Fisher Avenger

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Avenger
FISHERAVENGER.jpg
RoleKit aircraft
National originCanada
ManufacturerFisher Flying Products
First flight1994
Introduction1994
StatusKits in production
Number built65 (December 2011)[1]
 
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Avenger
FISHERAVENGER.jpg
RoleKit aircraft
National originCanada
ManufacturerFisher Flying Products
First flight1994
Introduction1994
StatusKits in production
Number built65 (December 2011)[1]

The Avenger is a single-seat, Canadian low-wing, tractor configuration ultralight aircraft. The Avenger was introduced in 1994 and is available as a kit or as plans from Fisher Flying Products.[1][2][3][4]

Fisher Flying Products was originally based in Edgeley, North Dakota, USA but the company is now located in Vaughan, Ontario, Canada.[2][3][5][6]

Development[edit]

The Avenger was designed to meet the requirements of the United States FAR 103 Ultralight Vehicles, including the maximum 254 lb (115 kg) empty weight. Design goals included low-cost, an aesthetically attractive look and accommodation for a 76 in (193 cm) tall, 240 lb (109 kg) pilot.[3]

Although originally designed to accept the 1/2 VW powerplant the aircraft can achieve an empty weight as low as 250 lb (113 kg) with the use of a lighter weight engine, such as the 28 hp (21 kW) Rotax 277 or the 35 hp (26 kW) 2SI 460-35. The Avenger was initially marketed with the now-discontinued Rotax 277 engine, but the use of this engine has been criticized as leaving the aircraft underpowered.[3][5]

Reviewer Andre Cliche says:

The Avenger is an experimental-class design that has been re-engined to fall under the ultralight regulations. For this purpose, a 28 hp Rotax 277 has been installed, thus allowing the weight to get lower than the 254 lbs. upper limit imposed on ultralights. This is technically feasible but the switch from a VW engine to a single cylinder Rotax also reduces the performance below a safe level. The rated 400 fpm rate of climb is barely adequate for safe operations. Put this machine in the wrong situation and it can bite you.[3]

Design[edit]

The Avenger structure is entirely constructed from wood, with a low wing braced to the landing gear. The wooden-framed wing is covered with aircraft fabric. The engine cowling is fibreglass. The conventional landing gear features a steerable tailwheel and main-gear suspension.[2][3]

The cockpit features an optional removable canopy.[5]

The Avenger has an estimated construction time of 400 hours from the kit.[3][7]

In 2011 the kit price (without paint, varnish, pilot/passenger restraints, instruments, upholstery, engine, engine mount or propeller) was US$5999, with the plans selling for US$300.[6][8]

Recommended engines include the 50 hp (37 kW) Rotax 503, 40 hp (30 kW) Rotax 447, 35 hp (26 kW) 2SI 460-35 or 38 hp (28 kW) 1/2 VW.[5]

Operational history[edit]

In December 2004 the company reported that 50 Avengers were flying, the majority as US unregistered ultralights.[4]

Variants[edit]

Avenger
With a regular firewall for two-stroke engines. Engine options are 40 hp (30 kW) Rotax 447, 50 hp (37 kW) Rotax 503, or 28 hp (21 kW) Hirth F-33 or 35 hp (26 kW) 2SI 460-35. Thirty-five had been completed and flown by the end of 2011.[1][2][3][6][5]
Avenger V
With a 2" narrower firewall to accommodate VW engines. Engines include the 38 hp (28 kW) 1/2 VW and the 65 hp (48 kW) Volkswagen air cooled engine. Thirty had been completed and flown by the end of 2011.[1][2][3][5]

Specifications (Avenger with Rotax 503)[edit]

Data from Cliche,[3] KitPlanes[2] and Fisher Flying Products[7]

General characteristics

Performance

See also[edit]

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Vandermeullen, Richard: 2011 Kit Aircraft Buyer's Guide, Kitplanes, Volume 28, Number 12, December 2011, page 53. Belvoir Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  2. ^ a b c d e f Kitplanes Staff: 1999 Kit Aircraft Directory, Kitplanes, Volume 15, Number 12, December 1998, page 70. Primedia Publications. IPM 0462012
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Cliche, Andre: Ultralight Aircraft Shopper's Guide 8th Edition, page B-7. Cybair Limited Publishing, 2001. ISBN 0-9680628-1-4
  4. ^ a b Downey, Julia: Kit Aircraft Directory 2005, Kitplanes, Volume 21, Number 12, December 2004, page 58. Belvoir Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  5. ^ a b c d e f Fisher Flying Products (undated). "Flying The Avenger & Avenger V". Archived from the original on 2008-05-12. Retrieved 2009-08-01. 
  6. ^ a b c Bayerl, Robby; Martin Berkemeier; et al: World Directory of Leisure Aviation 2011-12, page 101. WDLA UK, Lancaster UK, 2011. ISSN 1368-485X
  7. ^ a b Fisher Flying Products (undated). "Specs & Performance". Archived from the original on 2008-05-03. Retrieved 2009-08-01. 
  8. ^ Fisher Flying Products (undated). "The Fisher Flying Price List". Archived from the original on 2008-05-03. Retrieved 2009-08-01. 

External links[edit]