Don Juan (1926 film)

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Don Juan
DonJuanP.jpg
Directed byAlan Crosland
Produced byWarner Brothers
Written byMaude Fulton (intertitles)
Bess Meredyth (scenario)
StarringJohn Barrymore
Mary Astor
Warner Oland
Music byWilliam Axt
David Mendoza
CinematographyByron Haskin
Editing byHarold McCord
Distributed byWarner Bros.
Release dates
  • August 6, 1926 (1926-08-06)
Running time110 min.
CountryUnited States
LanguageSilent film
English intertitles
 
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Don Juan
DonJuanP.jpg
Directed byAlan Crosland
Produced byWarner Brothers
Written byMaude Fulton (intertitles)
Bess Meredyth (scenario)
StarringJohn Barrymore
Mary Astor
Warner Oland
Music byWilliam Axt
David Mendoza
CinematographyByron Haskin
Editing byHarold McCord
Distributed byWarner Bros.
Release dates
  • August 6, 1926 (1926-08-06)
Running time110 min.
CountryUnited States
LanguageSilent film
English intertitles
First-nighters posing for the camera outside the Warners' Theater before the premiere of "Don Juan" with John Barrymore (6 August 1926)

Don Juan (1926) is a Warner Brothers film, directed by Alan Crosland. It was the first feature-length film with synchronized Vitaphone sound effects and musical soundtrack, though it has no spoken dialogue. The production, which premiered in New York City on August 6, 1926, stars John Barrymore as the hand-kissing womanizer. It is the film with the most kisses in the film history, with Barrymore kissing 191 different women in the film. [1]

Plot[edit]

If there was one thing that Don Juan de Marana learned from his father Don Jose, it was that women gave you three things - life, disillusionment and death. In his father's case it was his wife, Donna Isobel, and Donna Elvira who supplied the latter. Don Juan settled in Rome after attending the University of Pisa. Rome was run by the tyrannical Borgia family consisting of Caesar, Lucrezia and their evil cousin Count Donati.

Juan has his way with and was pursued by many women, but it is the one that he could not have that haunts him. It will be for her that he suffers the wrath of Borgia for ignoring Lucrezia and then killing Count Donati in a duel. For Adriana, they will both be condemned to death in the prison on the river Tiber.[2]

Cast[edit]

Sound recording[edit]

George Groves, on assignment to Vitaphone, was charged with recording the soundtrack to the film. He devised an innovative, multi-microphone technique and performed a live mix of the 107-strong orchestra. In doing so he became the first music mixer in film history. The music was played by the New York Philharmonic.

References[edit]

External links[edit]