Fajita

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Fajita
Flickr elisart 324248450--Beef and chicken fajitas.jpg
Mixed beef and chicken fajita ingredients, served on a hot iron skillet
Place of origin:
United States
Region or state:
Northeastern Mexico, Southwestern United States[1]
Main ingredient(s):
Tortillas, meat
Food energy (per serving):
500 kcal (2093 kJ)
Recipes at Wikibooks:
Cookbook Fajita
Media at Wikimedia Commons:
Wikimedia Commons  Fajita
 
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Fajita
Flickr elisart 324248450--Beef and chicken fajitas.jpg
Mixed beef and chicken fajita ingredients, served on a hot iron skillet
Place of origin:
United States
Region or state:
Northeastern Mexico, Southwestern United States[1]
Main ingredient(s):
Tortillas, meat
Food energy (per serving):
500 kcal (2093 kJ)
Recipes at Wikibooks:
Cookbook Fajita
Media at Wikimedia Commons:
Wikimedia Commons  Fajita

A fajita (/fəˈhtə/; Spanish: [faˈxita] ( )) is a term found in Tex-Mex cuisine,[2] commonly referring to any grilled meat usually served as a taco on a flour or corn tortilla. The term originally referred to the cut of beef used in the dish which is known as skirt steak.[3] Popular meats today also include chicken, pork, shrimp, and all cuts of beef. In restaurants, the meat is often cooked with onions and bell peppers. Popular condiments are shredded lettuce, sour cream, guacamole, salsa, pico de gallo, cheese, and tomato. The northern Mexican variant of the dish name is Arrachera.

Etymology[edit]

Beef fajita in San Jose, Costa Rica

Fajita is a Mexican or Tex-Mex diminutive term for little meat (chicken and beef) strips. The word fajita is not known to have appeared in print until 1971, according to the Oxford English Dictionary. The exact time in which the dish was named fajita is unclear.[3]

The word faja is Spanish for "strip", "band", "sash", or "belt".

Popularity[edit]

The food became popular in Tex-Mex restaurants in Houston, Austin, and San Antonio. In southern Arizona, the term was unknown except as a cut of meat until the 1990s, when Mexican fast food restaurants started using the word in their marketing. In recent years, fajitas have become popular at American casual dining restaurants.

In many restaurants, the fajita meat is brought to the table sizzling loudly on a metal platter or skillet, with the tortillas and condiments.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Patterson, Frank (October 14, 2003), Fajita, retrieved Nov 6, 2013 
  2. ^ Wood, Virginia B. (March 4, 2005). "Fajita History". The Austin Chronicle. Retrieved Jan 11, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b Wood, Virginia B. (March 4, 2005). "Just Exactly What Is a Fajita?". The Austin Chronicle. 

External links[edit]