. ^ Townsend, Brian (2011-02-04). "Driver Bleeds Green, but Flower Mound is Home". The Dallas Morning News. http://www.dallasnews.com/sports/super-bowl/the-game/20110204-driver-bleeds-green-but-flower-mound-is-home-.ece. Retrieved 2012-06-04. 
  22. ^ Flower Mound 2007 Income Estimates
  23. ^ Kilborn, Peter (2009-07-07). Next Stop, Reloville: Life Inside America's New Rootless Professional Class. Macmillan. p. 100. ISBN 9780805083088. 
  24. ^ "Town Council". Town of Flower Mound. 2012. http://www.flower-mound.com/council/council.php. Retrieved 2012-06-04. 
  25. ^ Springer, Chuck (2012) (PDF). Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for the Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2011 (Report). http://www.flower-mound.com/finance/account/cafr/CAFR2011.pdf. 
  26. ^ "Properties". Town of Flower Mound Properties. http://www.flower-mound.com/econdev/properties.html. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  27. ^ a b c d "Employment". Town of Flower Mound Demographics. http://www.flower-mound.com/econdev/employment.html. Retrieved 2008-06-20. [dead link]
  28. ^ Wethe, David (2007-06-07). "Funimation Moving Headquarters to Flower Mound". Fort-Worth Star Telegram. http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-30963771_ITM. Retrieved 2007-06-07. 
  29. ^ "FUNimation Entertainment scripts HQ move". Dallas Business Journal. 2007-06-08. http://www.flower-mound.com/econdev/articles/FUNimationEntertainmentscriptsHQmove.pdf. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 

External links