Drury University

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Drury University
Drury University Logo.png
Established1873
TypePrivate university
Religious affiliationUnited Church of Christ
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
Endowment$74.1 million[1]
PresidentDr. David Manuel
Students5,474 [2]
Undergraduates1,560
Postgraduates3,914
LocationSpringfield, MO, USA
37°13′11″N 93°17′09″W / 37.2196°N 93.2857°W / 37.2196; -93.2857Coordinates: 37°13′11″N 93°17′09″W / 37.2196°N 93.2857°W / 37.2196; -93.2857
CampusUrban, 88 acres (35.6 ha)
ColorsScarlet and Grey          
NicknamePanthers
Websitewww.drury.edu
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Drury University
Drury University Logo.png
Established1873
TypePrivate university
Religious affiliationUnited Church of Christ
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
Endowment$74.1 million[1]
PresidentDr. David Manuel
Students5,474 [2]
Undergraduates1,560
Postgraduates3,914
LocationSpringfield, MO, USA
37°13′11″N 93°17′09″W / 37.2196°N 93.2857°W / 37.2196; -93.2857Coordinates: 37°13′11″N 93°17′09″W / 37.2196°N 93.2857°W / 37.2196; -93.2857
CampusUrban, 88 acres (35.6 ha)
ColorsScarlet and Grey          
NicknamePanthers
Websitewww.drury.edu

Drury University is a private liberal arts college in Springfield, Missouri. The university enrolls about 1,600 undergraduates, 450 graduate students in six master's programs, and 3,160 students in the College of Continuing Professional Studies.[3]

Established in 1873, Drury is consistently ranked among the best liberal arts universities in the American Midwest. In 2013, the Drury Panthers Men's Basketball team won the NCAA Division II Championships.

History[edit]

Drury was founded as Springfield College in 1873 by Congregationalist church missionaries in the mold of other Congregationalist universities such as Dartmouth College and Yale University. Rev. Nathan Morrison, Samuel Drury, and James and Charles Harwood provided the school's initial endowment and organization; Samuel Drury's gift was the largest of the group and the school was soon renamed in honor of Drury's recently deceased son.

The early curriculum emphasized educational, religious, and musical strengths. Students came to the new college from a wide area, including the Indian Territories of Oklahoma. The first graduating class included four women.

When classes began in 1873, they were held in a single building on a campus occupying less than 1 12 acres (0.61 ha). Twenty-five years later the 40-acre (16.2 ha) campus included Stone Chapel, the President’s House and three academic buildings. Today, the university occupies a 115-acre (46.5 ha) campus, including the original historic buildings.

On April 28, 1960, Drury College was the setting for an episode of NBC's The Ford Show, Starring Tennessee Ernie Ford. Tennessee Ernie Ford sang his trademark "Sixteen Tons" and the hymn "Take My Hand, Precious Lord".[4]

Drury College became Drury University on January 1, 2000.[5]

The current president is David P. Manuel, formerly Chancellor of Louisiana State University at Alexandria. He began duties as president on June 1, 2013.

Religious affiliations[edit]

Drury, like Dartmouth and Yale, was founded by Congregationalist missionaries, and like these schools, it is no longer a religious institution. It remains affiliated with the Congregationalist church and its successor, the United Church of Christ. It has also been affiliated with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) since the founding of the Drury School of Religion in 1909.[6]

Academics[edit]

Drury is a mid-size undergraduate and graduate research university, accredited by The Higher Learning Commission.[7] The university offers 54 undergraduate majors[8] and several professional degrees through the Hammons School of Architecture, Breech School of Business Administration, and School of Education & Child Development.

Awards[edit]

Drury has been at or near the top of the U.S. News and World Report "Great Schools at Great Prices" list for the Midwest since 1999, including five years in the #1 slot. It was ranked No. 8 on U.S. News and World Report's Best Regional Universities (Midwest) for 2014. It has been included in Princeton Review's Guide to Green Colleges since 2010. Other accolades include Honorable Mention for Best Liberal Arts School in the Nation by Time Magazine, a top producer of Fulbright Scholars in 2011 according to the Institute of International Education, and one of 13 "Institutions of Excellence" by the Policy Center on the First Year of College.[3]

Housing[edit]

Freshmen are required to live in one of the three residence halls: Smith, Wallace, and Sunderland halls. Smith Hall and Wallace Hall are suite-style double-occupancy rooms, where two rooms share a bathroom. Sunderland Hall has suite-style single-occupancy rooms, with four students and two bathrooms in a suite. Freshmen in Sunderland Hall live in Living Learning Communities (LLC's), which is a group of students who have CORE Class together and are grouped by similar interests.

Students live on campus until they are age 21 or older, or are married. The majority of students live on-campus. Upperclassmen may choose live in university-owned apartments, fraternity houses, or the Summit Park Leadership Community. Summit Park residents (usually sophomores), in teams of four or eight, design a year-long service project and present it to a panel in the year prior in order to earn their spot in one of these 10 apartment units.

Study abroad[edit]

Drury's study abroad program is an integral part of the college experience. Almost half of the student body studies overseas at some point in short-term, semester, or year-long programs.[3] Foreign learning is a requirement for most students with majors in the schools of Business and Architecture.

Drury also maintains a satellite campus in Aigina, Greece that is home to several of the university's most distinctive courses. Though the Center is quite popular with architecture students, it is attended by students across disciplines and majors.[9]

Athletics[edit]

Drury's NCAA Division II intercollegiate athletic teams compete in men's and women's basketball, men's and women's cross country, men's and women's golf, men's and women's soccer, men's and women's swimming, men's and women's tennis, men's baseball, women's softball, and women's volleyball.

The school was a founding member of the Heartland Conference. In the fall of 2005, the Drury Panthers joined the Great Lakes Valley Conference.

Baseball, in hiatus since the 1970s, was reorganized for the 2007 season by new Head Coach Mark Stratton. Also in 2007, Drury men's swimming head coach Brian Reynolds was inducted into the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame.[10]

On April 7, 2013, Drury won the Division II Men's National Championship in Basketball, defeating Metro State of Denver 74-73 after rallying from a 17-point deficit. The Panthers won their final 23 games of the season - a school record - to finish 31-4 on the season. They also captured their second Great Lakes Valley Conference championship and first NCAA Division II Midwest Regional along the way.[11] In keeping with recent custom, the Division II champions were invited to play an exhibition game against Duke University.[12]

Greek organizations[edit]

Drury currently has four sororities and four fraternities.

Sororities:

Fraternities:

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]