Elizabeth Eyre

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Elizabeth Eyre
Pen nameElizabeth Eyre is a Pseudonym of Jill Staynes and Margaret Storey
OccupationN/A
GenresMysteries, Historical
 
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Elizabeth Eyre
Pen nameElizabeth Eyre is a Pseudonym of Jill Staynes and Margaret Storey
OccupationN/A
GenresMysteries, Historical


Elizabeth Eyre is a pen name used by Jill Staynes and Margaret Storey. Jill Staynes and Margaret Storey have written many books together, but the Elizabeth Eyre pen name seems only to have been used for the Sigismondo series of novels.

Contents

Biography

The author bio for Elizabeth Eyre is identical on each of the novels in the "Sigismondo" series.

"Elizabeth Eyre is the pseudonym of Jill Staynes and Margaret Storey. They were pupils at the same school where they invented bizarre characters and exchanged serial episodes about them. Their first book together, at the age of fifteen, was called 'Bungho, or why we went to Aleppo'. It was not offered for publication. They have both written stories for children, and together created the highly praised Superintendent Bone modern detective novels as well as this series of Italian Renaissance whodunnits." ~ from the dust jacket of Bravo for the Bride, 1994, Headline Book Publishing Ltd.

Writing style

The Eyre novels are marked by colourful characters and an atmospheric treatment of its Italian Renaissance setting. While some characters are clearly intended as comic relief, the humour is dry and unobtrusive. The stories themselves are carefully plotted and well thought out.

Critical response

The Sigismondo series received a positive response from many reviewers when it was released, with good reviews appearing in the Mail on Sunday (London), the Sunday Express (London) and the Weekend Telegraph (London), some of which were reprinted on the dust jackets of the later volumes in the series.

From The Mail on Sunday, London

"An imaginative drama of courtly Renaissance Italy, complete with dwarves, secret passages, plots and passions – and feasts that make an English Christmas dinner look positively paltry. Sigismondo, the Duke's mystery sleuth, could well be starting a career to equal Ellis Peter's Brother Cadfael's"

Influence on popular culture

The books contributed to the historical mystery subgenre that arose in the 1990s with the success of Ellis Peters and the Cadfael series and Lindsey Davis and the Marcus Didius Falco series.

Although well received at the time of their release, the books now appear to be out of print, though many are still available through libraries and second-hand book traders.

Bibliography


External links