Erminio Macario

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Erminio Macario
Erminio Macario.jpg
Born(1902-05-27)27 May 1902
Turin, Italy
Died25 March 1980(1980-03-25) (aged 77)
Turin, Italy
OccupationActor
Years active1933-1975
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Erminio Macario
Erminio Macario.jpg
Born(1902-05-27)27 May 1902
Turin, Italy
Died25 March 1980(1980-03-25) (aged 77)
Turin, Italy
OccupationActor
Years active1933-1975

Erminio Macario (27 May 1902 – 25 March 1980), best known as Macario, was an Italian film actor and comedian. He appeared in 42 films between 1933 and 1975.

Life and career[edit]

Born in Turin, Macario made his debut at young age in the amateur dramatics company Don Bosco Oratory in Valdocco,[1] then he was part of some small amateur companies of his hometown until 1924 when he was cast in the company of dancing and pantomime of Giovanni Molasso.[2] Soon after, he entered the company of Wanda Osiris, the undisputed queen of the revue of that time in Italy.[2] Between the two wars he became in a short time one of the most popular comedians of the revue theater.[3]

Macario made his film debut in 1933 with Aria di paese but the success came just six years later with two comedy films directed by Mario Mattoli and co-written by a young Federico Fellini, Imputato alzatevi! and Lo vedi come sei... lo vedi come sei?.[2] After a series of successful comedies directed by Carlo Borghesio since the early fifties Macario appeared in short characterizations in anthology films and was sidekick of Totò in a number of films.[2] Starting from mid-sixties he finally dedicated to television and theater.[2]

Macario in Il chiromante

His comical style was referred as a mixture between Chaplin's Charlot and Marx Brothers.[4]

Selected filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Domenico Seren Gay. Teatro popolare dialettale: indagine-enciclopedia sul teatro piemontese. Priuli & Verlucca, 1977. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Gianni Canova. Enciclopedia del cinema. Garzanti, 2009. ISBN 881150516-X. 
  3. ^ Ennio Fulgheri. Manuale del cinema italiano. Swan, 1998. ISBN 8886464150. 
  4. ^ Valerio Venturi. Cesare Andrea Bixio. L'attività musicale di Bixio per l'industria cinematografica (1920-1945). Libreria Universitaria, 2010. ISBN 8862920229. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]