Fall River Mills, California

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Fall River Mills
census-designated place
Sign welcoming visitors to Fall River Valley
Nickname(s): Northern California's best kept secret
Location in Shasta County and the state of California
Coordinates: 41°0′21″N 121°26′27″W / 41.00583°N 121.44083°W / 41.00583; -121.44083Coordinates: 41°0′21″N 121°26′27″W / 41.00583°N 121.44083°W / 41.00583; -121.44083
Country United States
State California
CountyShasta
Settled1855
Founded byWilliam H. Winters
Government
 • TypeMunicipal
Area[1]
 • Total2.752 sq mi (7.128 km2)
 • Land2.593 sq mi (6.715 km2)
 • Water0.159 sq mi (0.413 km2)  5.79%
Elevation3,195 ft (1,014 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total573
 • Density210/sq mi (80/km2)
Time zonePacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST)PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code96028
Area code(s)530
FIPS code06-23532
GNIS feature ID0260035
WebsiteTown of Fall River Mills Website
 
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Fall River Mills
census-designated place
Sign welcoming visitors to Fall River Valley
Nickname(s): Northern California's best kept secret
Location in Shasta County and the state of California
Coordinates: 41°0′21″N 121°26′27″W / 41.00583°N 121.44083°W / 41.00583; -121.44083Coordinates: 41°0′21″N 121°26′27″W / 41.00583°N 121.44083°W / 41.00583; -121.44083
Country United States
State California
CountyShasta
Settled1855
Founded byWilliam H. Winters
Government
 • TypeMunicipal
Area[1]
 • Total2.752 sq mi (7.128 km2)
 • Land2.593 sq mi (6.715 km2)
 • Water0.159 sq mi (0.413 km2)  5.79%
Elevation3,195 ft (1,014 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total573
 • Density210/sq mi (80/km2)
Time zonePacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST)PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code96028
Area code(s)530
FIPS code06-23532
GNIS feature ID0260035
WebsiteTown of Fall River Mills Website

Fall River Mills (or Fall City) is an unincorporated town and census-designated place (CDP) in Shasta County, California, United States. The population was 573 as of the 2010 census.

Production & Industry[edit]

The community is known for its agriculture. Being home to the production of cattle, Fall River Wild Rice, Garlic, Mint, Hay, Lavender and Alfalfa.

History[edit]

The earliest known human occupation of the Fall River Mills area was by the Native Americans of the Achomawi (Pit River) Tribe. Although the Fall River valley had been known to settlers for a number of years, no attempt was made toward its settlement until 1855. In that year two men, by the name of Mr Bowles and Mr Rogers, came into the valley from Yreka, bringing with them teams of oxen and wagons loaded with mill machinery, which they unloaded at the upper falls of Fall River, and immediately went to work milling timbers in order to build the valley its first mill.

Shortly after, brothers Samuel and Henry Lockhart emigrated to the Fall River Valley and started the first ferry service across the Pit River. This assisted in making a link in the first wagon road from Yreka to Red Bluff. The Lockhart Ferry crossed below the confluence of the Fall and Pit Rivers, just south of where the town is currently located. During the winter of 1855-56, while Sam Lockhart and other settlers had gone from the valley for provisions, local native Americans came into the area and finding only Mr Bowles, Mr Lockhart and Mr Rogers left, made an attack on them, driving them from their homes to the top of Fall River butte, where the three men were massacred, winding up their work by burning their dwellings and destroying all the machinery intended for the mill. A company of 25-30 men was formed and returned to the valley to ascertain the fate of those who had attempted to settle for the winter. On entering the valley they found Sam Lockhart, who had returned before them and was besieged by Natives in a rock fortification which he had hastily constructed as his only means of cover. He had been there successfully fighting for five days, and was nearly famished for want of water, not daring to leave his stronghold to get a drink.

