Ellsworth, Maine

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Ellsworth, Maine
—  City  —
Downtown

Seal
Location of city of Ellsworth in the state of Maine
Coordinates: 44°34′20″N 68°28′34″W / 44.57222°N 68.47611°W / 44.57222; -68.47611Coordinates: 44°34′20″N 68°28′34″W / 44.57222°N 68.47611°W / 44.57222; -68.47611
CountryUnited States
StateMaine
CountyHancock
Settled1763
Incorporated (town)February 26, 1800
Incorporated (city)February 8, 1869
Area[1]
 • Total93.92 sq mi (243.25 km2)
 • Land79.28 sq mi (205.33 km2)
 • Water14.64 sq mi (37.92 km2)
Elevation108 ft (33 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total7,741
 • Estimate (2011[3])7,764
 • Density97.6/sq mi (37.7/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code04605
Area code(s)207
FIPS code23-23200
GNIS feature ID0565863
 
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Ellsworth, Maine
—  City  —
Downtown

Seal
Location of city of Ellsworth in the state of Maine
Coordinates: 44°34′20″N 68°28′34″W / 44.57222°N 68.47611°W / 44.57222; -68.47611Coordinates: 44°34′20″N 68°28′34″W / 44.57222°N 68.47611°W / 44.57222; -68.47611
CountryUnited States
StateMaine
CountyHancock
Settled1763
Incorporated (town)February 26, 1800
Incorporated (city)February 8, 1869
Area[1]
 • Total93.92 sq mi (243.25 km2)
 • Land79.28 sq mi (205.33 km2)
 • Water14.64 sq mi (37.92 km2)
Elevation108 ft (33 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total7,741
 • Estimate (2011[3])7,764
 • Density97.6/sq mi (37.7/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code04605
Area code(s)207
FIPS code23-23200
GNIS feature ID0565863

Ellsworth is a city in and the county seat of Hancock County, Maine, United States.[4] The 2010 Census determined it had a population of 7,741. Ellsworth was Maine's fastest growing city from 2000-2010 with a growth rate of nearly 20 percent. With many historic buildings and points of interest, Ellsworth is busy from May until September with visitors from all over the United States and Canada. In addition, the city is the gateway for tourists visiting nearby Acadia National Park, Mount Desert Island and the Bar Harbor region.

Contents

History

"The first European who made definite mention of the Penobscot Bay and river, which wash its western side, was Thevet, a French explorer, in 1556. Martin Pring and Captain Weymouth, the English explorers, sailed along its shores in 1603 and 1605, and DeMonts, the Frenchman, explored some portions of the coast in 1604 and 1605. There is a tradition that Rosier, the historian of Weymouth's expedition, explored Deer Island thoroughfare, making a halt at the bold promontory in Brooksville, known as Cape Rosier. They found the county occupied by a tribe of Indians, who with those on Passamaquoddy waters, were noted for their long journeys in canoes; whence the general name for these Indians, Etechmins. DeMonts claimed the country in the name of the King of France in the true Catholic style, setting up a cross and calling the country “Acadie.” By this name it continued to be known until the capture of Quebec by General James Wolfe in 1759. When Weymouth came in 1605, he also claimed the country in the name of his King, James I of England. Thus the two leading powers of Europe became adverse claimants of the soil of Hancock County, and the wars these claims occasioned kept the county an almost unbroken wilderness during the provincial history of Maine."
"The first grants of land in the county were six townships, each six miles square, between the rivers Penobscot and Union (then known as the Donaqua), which were granted to David Marsh et al., by the General Court of Massachusetts, upon conditions, one of which was that they should settle each township with 60 Protestant families within six years. These grants were No. 1, Bucksport; 2, Orland; 3, Penobscot; ; 4, Sedgwick; 5, Blue Hill; and 6, Surry. Six other townships east of the Union River were granted on the same terms; three of which are in this county, viz.: No. 1, Trenton, granted to Eben Thorndike, et al.; 2, Sullivan, to David Bean, et al.; and 3, Mount Desert (Island) to Governor Bernard. The surveys were made by Samuel Livermore; and as there were three of the townships on each side of the river, it gave rise to the name which the stream now bears."

Postcards of Ellsworth

Geography

Ellsworth is located at 44°34'20" North, 68°28'34" West (44.572223, -68.476039)[6].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 93.92 square miles (243.25 km2), of which, 79.28 square miles (205.33 km2) is land and 14.64 square miles (37.92 km2) is water.[1] Located at the head of navigation, Ellsworth is drained by the Union River. Ellsworth Falls is the location of the Agassiz Outcrop [2], a National Historic Landmark, notable for its early recognition as evidence of glaciation.

The city is served by U. S. Route 1 and U.S. Route 1A, in addition to state routes 3, 172, 179, 180, 184 and 230.

Neighboring cities and towns

Demographics

Ellsworth City Hall (1935).

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 7,741 people, 3,305 households, and 2,048 families residing in the city. The population density was 97.6 inhabitants per square mile (37.7 /km2). There were 4,240 housing units at an average density of 53.5 per square mile (20.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.7% White, 0.7% African American, 0.4% Native American, 1.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.3% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.4% of the population.

There were 3,305 households out of which 29.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.0% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 38.0% were non-families. 30.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 12% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.81.

The median age in the city was 41.9 years. 21.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.3% were from 25 to 44; 29.9% were from 45 to 64; and 16.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.5% male and 52.5% female.

2000 census

In the 2000 census[7], there were 6,456 people, 2,755 households, and 1,782 families in the city. The population density was 81.5 people per square mile (31.5/km²). There were 3,442 housing units at an average density of 43.4/sq mi (16.8/km²). The racial makeup ofwas 97.79% White, 0.19% African American, 0.29% Native American, 0.42% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.29% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. 0.65% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,755 households, of which 27.7% had children under 18 living with them, 51.4% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.3% were non-families. 29.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone 65 years or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size 2.75.

In the city the population was 21.9% under 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 29.0% from 25 to 44, 25.2% from 45 to 64, and 17.2% who were 65 or older. The median age was 40. For every 100 females there were 88.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.4 males.

The median income for a household was $35,938, and the median for a family $41,884. Males had a median of $31,455 versus $22,188 for females. The per capita income for the city was $21,049. 9.2% of the population and 5.7% of families were below the poverty line. 9.4% of those under 18 and 8.3% of those 65 and older were below the poverty line.

Sites of interest

Notable people

References

External links