Egg Harbor City, New Jersey

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Egg Harbor City, New Jersey
City
City of Egg Harbor City
Location of Egg Harbor City in Atlantic County. Inset: Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Egg Harbor City, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°33′49″N 74°35′45″W / 39.563687°N 74.595865°W / 39.563687; -74.595865Coordinates: 39°33′49″N 74°35′45″W / 39.563687°N 74.595865°W / 39.563687; -74.595865[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyAtlantic
IncorporatedJune 14, 1858
Government[5]
 • TypeFaulkner Act (Small Municipality)
 • MayorLisa Jiampetti (term ends December 31, 2016)[3]
 • ClerkMeg Steeb[4]
Area[2]
 • Total11.438 sq mi (29.625 km2)
 • Land10.932 sq mi (28.314 km2)
 • Water0.506 sq mi (1.311 km2)  4.42%
Area rank196th of 566 in state
10th of 23 in county[2]
Elevation[6]13 ft (4 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total4,243
 • Estimate (2012[10])4,299
 • Rank403rd of 566 in state
17th of 23 in county[11]
 • Density388.1/sq mi (149.8/km2)
 • Density rank462nd of 566 in state
14th of 23 in county[11]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code08215[12][13]
Area code(s)609 exchanges: 704, 726, 804, 965[14]
FIPS code3400120350[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID0876119[17][2]
Websitewww.eggharborcity.org
 
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Egg Harbor City, New Jersey
City
City of Egg Harbor City
Location of Egg Harbor City in Atlantic County. Inset: Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Egg Harbor City, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°33′49″N 74°35′45″W / 39.563687°N 74.595865°W / 39.563687; -74.595865Coordinates: 39°33′49″N 74°35′45″W / 39.563687°N 74.595865°W / 39.563687; -74.595865[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyAtlantic
IncorporatedJune 14, 1858
Government[5]
 • TypeFaulkner Act (Small Municipality)
 • MayorLisa Jiampetti (term ends December 31, 2016)[3]
 • ClerkMeg Steeb[4]
Area[2]
 • Total11.438 sq mi (29.625 km2)
 • Land10.932 sq mi (28.314 km2)
 • Water0.506 sq mi (1.311 km2)  4.42%
Area rank196th of 566 in state
10th of 23 in county[2]
Elevation[6]13 ft (4 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total4,243
 • Estimate (2012[10])4,299
 • Rank403rd of 566 in state
17th of 23 in county[11]
 • Density388.1/sq mi (149.8/km2)
 • Density rank462nd of 566 in state
14th of 23 in county[11]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code08215[12][13]
Area code(s)609 exchanges: 704, 726, 804, 965[14]
FIPS code3400120350[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID0876119[17][2]
Websitewww.eggharborcity.org

Egg Harbor City is a city in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 4,243,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 302 (-6.6%) from the 4,545 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 38 (-0.8%) from the 4,583 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

History[edit]

Egg Harbor City was founded in 1854 by German Americans from Philadelphia as a refuge for those being persecuted in the anti-immigrant violence known as the Know-Nothing movement. It remained an island of German language and culture in South Jersey for more than 50 years.[19]

Egg Harbor City was incorporated as a city by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on June 14, 1858, from portions of Galloway Township and Mullica Township. The city was reincorporated on February 13, 1868.[20]

Geography[edit]

Egg Harbor City is located at 39°33′49″N 74°35′45″W / 39.563687°N 74.595865°W / 39.563687; -74.595865 (39.563687,-74.595865). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 11.438 square miles (29.625 km2), of which, 10.932 square miles (28.314 km2) of it was land and 0.506 square miles (1.311 km2) of it (4.42%) was water.[1][2]

The city borders Mullica Township and Galloway Township in Atlantic County, and Washington Township in Burlington County.

The city is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve.[21] All of the city is included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Atlantic County, along with areas in Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.[22]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
1860789
18701,31166.2%
18801,232−6.0%
18901,43916.8%
19001,80825.6%
19102,18120.6%
19202,62220.2%
19303,47832.6%
19403,5893.2%
19503,8386.9%
19604,41615.1%
19704,304−2.5%
19804,6187.3%
19904,583−0.8%
20004,545−0.8%
20104,243−6.6%
Est. 20124,299[10]1.3%
Population sources:
1860-2000[23] 1860-1920[24]
1860-1870[25] 1870[26]
1880-1890[27] 1890-1910[28]
1910-1930[29] 1930-1990[30]
2000[31][32] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 4,243 people, 1,593 households, and 1,075 families residing in the city. The population density was 388.1 per square mile (149.8 /km2). There were 1,736 housing units at an average density of 158.8 per square mile (61.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 62.95% (2,671) White, 17.94% (761) Black or African American, 0.38% (16) Native American, 2.22% (94) Asian, 0.09% (4) Pacific Islander, 12.28% (521) from other races, and 4.15% (176) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 26.28% (1,115) of the population.[7]

