Dog Pound (film)

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Dog Pound
Dog Pound.jpg
French theatrical poster
Directed byKim Chapiron
Produced byKim Chapiron
Georges Bermann
Written byKim Chapiron
Jeremie Delon
StarringAdam Butcher
Shane Kippel
Mateo Morales
CinematographyAndre Chemetoff
Edited byBenjamin Weill
Production
  company
Canal+
Téléfilm Canada
Distributed byFrance:
Mars Distribution
United Kingdom:
Optimum Releasing
United States:
Tribeca Film
Release date(s)
  • 24 April 2010 (2010-04-24) (Tribeca)
  • 23 June 2010 (2010-06-23) (France)
  • 7 September 2010 (2010-09-07) (Canada)
Running time91 minutes[1]
CountryCanada
France
United Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
Spanish
 
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Dog Pound
Dog Pound.jpg
French theatrical poster
Directed byKim Chapiron
Produced byKim Chapiron
Georges Bermann
Written byKim Chapiron
Jeremie Delon
StarringAdam Butcher
Shane Kippel
Mateo Morales
CinematographyAndre Chemetoff
Edited byBenjamin Weill
Production
  company
Canal+
Téléfilm Canada
Distributed byFrance:
Mars Distribution
United Kingdom:
Optimum Releasing
United States:
Tribeca Film
Release date(s)
  • 24 April 2010 (2010-04-24) (Tribeca)
  • 23 June 2010 (2010-06-23) (France)
  • 7 September 2010 (2010-09-07) (Canada)
Running time91 minutes[1]
CountryCanada
France
United Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
Spanish

Dog Pound is a 2010 Canadian drama-thriller film directed by Kim Chapiron;[2] Chapiron co-wrote the screenplay with Jeremie Delon.

The film is highly influenced by the British borstal film, Scum.[3]

Plot[edit]

Butch, Davis, and Angel are teenage criminals who have been sentenced to the Enola Vale Correctional Facility in Montana. Goodyear, a guard who looks after the young inmates, is tough but fair-minded and urges the youngsters to play by the rules and quietly serve their time so they can earn a second chance on the outside. But the new inmates have to deal with young men who have been in lockup for a while, many of whom have become accustomed to the violence and intimidation of life behind bars. Banks is a hard case who thrives on bullying those smaller and more vulnerable than himself; once he targets Butch, the new inmate starts down a path of retribution from which there is no return.

The focus revolves around Butch, who is imprisoned for attacking and blinding a correctional officer (later revealed to be in self-defense, as the correctional officer is accused of assaulting several other detainees). The film starts with an initial 'bedding in' period where the main characters are briefed by Goodyear about how they should conduct themselves during their incarceration, including the possibility of earning points towards an early release should they behave. Butch initially attempts to conform with the rules. However, Davis finds himself the target of some of the longer term youths who have earned the special privileges reserved for good behavior, but have abused in order to intimidate the other boys.

Butch is eventually attacked by Banks, Loony, and Eckersley, whilst the bullying against Davis increases to the point that he is overdosed with an unrevealed substance given to him by Banks and Loony. Butch is sent to solitude due to his refusal to reveal his attackers. Once he is out he immediately takes revenge against the youths, using Davis as lookout cover, Butch brutally beats Banks with a cup. The event helps establishes Butch's rank within the detention center and offers temporary protection to Davis and some of the other inmates. Butch is then told that the original charges against him will probably be dropped due to the emergence of other witnesses in relation to his attack against the police officer. However, during a routine painting job, Goodyear accidentally kills Angel. At first he was choking Angel then Angel fought back which led to Goodyear throwing Angel into pipes on the wall. Butch is placed in solitary confinement whilst an initial investigation takes place.

While Butch is in solitary, Davis is beaten up and raped by Loony; he tries to contact his mom during the night; the guard at the time denies his request. The next morning, Davis has killed himself feeling hopeless. As a result, the dormitory unit goes on a hunger strike during breakfast. Frank starts an aggressive chant in the cafeteria. After a stare-down across the cafeteria with Loony, Butch loses control and instigates a riot in the cafeteria, during which he beats Loony. The detention officers are overwhelmed and use riot gear, tear gas, and plastic bullets in an attempt to end the riot. Butch escapes outside the building during the confusion, but is taken down violently by the prison officers, who break his legs with their nightsticks while beating him, and dragged back inside while screaming.

Cast[edit]

Release[edit]

Dog Pound premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 24, 2010 and proceeded to a wide theatrical release in France on June 23.

The film is currently available on video streaming system Netflix. Despite the system's alleged PG-13 rating, it is, in actuality, not rated.

Critical reception[edit]

The film was described as "intense" and not suited to the tastes of all viewers by reviewer Perri Nemiroff.[4]

The film received positive reviews; on review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, it holds a 65% "fresh" rating with a 6.2 average- based on 26 reviews.[5] Metacritic shows a 57/100 rating, signifying "mixed or average reviews".[6]

Dog Pound is French director Chapiron's first English-language feature, and the film earned him an award as Best New Narrative Filmmaker at the 2010 Tribeca Film Festival.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "DOG POUND (18)". Optimum Releasing. British Board of Film Classification. 8 June 2010. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 
  2. ^ Xan Brooks (26 August 2010). "Dog Pound". The Guardian. Retrieved 14 September 2012. 
  3. ^ Philip French (29 August 2010). "Dog Pound". The Observer. Retrieved 14 September 2012. 
  4. ^ Perri Nemiroff. "Tribeca Review: Dog Pound". CinemaBlend.com. Cinema Blend LLC. Retrieved 14 September 2012. 
  5. ^ "Dog Pound". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 
  6. ^ "Dog Pound Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 

External links[edit]