The Federal Government saw the necessity to protect the settlers traveling along the Shasta, Yreka Road (Shingletown Road) and The Lockhart Ferry. In 1857 the Army Department of the Pacific established a garrison in the Fall River Valley for that purpose. Originally named Camp Hollenbush and built by Company A, 1st Dragoons under the command of Capt. John W. T. Gardner, Fort Crook consisted of 25 - 30 log buildings enclosed by a pine-pole stockade, later the outpost was renamed in honor of Lt. George Crook, then in command of Company D, 4th Infantry. Lt. Crook became a General during the American Civil War and gained national fame as both an advocate of the area's local Indian populations and his battles with the Plains Indians

Soon after roads began to be established through the Fall River valley and in 1858 the McElroy Brothers who had just moved into the area built a bridge across the Pit river, Sam Lockhart having established a ferry on the same river, proceeded to build his bridge across the Fall river in an effort to make toll revenue during the fall of 1859. Both bridges were carried away during the floods of 1861-62. There being considerable travel through the valley, it became known that the stock range was almost unlimited, grass, of the finest and best quality, abounding everywhere; so a few venturesome individuals began settling in the valley with the view of making permanent homes. The first election was held in the fall of 1859, in an old log saloon near Lockhart’s ferry, at which time Wm. Cayton was the first Justice of the Peace elected in the valley.

General George Crook
Original Cabin from Fort Crook
Capt. William H. Winters

During 1868 a gentleman known as Capt. William H Winters noticed the awesome power of the confluence rapids created where the Fall River and Pit Rivers met. Knowing what a business opportunity the falls could give, he returned in 1872 with a gentleman only known as Cook and bought 650 acres (2.6 km2) of land with rights at the confluence. Capt. Winters eventually bought his partner Mr Cook out and proceeded to build a saw mill, flour mill, planing mill, bought and improved a toll road, then built the first permanent bridge across the Fall River. Since the drafting of the Shasta County Map of 1884, the community has been designated as Fall City.[2]

In 1920 developers embarked on an effort to establish the largest Hydroelectric Power Plant system in California's Northeast Wilderness. They renamed the town Fall River Mills to commemorate the many production mills in the town. One mill in particular would become the mainstay of the entire Fall River Valley. The Fall River Feed mill. The mill stood four stories tall and was the tallest building in the valley. The mill was destroyed by a fire on Friday, June 13, 2003.[3][4][5][6]

Local government[edit]

Local government in Fall River Mills includes:

Education[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Fall River Mills Airport

Fall River Mills Airport (FAA LID: O89) is a public airport located off Main Street, in downtown Fall River Mills, serving Shasta County, California, USA. The airport has one runway and is mostly used for general aviation.

Fall River Mills Airport, Tonkin Field, is the only airport within 75 miles (121 km) of Redding, California and Alturas, California. The airport was originally built in the 1940s as a location to train pilots for action in World War II. Over the years, the airport has been maintained and upgraded largely due to funding provided from the California Aid to Airports Program (CAAP). Today the airport has nine permanent t-hangars, five Portable hangars, approximately 30 tie-downs, and provides aviation fuel sales. The airport is equipped with runway lights which are designed to be turned on at night by the pilots as they approach the airport.[7]

Geography and geology[edit]

Fall River Mills is located at 41°0′21″N 121°26′27″W / 41.00583°N 121.44083°W / 41.00583; -121.44083 (41.005760, -121.440946)[8].

Fall River Mills is nestled between the Sierra Nevada and the Cascade mountain ranges in the far Northeast corner of Shasta County, California. The town is surrounded by mountains in all four cardinal directions with Mt Shasta and Mt Lassen visible from anywhere in the Fall River Valley.

Elevation varies only slightly throughout the valley floor, ranging from 3,200 to 3,400 feet (1,000 m). The surrounding passes all vary from 3,600 to 4,200+ feet.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.8 square miles (7.3 km2), of which, 2.6 square miles (6.7 km2) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2) of it (5.79%) is water.