There were 1,593 households of which 30.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.0% were married couples living together, 21.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.5% were non-families. 25.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.13.[7]

In the city, 24.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 10.5% from 18 to 24, 25.9% from 25 to 44, 26.9% from 45 to 64, and 11.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.4 years. For every 100 females there were 96.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.9 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $52,893 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,582) and the median family income was $67,654 (+/- $6,555). Males had a median income of $35,182 (+/- $7,553) versus $33,994 (+/- $2,214) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $22,294 (+/- $3,702). About 11.3% of families and 20.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 36.2% of those under age 18 and 12.7% of those age 65 or over.[33]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 4,545 people, 1,658 households, and 1,150 families residing in the city. The population density was 409.2 people per square mile (158.0/km2). There were 1,770 housing units at an average density of 159.4/sq mi (61.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 66.80% White, 14.19% African American, 0.37% Native American, 1.25% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 13.49% from other races, and 3.81% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 24.55% of the population.[31][32]

There were 1,658 households out of which 34.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.7% were married couples living together, 20.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.6% were non-families. 24.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.20.[31][32]

In the city the population was spread out with 28.3% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 29.7% from 25 to 44, 19.6% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 93.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.9 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the city was $32,956, and the median income for a family was $40,040. Males had a median income of $27,978 versus $23,560 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,151. About 11.7% of families and 13.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.5% of those under age 18 and 15.5% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

The City of Egg Harbor City is governed within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) under the Small Municipality Plan. The elected officials that head the government are a mayor and nine council members all elected at-large in partisan elections. The mayor is elected to a four-year term of office. City Council members are elected to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with three seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[5][34]

The mayor is the statutory head of the Police department and the Chief Executive Officer of the City. The City Council makes local laws, sets an agenda pertaining to the direction that the governments programs and approves budgets for various programs. The City Administrator takes the elected officials programs and sets policy and procedures in order to carry out the day-to-day operations of the municipality. The City Administrator also deals with Federal, State, County and neighbor Municipal officials to implement the community's needs.

As of 2013, the Mayor of Egg Harbor City is Democrat Lisa Jiampetti, whose four-year term of office ends on December 31, 2016. Members of the City Council are Council President Edward D. Dennis (D, 2015), President Pro Tempore Hazel Mueller (D, 2014), Douglas Dickinson (D, 2015), Ina Duran (D, 2014), Clifford Mays, Jr. (D, 2014), Albert "Pat" Moran (D, 2013), Elizabeth "Betty" Schoenstein (D, 2013), Joseph Speyerer (R, 2013) and Mason Wright, Jr. (D, 2015).[35][36][37][38][39]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Egg Harbor City is located in the 2nd Congressional District[40] and is part of New Jersey's 2nd state legislative district.[8][41][42]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[44][45] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[46][47]

The 2nd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jim Whelan (D, Atlantic City) and in the General Assembly by Chris A. Brown (R, Ventnor City) and John F. Amodeo (D, Northfield).[48] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[49] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[50]

Atlantic County is governed by a County Executive directly chosen by voters, with the county's legislature, the Board of Chosen Freeholders, consisting of nine members elected to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with three seats coming up for election each year; four of its members are elected at-large and there are five election districts, each of which elect a single member.[51][52] The County Executive is Dennis Levinson (Linwood, term ends December 31, 2015.[53] As of 2013, Atlantic County's Freeholders are the four at-large members; Colin G. Bell (Northfield, 2015)[54], Alexander C. Marino (Linwood, 2014)[55], Vice Chairman Joseph J. McDevitt (Ventnor City, 2013)[56] and John W. Risley (Northfield, 2014)[57]; and five district members elected from District 1 (Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part) and Pleasantville) Charles T. Garrett (Atlantic City, 2013)[58], District 2 - (Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part), Longport, Margate City, Somers Point and Ventnor City), Chairman Frank D. Formica (Atlantic City, 2015)[59], District 3 (Egg Harbor Township (part), Hamilton Township (part), Linwood and Northfield) - Frank Sutton (Egg Harbor Township, 2014)[60], District 4 (Absecon, Brigantine, Galloway Township and Port Republic - Richard Dase (Galloway Township, 2013)[61] and District 5 (Buena Borough, Buena Vista Township, Corbin City, Egg Harbor City, Estell Manor, Folsom, Hamilton Township (part), Hammonton, Mullica Township and Weymouth Township) - James A. Bertino (Hammonton, 2015).[62][51]

