Eucatastrophe

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The prince arrives to break the spell which has kept Sleeping Beauty and her kingdom asleep for 100 years. A classic and well known use of eucatastrophe. Illustration by Gustave Doré

Eucatastrophe is a term coined by J. R. R. Tolkien which refers to the sudden turn of events at the end of a story which ensures that the protagonist does not meet some terrible, impending, and very plausible doom.[1] As such, it is a kind of deus ex machina common in fantasy literature.[2] Tolkien formed the word by affixing the Greek prefix eu, meaning good, to catastrophe, the word traditionally used in classically-inspired literary criticism to refer to the "unraveling" or conclusion of a drama's plot. For Tolkien, the term appears to have had a thematic meaning that went beyond its literal etymological meaning in terms of form.[how?] In his definition as outlined in his 1947 essay On Fairy-Stories,[3] eucatastrophe is a fundamental part of his conception of mythopoeia.[how?] Though Tolkien's interest is in myth, it is also connected to the gospels; Tolkien calls the Incarnation the eucatastrophe of "human history" and the Resurrection the eucatastrophe of the Incarnation.[4]

Examples in Tolkien's work[edit]

The climax of The Lord of The Rings, as portrayed by Ted Nasmith.

It could be said that the climax of The Lord of the Rings is a eucatastrophe. Though victory seems assured for Sauron, the One Ring is permanently destroyed as a result of Gollum's treachery, and with it the Dark Lord and his fortress of Barad-dûr. This occurs despite Frodo, the chief protagonist, giving in to the will of the Ring and claiming it for himself. Essentially, it is an ostensibly dire situation which is nevertheless salvaged through some unforeseeable turn of events.

Another example of eucatastrophe is the recurring role of the eagles as unexpected rescuers throughout Tolkien's writing. While they have been referred to as exemplifying deus ex machina,[2] Tolkien described Bilbo's "'eucatastrophic' emotion" at the eagles appearance in The Hobbit as one of the key moments of the book.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mazur (2011). Encyclopedia of Religion and Film. ABC-CLIO. p. 174. ISBN 0313013985. 
  2. ^ a b Westfahl, Gary (2005). The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy: Themes, Works, and Wonders 1. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 195. ISBN 978-0-313-32951-7. 
  3. ^ Tolkien 1990, pp. 109–161
  4. ^ Tolkien 1990, p. 156
  5. ^ Carpenter, Humphrey, ed. (1981), The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, Letter No. 89, ISBN 0-395-31555-7