Domestic long-haired cat

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Domestic long-haired cat
Chat mi-long.jpg
An orange tabby domestic long-haired cat
Alternative namesDomestic Longhair (DLH)
Originworldwide
Common nicknameslong-haired moggie or mutt
Variety statusNot recognised by any major breed registry.
Notes
Like the domestic short-haired cat, this is not a breed, but a non-breed classification of mixed-breed cats.
Domestic cat (Felis catus)
 
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Domestic long-haired cat
Chat mi-long.jpg
An orange tabby domestic long-haired cat
Alternative namesDomestic Longhair (DLH)
Originworldwide
Common nicknameslong-haired moggie or mutt
Variety statusNot recognised by any major breed registry.
Notes
Like the domestic short-haired cat, this is not a breed, but a non-breed classification of mixed-breed cats.
Domestic cat (Felis catus)


A domestic long-haired cat cat of mixed ancestry – thus not belonging to any particular recognised cat breed – possessing a coat of semi-long to long fur. In the cat fancy, such cats are designated Domestic Longhair (DLH), a pseudo-breed, for registry classification purposes (uncommonly, some such cats are actually pedigreed). In British English, they are often referred to as long-haired moggies. Domestic long-haired cats should not be confused with the British Longhair, American Longhair or other breeds with "Longhair" names, which are formal breeds recognised by some registries.

This DLH appears to be of partial Persian ancestry, with a relatively flat nose and fine hair.

Domestic long-haireds come in all the standard cat colours including tabby, tortie, bi-coloured, smoke etc. A non-pedigree short-haired cat is termed a domestic short-haired cat.

Some long-haired cats are not able to maintain their own coat, which may be prone to matting, and must be frequently groomed by a human. The matted fur will usually accumulate in the under-arm areas and upper leg region of a long-haired cat, and in extreme circumstances can inhibit the cat's movements and cause irritation, and even cause the cat to become caught on outside shrubs and trees. When this occurs, the cat's forceful attempts to break away can pull large amounts of clumped fur away, leaving bald areas and possible injuries.

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