Fat rascal

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Fat rascal
Fat Rascal cookies.jpg
Fat Rascals at Bettys Cafe Tearooms
Origin
Alternative name(s)Yorkshire tea biscuit, turf cake
Place of originUnited Kingdom
Region or stateYorkshire
Details
TypeCake/biscuit
Main ingredient(s)Currants and candied peel
 
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Fat rascal
Fat Rascal cookies.jpg
Fat Rascals at Bettys Cafe Tearooms
Origin
Alternative name(s)Yorkshire tea biscuit, turf cake
Place of originUnited Kingdom
Region or stateYorkshire
Details
TypeCake/biscuit
Main ingredient(s)Currants and candied peel

A fat rascal, also called the Yorkshire tea biscuit or turf cake, is a type of cake, similar to the scone in both taste and ingredients.[1] The fat rascal often has no definitive shape[citation needed] and is relatively easy to make[citation needed]. First baked in Elizabethan times[citation needed] and originating in Yorkshire[citation needed], it is considered[by whom?] a biscuit[citation needed].

Contents

History and etymology

Fat rascals are round domed tea-cakes with a rich brown crust and made with currants and candied peel. They are closely associated with the Cleveland area on the borders of County Durham and Yorkshire. The origin of the name is unknown, but has been in use since at least the mid-nineteenth century.[2] The name Turf Cake comes from the tradition of farmers baking them on turf fires

Bettys Fat Rascal

The Fat Rascal has been made nationally famous by Bettys Café Tea Rooms in North Yorkshire, a family owned bakers, confectioners and traditional English tea rooms, founded in 1919 by a Swiss confectioner, Frederick Belmont.

In 1983 Bettys introduced its Fat Rascal, adapted from a traditional recipe for ‘turf cakes’, adding a ‘face’ made from cherries and almonds. Since then the Fat Rascal has become one of its best selling cakes, synonymous with Bettys. So much so that they own the registered trade mark not only for the name ‘Fat Rascal’ but also for its distinctive appearance. 2013 will mark the 30th anniversary of the Bettys Fat Rascal.


In the United States, the fat rascal is generally listed as a breakfast cookie which can be vanilla or chocolate flavour. These can be purchased at The Ruby Pear Tea Parlor in Noblesville, Indiana.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ Waitrose recipe Accessed 2011-09-08
  2. ^ Patum Peperium Retrieved; 11-25-10
  3. ^ The Ruby Pear Tea Parlor Accessed 2011-09-08

External links