Eric Metaxas

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Eric Metaxas in 2012

Eric Metaxas (born 1963) is an American author. He is best known for two biographies, Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery about William Wilberforce and Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy about Dietrich Bonhoeffer. He has also written humor, children's books, and scripts for VeggieTales, and is one of two commentators who present the Breakpoint Commentary on radio.

Contents

Biography

Metaxas was born in Astoria, Queens, grew up in Danbury, Connecticut and graduated from Yale University, where he edited the Yale Record, the nation's oldest college humor magazine. Metaxas lives in Manhattan with his wife and daughter.[1] He is Greek on his father's side and German on his mother's, while he was raised in a Greek Orthodox environment.[2]

Writing

Metaxas's Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy won the 2010 Evangelical Christian Publishers Association Christian Book of the Year.[3] Although the book is popular in the United States, Bonhoeffer scholars have widely condemned Metaxas's book as unhistorical, theologically weak, and philosophically naive. Professor of German History and Bonhoeffer scholar Richard Weikart has credited Metaxas for his "engaging writing style" in his biography, but he critically assessed its content and characterized it as an appeal to Evangelical Christians in the United States, noting Metaxas' lack of philosophical, theological, and historical grounding to interpret Bonhoeffer properly.[4] The biography has also been criticized by Bonhoeffer scholars Victoria Barnett[5] and Clifford Green.[6]

Metaxas's biography of Wilberforce, Amazing Grace, was the companion book to the 2006 film.[7] He has also written over 30 children's books, including It's Time to Sleep, My Love and Squanto and the Miracle of Thanksgiving. He has written scripts for VeggieTales (even the Hamlet parody "Omelet" from "Strawberry Shortcake: Adventures on Ice Cream Island") and provided the voice of the narrator in "Esther... The Girl Who Became Queen."

Other writing has been published in the Atlantic Monthly and The New York Times.[1]

Other activities

Metaxas has been featured as a cultural commentator on CNN, MSNBC, and the Fox News Channel; and has discussed his own books on The History Channel, C-Span’s Book TV, the Glenn Beck Program, and Huckabee. He has been featured on many radio programs, including NPR’s Morning Edition, Talk of the Nation, The Laura Ingraham Show, and On Being with Krista Tippett, as well as Hugh Hewitt, Bill Bennett, Kerby Anderson’s Point of View, and The Alan Colmes Show.

Metaxas is the founder and host of a New York City lecture series on topics related to religion and culture called "Socrates in the City: Conversations on the Examined Life" that features such speakers as Francis Collins, Sir John Polkinghorne, Baroness Caroline Cox, N.T. Wright, Os Guinness, and Peter Kreeft. In 2012, he took over as co-lead commentator of Prison Fellowship's Breakpoint Commentary radio program.

Metaxas has debated at the Oxford Union, the world’s oldest debating society, and speaks widely on a variety of topics. His introductions of such figures as U. S. Senator Joseph Lieberman, former Attorney General John Ashcroft, and Rick Warren have made him sought after a moderator and speaker. He has moderated debates with Bishop Spong and President Obama’s former pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright; and has spoken at the White House, on Capitol Hill, at West Point, Yale, Cornell, Princeton, and many other venues. On February 2, 2012, Metaxas was the keynote speaker for the 2012 National Prayer Breakfast.[8]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Harper Collins author bio
  2. ^ "Deep thrills". ericmetaxas.com. 2006-06-19. http://www.ericmetaxas.com/media/press/deep_thrills/. Retrieved 2012-08-27.
  3. ^ "Christian Book Expo 2009: Christian Book Award". Christianbookexpo.com. http://christianbookexpo.com/christianbookawards/bookofyear.php. Retrieved 2012-07-06.
  4. ^ Richard Weikart, "Metaxas' Counterfeit Bonhoeffer: An Evangelical Critique: Review of Eric Metaxas, Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy", California State University. [1]
  5. ^ "Review of Eric Metaxas, Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy: A Righteous Gentile vs. the Third Reich". Journal.ambrose.edu. 3 September, 2010. http://journal.ambrose.edu/ojs/index.php/acchquarterly/article/view/46/92. Retrieved 2012-07-06.
  6. ^ Green, Clifford (5 October 2010). "Hijacking Bonhoeffer". The Christian Century. http://www.christiancentury.org/reviews/2010-09/hijacking-bonhoeffer. Retrieved 8 September 2012.
  7. ^ Metaxas, Eric. "Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery by Eric Metaxas". Harpercollins.com. http://www.harpercollins.com/book/index.aspx?isbn=9780061173004. Retrieved 2012-07-06.
  8. ^ "Obama says faith mandates him to care for the poor". The Washington Post. 2012-05-23. http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/on-faith/obama-says-faith-mandates-him-to-care-for-the-poor/2012/02/02/gIQAQaDBlQ_story.html. Retrieved 2012-07-06.

External links