East Liverpool, Ohio

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East Liverpool, Ohio
City
East Liverpool from the air, looking south.
Nickname(s): The Pottery Capital of the World
Motto: "City Of Action"
Location of East Liverpool, Ohio
Coordinates: 40°37′43″N 80°34′9″W / 40.62861°N 80.56917°W / 40.62861; -80.56917Coordinates: 40°37′43″N 80°34′9″W / 40.62861°N 80.56917°W / 40.62861; -80.56917
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyColumbiana
Government
 • MayorJames P. Swoger
Area[1]
 • Total4.76 sq mi (12.33 km2)
 • Land4.56 sq mi (11.81 km2)
 • Water0.20 sq mi (0.52 km2)
Elevation[2]768 ft (234 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total11,195
 • Estimate (2012[4])11,062
 • Density2,455.0/sq mi (947.9/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code43920
Area code(s)330, 234
FIPS code39-23730[5]
GNIS feature ID1061038[2]
Websitehttp://www.eastliverpool.com/
 
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East Liverpool, Ohio
City
East Liverpool from the air, looking south.
Nickname(s): The Pottery Capital of the World
Motto: "City Of Action"
Location of East Liverpool, Ohio
Coordinates: 40°37′43″N 80°34′9″W / 40.62861°N 80.56917°W / 40.62861; -80.56917Coordinates: 40°37′43″N 80°34′9″W / 40.62861°N 80.56917°W / 40.62861; -80.56917
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyColumbiana
Government
 • MayorJames P. Swoger
Area[1]
 • Total4.76 sq mi (12.33 km2)
 • Land4.56 sq mi (11.81 km2)
 • Water0.20 sq mi (0.52 km2)
Elevation[2]768 ft (234 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total11,195
 • Estimate (2012[4])11,062
 • Density2,455.0/sq mi (947.9/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code43920
Area code(s)330, 234
FIPS code39-23730[5]
GNIS feature ID1061038[2]
Websitehttp://www.eastliverpool.com/

East Liverpool is a city in Columbiana County, Ohio, United States. The population was 11,195 at the time of the 2010 census. It is located along the Ohio River and borders the states of Pennsylvania and West Virginia. East Liverpool is a principal city of the East Liverpool-Salem Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Columbiana County.

Historically referred to as the "Pottery Capital of the World" due to the large number of potteries in the city,[6][7] although there are now just three in the area. The city is also known as the hometown of former University of Notre Dame football coach Lou Holtz, and as the city to which the body of bank robber Pretty Boy Floyd was taken for embalming. The Beginning Point of the U.S. Public Land Survey is just east of the city center, on the Ohio-Pennsylvania border.

History[edit]

East Liverpool traces its beginning to 1798 when Thomas Fawcett purchased 1,100 acres of land along the Ohio River in what was then Jefferson County. In 1802 he platted the town of St. Clair, named for Arthur St. Clair, who at that time was Governor of the Northwest Territory. It was called Fawcettstown for a time by the residents. In 1816, the name was changed to Liverpool. It was incorporated as East Liverpool in 1834 when a Liverpool in western Ohio (now defunct) protested the use of its name by this newer town.

The Hall China Company.

James Bennett, an English potter, established the pottery industry in East Liverpool, and it became the community's leading employer. East Liverpool became known as "The Crockery City." East Liverpool once produced more than half of the United States's annual ceramics output. Throughout East Liverpool's ceramics history there were more than 300 potteries. Of these, three remain: The Hall China Company, the Homer Laughlin China Company (located across the Ohio River in Newell, West Virginia) and Pioneer Pottery.

East Liverpool also produced most of the yellowware pottery used in the United States in the mid-19th century.

Among the most famous of East Liverpool's ceramics was the porcelain known as Lotus Ware. Produced by Knowles, Taylor & Knowles in the 1890s, this Moorish- and Persian-influenced artware swept the competition at the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago. It is generally considered to be the finest porcelain ever produced in the US. The Museum of Ceramics in downtown East Liverpool has the world's largest public display of Lotus Ware.

Since the mid-1960s or so, East Liverpool's pottery industry has steadily declined. This has been because pottery workers in less-developed countries paid less than American workers, and consequently the products are cheaper.

In the mid-1990s, the city renovated its downtown district, with Great Depression-era lightposts, a new center of town called Devon's Diamond, and the reconstruction of the old High School's clocktower, which is now home of the East Liverpool High School Alumni Association.

Areas and neighborhoods[edit]

Satellite communities[edit]

Though not located within the city limits, there are a few communities that share East Liverpool's 43920 ZIP code and therefore have an East Liverpool mailing address. They are the census-designated places of Calcutta, Glenmoor and La Croft and the unincorporated community of Fredericktown.

Neighboring communities[edit]

Though in the bordering states of West Virginia and Pennsylvania, the communities of Chester and Newell, West Virginia and Glasgow, Pennsylvania owe their existence to East Liverpool's rapid population growth of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Education[edit]

Primary and secondary[edit]

Children in East Liverpool (and immediate surrounding areas in Liverpool and St. Clair Townships) are served by the East Liverpool City School District. The current schools in the district are:

The parochial St. Aloysius School (K-8) and American Spirt Academy (formerly known as the East Liverpool Christian School, K-12) also serve area students, as well as an online school, Buckeye Online School for Success.

