Falooda

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Faluda
Beverage
Faluda.JPG
Standard Faluda from Hyderabad with kulfi, rose syrup, tapioca pearls and basil seeds
Place of origin:
India
Region or state:
Andhra Pradesh
Main ingredient(s):
Milk, rose syrup, vermicelli, psyllium
Recipes at Wikibooks:
Cookbook Faluda
Media at Wikimedia Commons:
Wikimedia Commons  Faluda
 
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Faluda
Beverage
Faluda.JPG
Standard Faluda from Hyderabad with kulfi, rose syrup, tapioca pearls and basil seeds
Place of origin:
India
Region or state:
Andhra Pradesh
Main ingredient(s):
Milk, rose syrup, vermicelli, psyllium
Recipes at Wikibooks:
Cookbook Faluda
Media at Wikimedia Commons:
Wikimedia Commons  Faluda
Faluda from Burma

Falooda Urdu فالودا or Faluda is a cold and sweet beverage containing many ingredients very popular in South Asia. Traditionally it is made by mixing rose syrup with vermicelli, psyllium (ispaghol) or basil (sabza/takmaria) seeds, jelly pieces and tapioca pearls along with either milk, water or ice cream.[1] Faloodeh, originally Paloodeh or Pālūde (Template:Persian پالوده) is a Persian cold dessert consisting thin vermicelli noodles made from corn starch mixed in a semi-frozen syrup made from sugar and rose water. It is often served with lime juice and sometimes ground pistachios. It is a traditional dessert in Iran and also in neighbouring Pakistan. Paloodeh is originally from Shiraz and in Iran it is especially famous as Shirazi Faloodeh.[1] Paludeh is one of the earliest forms of cold desserts, existing as early as 400 BCE.[citation needed] The name originally means smoothy (filtered). In Iran paludeh (faludeh) is sold in ice cream stores (bastani) and in shops which specialize in preparing this desser The vermicelli used are often made from arrowroot rather than wheat. The rose syrup may be substituted with another flavoured base to produce kesar (saffron), mango, chocolate or fig flavour.

Nowadays faluda is a popular summer drink throughout Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, and the Middle East and is readily available in restaurants and beach stalls.

History[edit]

Faluda is of Persian origin and is assumed to have come to India during Nader Shah's kingship.Vermicelli used for preparing faluda are made from arrowroot whereas they are usually made of wheat in India.[2]

The ice was gathered during the winter or carried from the mountain tops in large insulated underground chambers topped by dome structures. This allowed ice to remain available throughout the summer and even in the desert. The best use was made to prepare desserts like faluda. Later on, as techniques improved, rose water and sugar were added with the vermicelli. Today there are many versions of faluda. Some are made without noodles and blended with fruit. One of the Indian versions consists of kulfi, translucent wheat-starch noodles and flavoured syrup. Some faludas are served as milkshakes.

Metaphorical references[edit]

In idiomatic Hindustani, faluda is sometimes used as a reference to something that has been shredded, which is an allusion to the vermicelli noodles. For example, someone who falls into disrepute might say that his or her izzat (honour) has been turned to falooda (इज़्ज़त का फ़ालूदा, عزت کا فالودہ, izzat ka falooda), which is roughly equivalent to saying "my reputation is shot."[3]

Variants[edit]

Faludas made in India are generally different from those made in Pakistan.

Falooda in Pakistan[edit]

Falooda is a favourite in Pakistan, especially in the summer. The city of Kasur, which is about 40 minutes drive from Lahore, is famous for its very own variant of falooda, in which the main ingredient is traditional light brown cream mixed with sugar syrup and vermicelli.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fall for faluda". The Hindu (Chennai', India). 16 August 2008. 
  2. ^ http://www.ifood.tv/network/falooda
  3. ^ India today, Volume 24, Thomson Living Media India Ltd., 1999, "... Magar this time to izzat ka falooda ban jayega (my reputation will be shot) ..." 
  4. ^ Rabdi faluda
  5. ^ [Hafiz Falooda House, darbar road Kasur]

External links[edit]