Dinakaran

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Dinakaran
175x
TypeDaily newspaper
FormatBroadsheet
Owner(s)Sun Network
Founder(s)K. P. Kandasamy
Founded1977 (1977)
LanguageTamil
HeadquartersChennai, Tamil Nadu
Official websiteDinakaran website
 
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Dinakaran
175x
TypeDaily newspaper
FormatBroadsheet
Owner(s)Sun Network
Founder(s)K. P. Kandasamy
Founded1977 (1977)
LanguageTamil
HeadquartersChennai, Tamil Nadu
Official websiteDinakaran website

Dinakaran (Tamil: தினகரன், pronounced "Dhinakaran") is a Tamil daily newspaper distributed in India. As of March 2010, Dinakaran is the largest Tamil daily newspaper in terms of net paid circulation, which was 1,235,220.[1] In terms of total readership, which was 16,741,000 as of May 2010, it is the second largest.[2] Dinakaran is published from 12 centres in India namely Chennai, Bangalore, New Delhi, Mumbai, Madurai, Coimbatore, Trichy, Salem, Nagercoil, Vellore, Nellai and Pondicherry.

History[edit]

Dinakaran was founded in 1977 by K. P. Kandasamy in support of Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (DMK) when his father-in-law, S. P. Adithanar, chose to support Anna Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam during its split from DMK.[3] In 2005, Dinakaran was acquired from his son K. P. K. Kumaran by Kalanithi Maran's Sun Network.[4]

Controversy[edit]

In 2006 May, Dinakaran ran into a controversy when it published the results of a series of opinion polls which showed politician M. K. Stalin having more approval than his elder brother M. K. Azhagiri. The Madurai office of Dinakaran was fire bombed and three employees were killed.[5] This led to the resignation of Central Minister Dayanidhi Maran, brother of Kalanidhi Maran from the Union Cabinet.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Judy Franko (March 13, 2010). "Tamil daily Dinakaran takes over the lead from Daily Thanthi again". exchange4media.com. Retrieved 7 November 2010. 
  2. ^ Rediff Business Desk (May 5, 2010). "India's 15 most-read newspapers - Rediff.com Business". rediff.com. Retrieved 7 November 2010. 
  3. ^ Jeffrey, Robin (24 March 2000). India's newspaper revolution. C. Hurst & Co. p. 79,80,114,135. ISBN 978-1-85065-383-7. 
  4. ^ "Sun acquires Dinakaran newspapers". rediff.com. Retrieved 7 November 2010. 
  5. ^ "TN: 2 killed as Dinakaran office set afire". Rediff. 9 May 2007. 
  6. ^ "DMK kicks out Dayanidhi, brings in Raja as Minister". CNN-IBN. 15 May 2007.