Postsecondary[edit]

Kent State University opened a regional campus, Kent State University at East Liverpool, in 1965. It is located at 400 East 4th Street, in the old East Liverpool High School building. There is an additional building, the Mary Patterson Building, located down the street. The Ohio Valley College of Technology in nearby Calcutta, Ohio focuses on job training.

Transportation[edit]

Highways[edit]

Bridges[edit]

Since the 1890s, East Liverpool and the West Virginia communities of Chester and Newell have been connected by three different bridges spanning the Ohio River.

Recreation[edit]

Golf Course[edit]

Parks[edit]

There are two public parks located within East Liverpool city limits.

Additionally, Beaver Creek State Park is located outside the city limits but partially within the 43920 ZIP code area.

Athletics[edit]

Because of its size, East Liverpool has never had a major professional sports team. However, during the city's heyday, many semipro and company teams and city and area leagues existed. Baseball, basketball and American football were all popular among residents, and games attracted many patrons. The semipro East Liverpool Potters basketball team of the Central Basketball League played in the city from 1906 to 1909. No semipro or company teams exist in the city today.

East Liverpool High School athletics have been consistently popular among students and residents in the past 100-plus years. All of the teams are known as the Potters. Currently, the school fields American football, baseball, basketball, bowling, cross country running, golf, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, track and field, volleyball and wrestling teams. Most of these teams have had team and/or individual successes in their existences. Athletic facilities include:

Media[edit]

Geography[edit]

Spliced panoramic photo of East Liverpool, Ohio, from the east, taken August 11, 2000.

East Liverpool is located at 40°37′43″N 80°34′9″W / 40.62861°N 80.56917°W / 40.62861; -80.56917 (40.628510, -80.569063).[12] It lies within the ecoregion of the Western Allegheny Plateau.[13]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.76 square miles (12.33 km2), of which, 4.56 square miles (11.81 km2) is land and 0.20 square miles (0.52 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
1850987
18601,30832.5%
18702,10560.9%
18805,568164.5%
189010,95696.8%
190016,48550.5%
191020,38723.7%
192021,4115.0%
193023,3299.0%
194023,5551.0%
195024,2172.8%
196022,306−7.9%
197026,24317.6%
198016,517−37.1%
199013,654−17.3%
200013,089−4.1%
201011,195−14.5%
Est. 201211,062−1.2%
Sources:[14][15][5][16]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 11,195 people, 4,601 households, and 2,892 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,455.0 inhabitants per square mile (947.9 /km2). There were 5,316 housing units at an average density of 1,165.8 per square mile (450.1 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 91.7% White, 4.6% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.3% from other races, and 3.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.1% of the population.

There were 4,601 households of which 33.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.0% were married couples living together, 20.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 37.1% were non-families. 31.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.97.

The median age in the city was 37.6 years. 25.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24% were from 25 to 44; 26.5% were from 45 to 64; and 14.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.6% male and 52.4% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 13,089 people, 5,261 households, and 3,424 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,010.3 people per square mile (1,161.8/km²). There were 5,743 housing units at an average density of 1,320.8 per square mile (509.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 92.85% White, 4.81% African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.08% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.21% from other races, and 1.76% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.72% of the population.

There were 5,261 households out of which 32.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.5% were married couples living together, 16.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.9% were non-families. 30.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.1% under the age of 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 27.3% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 16.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 86.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $23,138, and the median income for a family was $27,500. Males had a median income of $27,346 versus $18,990 for females. The per capita income for the city was $12,656. About 21.5% of families and 25.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 35.2% of those under age 18 and 13.0% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ Museum of Ceramics
  7. ^ City of Easter Liverpool Website
  8. ^ [1][dead link]
  9. ^ a b Judith A Allison, Webmaster@eastliverpoolhistoricalsociety.org. "ELHistSoc - Memorable East Liverpool Dates". Eastliverpoolhistoricalsociety.org. Retrieved 2013-09-28. 
  10. ^ [2][dead link]
  11. ^ Judith A Allison, Webmaster@eastliverpoolhistoricalsociety.org. "ELHistSoc - Memorable East Liverpool Dates". Eastliverpoolhistoricalsociety.org. Retrieved 2013-09-28. 
  12. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  13. ^ "Level III Ecoregions of Ohio". National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Retrieved 28 September 2013. 
  14. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio". 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  15. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  16. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 

Adler, Jerry. “It’s not easy being green.” Newsweek 28 Feb. 1992. EBSCOhost. Web. 17 Apr. 2010.

Jones, Arthur. “Toxic-waste incinerator in the backyard: White House and church steer clear in Ohio.” National Catholic Reporter 18 Feb. 1994: 5+. Academic OneFile. Web. 17 Apr. 2010.

External links[edit]