Electric Peak

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Electric Peak
Electric-peak-trees.jpg
Electric Peak
Elevation10,969 ft (3,343 m)[1]
Prominence3,389 ft (1,033 m)[1]
Location
Electric Peak is located in Montana
Electric Peak
Yellowstone National Park, Park County, Montana, U.S.
RangeGallatin Range
Coordinates45°00′19″N 110°50′15″W / 45.00528°N 110.83750°W / 45.00528; -110.83750Coordinates: 45°00′19″N 110°50′15″W / 45.00528°N 110.83750°W / 45.00528; -110.83750[2]
Topo mapUSGS Electric Peak
Climbing
First ascent1872 in Henry Gannett and party
Easiest routeHike
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Electric Peak
Electric-peak-trees.jpg
Electric Peak
Elevation10,969 ft (3,343 m)[1]
Prominence3,389 ft (1,033 m)[1]
Location
Electric Peak is located in Montana
Electric Peak
Yellowstone National Park, Park County, Montana, U.S.
RangeGallatin Range
Coordinates45°00′19″N 110°50′15″W / 45.00528°N 110.83750°W / 45.00528; -110.83750Coordinates: 45°00′19″N 110°50′15″W / 45.00528°N 110.83750°W / 45.00528; -110.83750[2]
Topo mapUSGS Electric Peak
Climbing
First ascent1872 in Henry Gannett and party
Easiest routeHike

Electric Peak is the tallest mountain in the Gallatin Range of southern Montana, close to the Wyoming border and rises to an altitude of 10,969 feet (3,343 m). The peak has some of the greatest physical relief in Yellowstone National Park, rising 3,389 ft (1,033 m) above its base.

Electric Peak was named during the first ascent in 1872 by the United States Geological Survey. Members of the Hayden Survey led by Henry Gannett[3] experienced electrical discharges from their hands and hair after a lightning event on the summit.[4][5]

Images of Electric Peak
Electric Peak, ca 1890 
Electric Peak, westside, 1967 
Electric peak and Rescue Creek, 2012

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Electric Peak, Montana". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2007-03-18. 
  2. ^ "Electric Peak". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2009-02-15. 
  3. ^ Jerry Penry (October 27, 2007). "The Father of Government Mapmaking: Henry Gannett". The American Surveyor. Retrieved 2007-10-28. 
  4. ^ "Electric Peak". SummitPost.org. http://www.summitpost.org/page/151336. Retrieved 2007-03-18.
  5. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 116. 

External links[edit]