Climate[edit]

Monthly Normal and Record High and Low Temperatures
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec
Rec High °F66788190101105109110107988268
Norm High °F475257647381898983715446
Norm Low °F222529323844474438312622
Rec Low °F-11-88171827273022107-20
Precip (in)2.962.892.821.441.360.730.210.360.791.342.332.55
Source: Weather.com [1]

Demographics[edit]

2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census[9] reported that Fall River Mills had a population of 573. The population density was 208.2 people per square mile (80.4/km²). The racial makeup of Fall River Mills was 450 (78.5%) White, 0 (0.0%) African American, 30 (5.2%) Native American, 3 (0.5%) Asian, 2 (0.3%) Pacific Islander, 56 (9.8%) from other races, and 32 (5.6%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 105 persons (18.3%).

The Census reported that 535 people (93.4% of the population) lived in households, 9 (1.6%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 29 (5.1%) were institutionalized.

There were 228 households, out of which 71 (31.1%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 93 (40.8%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 26 (11.4%) had a female householder with no husband present, 13 (5.7%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 15 (6.6%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 1 (0.4%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 83 households (36.4%) were made up of individuals and 41 (18.0%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35. There were 132 families (57.9% of all households); the average family size was 3.11.

The population was spread out with 140 people (24.4%) under the age of 18, 56 people (9.8%) aged 18 to 24, 107 people (18.7%) aged 25 to 44, 147 people (25.7%) aged 45 to 64, and 123 people (21.5%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.8 years. For every 100 females there were 96.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.6 males.

There were 280 housing units at an average density of 101.7 per square mile (39.3/km²), of which 128 (56.1%) were owner-occupied, and 100 (43.9%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 6.4%; the rental vacancy rate was 8.9%. 285 people (49.7% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 250 people (43.6%) lived in rental housing units.

2007[edit]

As of 2007, there were 712 people, 261 households, and 173 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 240 people per square mile (91/km²). There were 304 housing units at an average density of 111/sq mi (43/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 81% White, 10% Native American, 5% from other races, and 4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12% of the population.

There were 261 households out of which 35% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46% were married couples living together, 16% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33% were non-families. 32% of all households were made up of individuals and 15% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 31% under the age of 18, 7% from 18 to 24, 22% from 25 to 44, 23% from 45 to 64, and 17% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 83.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.9 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $29,833, and the median income for a family was $34,306. Males had a median income of $35,197 versus $21,364 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $15,667. About 22% of families and 28% of the population were below the poverty line, including 53% of those under age 18 and 18% of those age 65 or over.

Politics[edit]

In the state legislature Fall River Mills is in the 1st Senate District, represented by Republican Ted Gaines,[10] and the 1st Assembly District, represented by Republican Brian Dahle.[11]

Federally, Fall River Mills is in California's 1st congressional district, represented by Republican Doug LaMalfa.[12]

Plans for the Incorporation of the Fall River Mills communities into a City or Town were started. Stemming from public outcry due to development plans and a need for the local communities to maintain control over the area. Formation of a Municipal Advisory Council or MAC is ongoing. The MAC will be the political and authoritative voice of the Fall River Mills communities to not only Shasta County but the State of California. Plans are also being drafted for the implementation of several municipal services to include but not be limited to, Parks & Recreation, Police Department, Transportation, Community Facilities, Animal Control, Cemetery, Fire and Emergency Services. These are just a few of the services listed as proposed by the town of Fall River Mills and the Fall River Valley Community Services District. Areas proposed for inclusion in the incorporation are the communities of Fall River Mills, McArthur, Pittville, Glenburn and Dana.

Recreation[edit]

The Fall River Valley offers recreation for people of all ages and backgrounds with opportunities being numerous. These include many annual events, festivals and fairs. The Fall River Valley is home to a World Class Golf course. multiple locations for Mountain Climbing and Spelunking. Sport angling including Fly Fishing, with several tournaments and derbies held each year. Hunting in the Fall River Valley offers several big game species and upland game and waterfowl.

