Ergun Caner

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Ergun M. Caner
BornErgun Michael Caner
(1966-11-03) November 3, 1966 (age 46)
Stockholm, Sweden
OccupationProfessor of Theology and Apologist
EmployerArlington Baptist College
ReligionSouthern Baptist Convention
Spouse(s)Jill Morris (m. 1994) «start: (1994)»"Marriage: Jill Morris to Ergun Caner" Location: (linkback://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ergun_Caner)
Website
erguncaner.com
 
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Ergun M. Caner
BornErgun Michael Caner
(1966-11-03) November 3, 1966 (age 46)
Stockholm, Sweden
OccupationProfessor of Theology and Apologist
EmployerArlington Baptist College
ReligionSouthern Baptist Convention
Spouse(s)Jill Morris (m. 1994) «start: (1994)»"Marriage: Jill Morris to Ergun Caner" Location: (linkback://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ergun_Caner)
Website
erguncaner.com

Ergun Michael Caner (b. November 3, 1966) is a Swedish-American academic, author, and Baptist minister. Caner's mother converted to Islam, and the couple chose to raise Caner in the Islamic faith.[1] He emigrated to the United States at a young age and converted to Christianity in the early 1980s.[2]

Caner is the Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs at Arlington Baptist College. He is a professor of theology and church history, and was the former dean at the Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary and Graduate School of Liberty University.

He has authored and co-authored several books, many of which discuss Islam and Christianity. His book Unveiling Islam, co-authored with his brother Emir, sold more than 200,000 copies and has been translated into six languages. It also received a 2003 Gold Medallion Book award by the Evangelical Christian Publisher's Association.

Contents

Early life

Caner was born in Stockholm, Sweden in 1966.[2] His mother, Monica Inez Caner, married Acar and converted to Islam for her husband.[2]

Through the persistent evangelical efforts of a teenage Christian, Caner started attending the Stelzer Road Baptist Church and chose to leave Islam and convert to Christianity. His parents had already divorced at the time, but his father, through court order,[2] had established the continued religion for the boys being Islam.[3]

Public career

In 2002 Caner and his brother gained national attention after publishing a book, Unveiling Islam, about the Islamic faith.[4][5] IslamOnline's Ali Asadullah called it "a diatribe against Muslims and their faith."[6] The book, an insider's look at being raised as a devout Sunni under their father's tutelage, was a commercial success; selling 100,000 copies in a year[7] and winning a Gold Medallion Award.[8]

In the years following the publication of Unveiling Islam Caner became a well-known and popular speaker at evangelical schools and churches. After teaching at Criswell College for two years, Jerry Falwell of Liberty University asked Caner to join the faculty in Lynchburg, Virginia. Caner quickly became a popular professor. In February 2005, Falwell announced that Caner was to be the first former Muslim to become the President and Dean of an evangelical seminary, making Caner head of Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary.[9] Caner's leadership at Liberty Seminary and with the faculty he built saw the enrollment triple in a relatively short period of time.[10]

Controversy over veracity of autobiography

In 2010, an alliance of Christian and Muslim bloggers,[11] accused Caner of making up and lying about his life story by citing details that were incongruent with his regularly stated, printed, and often repeated story. On May 10, 2010, Liberty University announced that it would launch a formal inquiry into allegations of discrepancies in the claimed background of Caner, the Dean and President of the Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary and Graduate School.[12] Caner said, "I am thrilled that Liberty University is forming this committee, and I look forward to this entire process coming to a close."[13] On June 25, 2010, Liberty University removed Caner from his position as Dean of the seminary after finding "discrepancies related to the matters such as dates, names and places of residence."[14] Liberty University did decide to retain Caner as a full-time faculty member of the seminary for the 2010-2011 school year.

