Episcopal Diocese of San Diego

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Diocese of San Diego
Location
Ecclesiastical provinceProvince VIII
Information
RiteEpiscopal
CathedralSt. Paul's Cathedral
Current leadership
BishopJames R. Mathes
Map
Location of the Diocese of San Diego
Location of the Diocese of San Diego
Website
edsd.org Diocese website
 
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Diocese of San Diego
Location
Ecclesiastical provinceProvince VIII
Information
RiteEpiscopal
CathedralSt. Paul's Cathedral
Current leadership
BishopJames R. Mathes
Map
Location of the Diocese of San Diego
Location of the Diocese of San Diego
Website
edsd.org Diocese website

The Episcopal Diocese of San Diego is the diocese of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America with jurisdiction over San Diego County, Imperial County and part of Riverside County in California plus all of Yuma County in Arizona. It is in Province 8 and encompasses some 50 congregations.[1] It was created in 1973 by splitting off from the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles.[2] Its cathedral, St. Paul's Cathedral, is in San Diego. [3] The diocesan offices are located in Ocean Beach at 2083 Sunset Cliffs Blvd., San Diego, CA 92107.

List of bishops[edit]

The bishops of San Diego have been:[4]

  1. Robert M. Wolsterstorff, (elected December 7, 1973, consecrated March 30, 1974, retired 1982)[5]
  2. C. Brinkley Morton, (1982–1992)
  3. Gethin B. Hughes, (1992–2005)
  4. James R. Mathes, (2005–present)

Schisms[edit]

Since 2003 nine churches experienced the exodus of large numbers of their congregation over growing discontent with the progressive message of the Episcopal Church. Women's ordination and the ordination of openly gay, partnered bishops have been the lightningn rod issues that encouraged these members to leave.[6] Some dissident groups attempted to retain control of their church buildings and property,[1] but in 2008, the California Court of Appeal ruled for the Diocese and upheld the authority of Bishop Mathes to dismiss parish vestry members and clergy who sought to take a parish out of The Episcopal Church.[7] Since then the dissident congregations have surrendered the property to the diocese. These congregations have become welcoming places of hospitality for spiritual sojourners.

Same Sex Marriage[edit]

The Episcopal Church provides "wide pastoral latitude" to individual bishops on the subject of blessing same sex couples.[8] In 2010 Bishop Mathes approved a policy by which individual parishes could, after a self study period, choose to recognize LGBT couples in a blessing service.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Davies, Matthew (April 9, 2009). "Fallbrook congregation to return to church on Easter". Worldwide Faith News. Retrieved 19 June 2012. 
  2. ^ "Horizons & Heritage: Marking New Milestones". Diocesan History Project. Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles. Retrieved 19 June 2012. 
  3. ^ Episcopal Church Annual, 2006, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: Morehouse Publishing, p. 342-343
  4. ^ Episcopal Church Annual, 2006, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: Morehouse Publishing, p. 342
  5. ^ "Robert M. Wolterstorff, first bishop of San Diego, dies at 92". Episcopal News Service. Retrieved 19 June 2012. 
  6. ^ Cadelago, Christopher (December 28, 2010). "Church walks away from Episcopal Diocese of S.D.". San Diego Union Tribune. Retrieved 19 June 2012. 
  7. ^ New v. Kroeger, Case no. D05112, http://www.courtinfo.ca.gov/opinions/revpub/D051120.PDF
  8. ^ "Liturgies for Blessings". 76th General Convention. Episcopal Church. Retrieved 19 June 2012. 
  9. ^ McCaughan, Pat (July 20, 2010). "San Diego: Bishop outlines process for same-gender blessings". Episcopal News Service. Retrieved 18 June 2012. 

External links[edit]