Eilat Ashkelon Pipeline Company

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Eilat Ashkelon Pipeline Company
TypePublic
Founded1968
HeadquartersAshkelon, 78101, Israel
Area servedIsrael
Websitewww.eapc.co.il
 
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Eilat Ashkelon Pipeline Company
TypePublic
Founded1968
HeadquartersAshkelon, 78101, Israel
Area servedIsrael
Websitewww.eapc.co.il

The Eilat Ashkelon Pipeline Company (EAPC) operates several petroleum and petroleum products pipelines in Israel, most notably the Eilat Ashkelon Pipeline. It also operates two oil terminal and depots in the country. The company was originally formed in 1968 as a 50/50% joint venture between Israel and Iran (during the Shah's rule) to transport crude oil from Iran to Europe.[1][2] When relations between Israel and Iran were severed after the Iranian Revolution, Iran stopped taking an active part in the venture.

The services of EAPC are: transporting crude oil and refined products, long term storage, crude oil blending, processing of liquefied petroleum gas, fuel oil, destillates and gas.

History[edit]

sign for Jetty 2 in Eilat
Jetty 2 in Eilat
one of the storage tanks of the Ramat-Yotam tankfarm

Pipelines[edit]

Crude oil pipelines[edit]

Products pipeline[edit]

The bidirectional reverse flow project[edit]

This project reversed the flow direction of Eilat-Ashkelon pipeline oil - meaning that it can now flow southwards instead of only northwards, as originally conceived when Israel consumed Iranian oil. The idea behind the project is to transport crude oil from Russia, central Asian republics and Caucasus over the Black Sea and the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan pipeline to Southern Asia and the Far East at a competitive price. The capacity and size of the Suez Canal is limited and therefore expensive.

Oil ports[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ammann, Daniel (2009). The King of Oil: The Secret Lives of Marc Rich. New York: St. Martin‘s Press. ISBN 0-312-57074-0. 
  2. ^ Bialer, Uri. Fuel Bridge across the Middle East—Israel, Iran, and the Eilat-Ashkelon Oil Pipeline. In: Israel Studies, Vol 12, No 3 (Fall 2007)

External links[edit]