Boating and Canoeing are popular in the Fall River Valley as it is home to several Lakes including Fall River Lake, Eastman Lake and Big Lake. White Water Rafting is among several popular sporting activities that take advantage of the river systems in the valley. These tributaries include the Fall River, Tule River, Ja-She Creek, Lava Creek, Bear Creek, Shelly Creek and Pit River. Together they span much of the Valley forming one of the largest systems of fresh water springs in the country. These waters culminate in a splendid waterfall south of the Town of Fall River Mills and again at a viewing point off State Highway 299 West of Fall River Mills. The Valley is home to the Ahjumawi Lava Springs State Park, located north of the Fall River-McArthur Town Center. This state park is unique in that it is accessible only by water.

Local arts and culture can be viewed in several artists galleries and gift shops throughout the community. Equestrian and Rodeo Events are held throughout the year with the Intermountain Fair Rodeo being the mainstay event.

Several parks are situated throughout the community, offering family activities and sporting venues. These include Clark Field, Fall River Lions Community Park and the Joe Bruce Sports Complex.

Cycling has been extremely popular in the Valley for over a decade. hundreds of cyclists come from throughout the country each year to participate in the Fall River Century Bike Ride which is held in late spring.

Tourism[edit]

The Town of Fall River Mills California is located directly in the center of two mountain ranges; Mount Shasta and Mount Lassen. The beautiful area of Fall River Valley is home to this wonderful town that provides both an outdoorsmen dream like scenario and an agricultural lover’s paradise. The entire Fall River is spring-fed and it winds for 16 miles mostly through private agricultural land yet some of the access points are open to the public. It finally ends up going through Saddle Mountain and winds up at the Pit 1 Power House. The weather can be bitterly cold in the winter but it is very pleasant in the spring, summer, and early fall, with very warm days and crisp cool nights. If fishing is part of the itinerary, you could not do any better than Fall River Mills as it has one of the best areas for some really good rainbow trout fishing. A trip to this town will show you what a great Northern California agricultural community is all about. The town is well known for its wild rice and also for cattle, hay, lavender, and mint. If you’re looking for a nice place to stay the night or maybe a weekend then they have cabins and cottages as well as motels and restaurants. From old-fashioned family dinners to trendy cheese and wine outings, the town has a little bit of something for all. There is something available for any sized budget and taste. There is also white water rafting and world class fly fishing in the abundant springs and creeks throughout the town.[13]

Notable residents[edit]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ U.S. Census
  2. ^ California Place Names,The Origin and Etymology of Current Geographical Names By Erwin G. Gudde, William Bright, http://calarchives4u.com, April, 2010,
  3. ^ Fort Crook Historical Society,http://www.fortcrook.com, April, 2010
  4. ^ Mountain Echo Newspaper,http://www.mountainecho.com, June 13th, 2003
  5. ^ California Parks Service,http://www.parks.ca.gov, April, 2010,
  6. ^ California Genealogy & History Archives, http://calarchives4u.com, April, 2010,
  7. ^ Shasta County D.P.W,http://www.co.shasta.ca.us/index/pw_index/plans_programs/frm_airport.aspx, April, 2010
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  9. ^ All data are derived from the United States Census Bureau reports from the 2010 United States Census, and are accessible on-line here. The data on unmarried partnerships and same-sex married couples are from the Census report DEC_10_SF1_PCT15. All other housing and population data are from Census report DEC_10_DP_DPDP1. Both reports are viewable online or downloadable in a zip file containing a comma-delimited data file. The area data, from which densities are calculated, are available on-line here. Percentage totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. The Census Bureau defines families as a household containing one or more people related to the householder by birth, opposite-sex marriage, or adoption. People living in group quarters are tabulated by the Census Bureau as neither owners nor renters. For further details, see the text files accompanying the data files containing the Census reports mentioned above.
  10. ^ "Senators". State of California. Retrieved March 10, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Members Assembly". State of California. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  12. ^ "California's 1st Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 1, 2013. 
  13. ^ Shasta Search,http://shastasearch.com/cityinfo-city_name-Fall%20River%20Mills.htm, January, 2011

External links[edit]