Education[edit]

The Egg Harbor City School District is responsible for education of public school children in pre-Kindergarten through Eighth Grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[63]) are Charles L. Spragg School[64] with 215 students in pre-K to Grade 3 and Egg Harbor City Community School[65] with 240 students in grades 4 to 8.[66]

Students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Cedar Creek High School, which is located in the northern section of Egg Harbor City and opened to students in September 2010.[67] The school is one of three high schools operated as part of the Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District, which also includes the constituent municipalities of Egg Harbor City, Galloway Township, Hamilton Township and Mullica Township, and participates in sending/receiving relationships with Port Republic and Washington Township (Burlington County).[68] Cedar Creek High School is zoned to serve students from Egg Harbor City, Mullica Township, Port Republic and Washington Township, while students in portions of Galloway and Hamilton townships have the opportunity to attend Cedar Creek through the school of choice program or through attendance in magnet programs offered at Cedar Creek.[69][70]

Township public school students are also eligible to attend the Atlantic County Institute of Technology[71] or the Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts, located in Somers Point.[72]

The Pilgrim Academy is a private Christian school. Founded by Dr. Warren Allem in 1971, the school teaches children from Kindergarten through 12th Grade. The name is taken from John Bunyan's allegorical novel The Pilgrim's Progress.[73]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The city had a total of 50.09 miles (80.61 km) of roadways, of which 34.05 miles (54.80 km) are maintained by the municipality, 14.46 miles (23.27 km) by Atlantic County and 1.58 miles (2.54 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[74]

The White Horse Pike passes through Egg Harbor City, which intersects with the northern terminus of New Jersey Route 50.[75] Also passing through are County Route 561 and County Route 563.

The closest limited access road is the Atlantic City Expressway which is two towns away in Hamilton Township while the Garden State Parkway is accessible in neighboring Galloway Township.

Public transportation[edit]

The Egg Harbor City station[76] provides New Jersey Transit service on the Atlantic City Line, connecting 30th Street Station in Philadelphia and the Atlantic City Rail Terminal in Atlantic City.[77]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service to and from Atlantic City on the 554 route.[78] The South Jersey Transportation Authority provides shuttle bus service connecting the Egg Harbor City train station with Atlantic City International Airport and Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, as well as other area locations.[79]

