Edward Oliver LeBlanc

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

 
Jump to: navigation, search

Edward Oliver Le Blanc (October 3, 1923 – October 29, 2004) was a Dominican politician.

Le Blanc was born in Vieille Case. He joined the Dominica Labour Party in 1957. He joined the government of the Federation of the West Indies in Trinidad in 1960, but returned to Dominica later that year to become the leader of his party. He won a seat in the House of Assembly in 1961.

Le Blanc served as chief minister of Dominica from January 1961 to March 1, 1967. In March 1967, when the British granted Dominica more self-government, Le Blanc became premier.

Le Blanc tried to implement socialist policies in Dominica. He was committed to helping poor workers, whom he called "little men", a catchphrase which still remains in Dominican politics. He was very popular with the voters, winning three elections in three different constituencies, and is believed by many to be one of the founders of the Dominican nation. He unexpectedly resigned on July 27, 1974, and retired from politics and public life. He did not explain his retirement, and refused to give interviews, but it is believed that he was tired of the opposition to his policies by many in the government. He returned to Vieille Case, where he died.

Preceded by
Frank Baron
Chief Minister of Dominica
1961–1967
Succeeded by
Himself as Premier
Preceded by
Himself as Chief Minister
Premier of Dominica
March 1, 1967 – July 27, 1974
Succeeded by
Patrick John