On September 24, 2010, Caner was the keynote speaker for the Twin City's 12th Annual Community Prayer Breakfast in Bristol, Virginia. When interviewed about the controversy, the chairman of the local prayer breakfast committee said that members were aware of the controversy, but the invitation had been issued before the controversy became apparent. He also noted that the Community Prayer Breakfast does not delve into the backgrounds of their motivational/inspirational speakers.[15] At the meeting, Caner claimed that he and his brother had seen the controversy coming for years. The bloggers were simply "frustrated people in their basements", he said, adding that it would take more than edited videos to take him down.[16]

Caner left LU in June 2011 to become Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs for the Arlington Baptist College.[17] The President of Arlington Baptist College, Dr. Dan Moody, stated that Caner's controversy was in the past and the new Vice President had his full confidence.

Caner instructs Marines in New River, North Carolina

Books

See also

References

  1. ^ Caner, Ergun, and Emir Fethi (2002). Unveiling Islam. Grand Rapids: Kregel Publications. ISBN 0-8254-2428-3.
  2. ^ a b c d Caner, Ergun, Emir Caner Unveiling Islam (Grand Rapids: Kregel Publications, 2002) 17
  3. ^ Court Order Decision by Ohio Court, June 8, 1978
  4. ^ "Converts take heat for book about Islam". The Robesonian. 26 July 2002. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=iIFFAAAAIBAJ&sjid=Yc4MAAAAIBAJ&pg=4187,6296236&dq=ergun-caner&hl=en. Retrieved 2 January 2011.
  5. ^ Breed, Allen G. (21 June 2002). "Former Muslims Stir Anger With Book Assailing Islam; Brothers Who Became Baptists Call Former Faith 'Violent'". The Washington Post. http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/washingtonpost/access/140029261.html?dids=140029261:140029261&FMT=ABS&FMTS=ABS:FT&type=current&date=Jul+21%2C+2002&author=Allen+G.+Breed&pub=The+Washington+Post&desc=Former+Muslims+Stir+Anger+With+Book+Assailing+Islam%3B+Brothers+Who+Became+Baptists+Call+Former+Faith+%27Violent%27&pqatl=google. Retrieved 2 January 2011.
  6. ^ Asadullah, Ali. "Former Muslims Attack Islam in New Book". IslamOnline. http://www.islamonline.net/servlet/Satellite?c=Article_C&pagename=Zone-English-ArtCulture/ACELayout&cid=1158658281186. Retrieved 2 January 2011.
  7. ^ Oh, Susie L. (6 June 2003). "Christian Authors Writing Book on Islam". Lakeland Ledger. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=kTcxAAAAIBAJ&sjid=4v0DAAAAIBAJ&pg=1916,4996691&dq=unveiling-islam&hl=en. Retrieved 2 January 2011.
  8. ^ "2003 Gold Medallion Book Awards Winners". ECPA Christian Book Expo. http://www.christianbookexpo.com/christianbookawards/gm2003.php. Retrieved 26 April 2012.
  9. ^ "Ergun Caner named dean of Liberty Baptist Seminary". Baptist Press. http://www.sbcbaptistpress.org/bpnews.asp?ID=20171. Retrieved 2 January 2011.
  10. ^ "Seminary Plans to Move to Old TRBC". Liberty University. http://www.liberty.edu/index.cfm?PID=18495&MID=13807.
  11. ^ Geisler, Norman. "In Support of Ergun Caner". http://www.normangeisler.net/articles/ErgunCaner/insupportofcaner.html.
  12. ^ "News & Events - News Article - Liberty University". Liberty.edu. 2010-05-10. http://www.liberty.edu/index.cfm?PID=18495&MID=18644. Retrieved 2010-12-17.
  13. ^ https://www.liberty.edu/media/1162/newsletters/newsletter%205-11-10.pdf
  14. ^ "Ergun Caner Out as Seminary Dean". Christianity Today. 2010-02-07. http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2010/julyweb-only/36-51.0.html. Retrieved 2010-12-17.
  15. ^ McGee, David "Liberty's Caner to speak at prayer breakfast" Tricities.com 9/19/10
  16. ^ McGee, David "Caner defends background in Bristol speech" News and Advance 09/25/10
  17. ^ SBC Today

External links