Elixir

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An elixir (Arabic: الإكسير‎, al-Ikseer, "the effective recipe", Greek: ξήριον, Xerion, "medical powder", "powder for drying wounds", from Greek: ξηρός, xeros, "dry"[1][2]) is a clear, sweet-flavored liquid used for medicinal purposes, to be taken orally and intended to cure one's ills. When used as a pharmaceutical preparation, an elixir contains at least one active ingredient designed to be taken orally.

Types[edit]

Non-medicated elixirs[edit]

They are used as solvents or vehicles for the preparation of medicated elixirs: aromatic elixirs (USP), isoalcoholic elixirs (NF), or compound benzaldehyde elixirs (NF). Active ingredient dissolved in a solution that contains 15 to 50% by volume of ethyl alcohol.

Medicated elixirs[edit]

East Asian vitamin drinks[edit]

Daily non-alcoholic non-caffeinated 'vitamin drinks' have been popular in East Asia since the 1950s, with Oronamin from Otsuka Pharmaceutical perhaps the market leader. Packaged in brown light-proof bottles, these drinks have the reputation of being enjoyed by old men and other health-conscious individuals. Counterparts exist in South Korea and China.

Western energy drinks typically have caffeine and are targeted at a younger demographic, with colorful labels and printed claims of increased athletic / daily performance.

Composition[edit]

An elixir is a hydro-alcoholic solution of at least one active ingredient. The alcohol is mainly used to:

The lowest alcoholic quantity that will dissolve completely the active ingredient(s) and give a clear solution is generally chosen. High concentrations of alcohol give burning taste to the final product.

An elixir may also contain the following excipients:

Storage[edit]

Elixirs should be stored in a tightly closed and light resistant container away from direct heat and sunlight.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=elixir
  2. ^ http://www.wordnik.com/words/elixir/etymologies