Drumcliff

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Drumcliff
Droim Chliabh
—  Village  —
Drumcliff is located in Ireland
Drumcliff
Location in Ireland
Coordinates: 54°20′00″N 8°30′00″W / 54.3333°N 8.5000°W / 54.3333; -8.5000Coordinates: 54°20′00″N 8°30′00″W / 54.3333°N 8.5000°W / 54.3333; -8.5000
CountryIreland
ProvinceConnacht
CountyCounty Sligo
Elevation8 m (26 ft)
Irish Grid ReferenceG675428
 
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Drumcliff
Droim Chliabh
—  Village  —
Drumcliff is located in Ireland
Drumcliff
Location in Ireland
Coordinates: 54°20′00″N 8°30′00″W / 54.3333°N 8.5000°W / 54.3333; -8.5000Coordinates: 54°20′00″N 8°30′00″W / 54.3333°N 8.5000°W / 54.3333; -8.5000
CountryIreland
ProvinceConnacht
CountyCounty Sligo
Elevation8 m (26 ft)
Irish Grid ReferenceG675428
The grave of W. B. Yeats in Drumcliff Cemetery
The round tower in Drumcliff
Celtic High cross in Drumcliff Cemetery

Drumcliff[1] or Drumcliffe (Irish: Droim Chliabh, meaning "ridge of the baskets") is a village in County Sligo, Ireland. It is 8 km north of Sligo town on the N15 road between Ben Bulben and the sea.

Contents

History

The village is shown on Ptolemy's map of Ireland as Nagnata and was once a thriving town, as John Butler Yeats remarked in a letter to his son W B Y in 1913: "My father, tho' a low Churchman, hated Presbyterianism and Presbyterians. Why? Because he knew like members of his own family the Catholic peasants of Drumcliff. In his time there were forty houses between the rectory gate and the round tower, now there is only one. In my grandfather's time he & the parish priest were friends. Maynooth did not exist, and the priest was educated in the liberal atmosphere of a French College, and possibly both of them read Voltaire and Gibbon. One of the peasants told me he remembered the priest getting up a bonfire to celebrate my grandfather's return to the parish from a protracted sojourn in Dublin".

The village is best known for its round tower dating from the 10th or 11th century and as the final resting place of the poet W. B. Yeats (1865–1939), who is buried in the graveyard of St. Columba's Church of Ireland church. Although Yeats died in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France in January 1939, his remains were brought home to Ireland by the Irish Naval Service and re-interred at Drumcliff in 1948 in the presence of a large number of local people and dignitaries which included the Minister for External Affairs, Seán MacBride, who represented the Government.[2]

St. Colmcille founded a monastery in Drumcliff in about 575[citation needed] and the village is also famous for its Irish High Cross dating to the 9th century,[citation needed] which stands in the grounds of the former abbey. Across the road is the stump of a Round Tower, which was struck by lightning in 1396."Celtic High Cross at Drumcliff". http://www.a-wee-bit-of-ireland.com/eire_2007/drumcliff_cross_2.html. 

Industry

In March 2009, Mac Aviation, a company having its address at Cloonmull House, Drumcliff was charged by the US Justice Department with illegally (according to US law) exporting aircraft parts and engines to Iran. Among the alleged recipients of these parts was an Iranian military firm that US authorities claim is involved in a disputed nuclear and ballistic missile programme.[3]

See also

References

External links