Wineries[edit]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Egg Harbor City include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Departments & Services, Egg Harbor City. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 13.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: City of Egg Harbor City, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Egg Harbor City city, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 2. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Egg Harbor City city, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Egg Harbor City, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Egg Harbor City, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  19. ^ Egg Harbor City: New Germany In New Jersey
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 68. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  21. ^ The Pinelands National Reserve, New Jersey Pinelands Commission. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  22. ^ Pinelands Municipalities, New Jersey Pinelands Commission, April 2003. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  23. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Atlantic County Municipalities, 1840 - 2000, WestJersey.org. December 6, 2010. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  24. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  25. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 273, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 10, 2013. "Egg Harbor City is between Galloway and Mullica townships, and contained in 1860, 789 inhabitants and in 1870 1,311. It is a thriving German settlement in which grapes and strawberries are extensively cultivated."
  26. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  27. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  28. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  29. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  30. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  31. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Egg Harbor City city, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  32. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Egg Harbor City city, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  33. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Egg Harbor City city, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  34. ^ Egg Harbor City Government, Egg Harbor City, backed up by the Internet Archive as of April 12, 2010. Accessed February 4, 2013.
  35. ^ Mayor & Common Council, Egg Harbor City. Accessed January 14, 2012.
  36. ^ Municipal Governments in Atlantic County, Atlantic County, New Jersey, last updated October 31, 2013. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  37. ^ Result.htm Atlantic County General Election November 6, 2012, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  38. ^ Result.htm Atlantic County General Election November 8, 2011, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  39. ^ Result.htm Atlantic County General Election November 2, 2010, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  40. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 57, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  44. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  45. ^ via Associated Press. "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in", NJ.com, October 31, 2013. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  46. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  47. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  48. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 15, 2014.
  49. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  51. ^ a b Board of Chosen Freeholders, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  52. ^ Atlantic County District Map 2013, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  53. ^ County Executive Dennis Levinson, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  54. ^ Colin G. Bell, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  55. ^ Alexander C. Marino, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  56. ^ Joseph C. McDevitt, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  57. ^ John W. Risley, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  58. ^ Charles T. Garrett, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  59. ^ Frank D. Formica, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  60. ^ Frank Sutton, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  61. ^ Richard Dase, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  62. ^ James A. Bertino, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  63. ^ School Data for the Egg Harbor City School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed May 23, 2011.
  64. ^ Charles L. Spragg School, Egg Harbor City School District. Accessed August 12, 2013.
  65. ^ Egg Harbor City Community School, Egg Harbor City School District. Accessed August 12, 2013.
  66. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Egg Harbor City School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 12, 2013.
  67. ^ Cedar Creek High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 24, 2013. "Cedar Creek High School opened its doors for the first time September 7, 2010 with only 9th and 10th grade students. For the 2011/2012 school year, we grew to include grades 9 through 11. Serving students from six communities within the Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District, Cedar Creek will function fully as a four-year, comprehensive high school for the 2012/2013 school year."
  68. ^ Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 24, 2013. "The Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District serves the communities of Galloway Township, Hamilton Township, Egg Harbor City, Mullica Township and participates in receiving relationships with Port Republic and Washington Township."
  69. ^ Student Population, Cedar Creek High School. Accessed October 24, 2013. "We will serve as the high school for the communities of Mullica Township, Egg Harbor City, Port Republic, and the Green Bank area of Washington Township. Students from specific geographic areas of Galloway and Hamilton Townships (School of Choice Program) and the entirety of Galloway and Hamilton Townships through the Magnet Programs (Engineering and Environmental Sciences) will have the option of attending CCHS."
  70. ^ Policy 5120 Assignment of Pupils, Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District. Accessed October 24, 2013. "Pupils shall attend the school located in the attendance area of their residence. The attendance areas for the Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District shall be as follows: 1. Pupils who reside in Egg Harbor City shall attend Cedar Creek High School. 2. Pupils who reside in Galloway Township shall attend Absegami High School. 3. Pupils who reside in Hamilton Township shall attend Oakcrest High School 4. Pupils who reside in Mullica Township shall attend Cedar Creek High School 5. Pupils who reside in Port Republic and Washington Township shall attend Cedar Creek High School."
  71. ^ Mission, Atlantic County Institute of Technology. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  72. ^ Profile, Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  73. ^ About TPA, The Pilgrim Academy. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  74. ^ Atlantic County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  75. ^ U.S. Route 30 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  76. ^ Egg Harbor City station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  77. ^ Atlantic City Rail Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  78. ^ Atlantic County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  79. ^ Egg Harbor City Rail Station, South Jersey Transportation Authority. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  80. ^ Nelson, Jennifer L. "Poker Face: Life as a professional poker player.", New Jersey Monthly, December 19, 2007. Accessed January 4, 2010. "It wasn't long ago that Egg Harbor resident John D’Agostino was winning or losing $100,000 to $200,000 a day playing poker."
  81. ^ Louis “Commodore” Kuehnle, Atlantic City Free Public Library, The Atlantic City Experience. Accessed October 28, 2013. "Born New York City on December 25, 1857, Louis Kuehnle (pronounced “coon-lee”) was the son of Louis and Katrina Kuehnle. A year after his birth, the Kuehnle family moved to Egg Harbor City, New Jersey to enter the hotel business. In 1875 the family moved to Atlantic City to open a hotel in the blossoming resort."
  82. ^ Frank Morgenweck enshrined as contributor in 1962, Basketball Hall of Fame. Accessed July 14, 2007.
  83. ^ "Peace Pilgrim walk July 18 in Egg Harbor", Shore News Today, June 17, 2009. Accessed January 4, 2010. "The event will be held July 18, the 101st anniversary of the birth of Peace Pilgrim, an Egg Harbor City woman who devoted her adult life to spreading her simple, but profound message of peace."
  84. ^ via Associated Press. "Egg Harbor City woman crowned Miss New Jersey", The Star-Ledger, June 17, 2012. Accessed December 13, 2012. "Lindsey Petrosh of Egg Harbor City won the title Saturday night at the Ocean City Music Pier, beating out 24 other contestants."
  85. ^ Roncace, Kelly. "Lindsey Petrosh, Miss New Jersey 2012 is a graduate student at Rowan University", South Jersey Times, June 23, 2012. Accessed November 17, 2013. "Lindsey Petrosh, a 23-year-old Rowan University graduate student, won’t be watching the Miss America pageant in January the way she has since she was a toddler.... 'I’m still pinching myself,' the Egg Harbor City resident said."
  86. ^ Bigelow, Williard. The Composition of American Wines, p. 18. Applewood Books, 2007. ISBN 9781429010337. Accessed October 28, 2013.

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