Devanga

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Devanga
Regions with significant populations
Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Kerala
Languages
Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Malayalam
Religion
Om.svg Hinduism
Related ethnic groups
Thogataveera
 
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Devanga
Regions with significant populations
Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Kerala
Languages
Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Malayalam
Religion
Om.svg Hinduism
Related ethnic groups
Thogataveera

Devangas are a community from South India that traditionally followed the occupation of weaving.

Origins, location and languages[edit]

The caste traces its origins to the sage Devala Maharishi. He is also called Devanga Maharshi, created by Shiva.[1] Nowadays, people following this caste are mostly spread in southern Indian states of Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Orissa, Pondicherry and Tamil Nadu.[1] The majority of them are weavers of silk and cotton clothes. They follow Veerashaivism or shivaite practices and also follow Lingayit practices and consider Viramustis as their traditional preceptors, from whom they take precepts and wear lingam.[1] Devangas and Padmashalis, another weaving community were originally same community and later divided into two communities when Devangas started following Shivite practices and Padmashali continued as Vaishnavites.[2]

Local practices[edit]

Devanga Puranamu[edit]

The Devanga Purana throws light on the early origins of this caste.[5] In c.1532, Devanga people requested Telugu poet Bhadralinga Kavi to write their kulapuranam and Bhadralinga Kavi composed (translated) Devanga Purana in dasimatra-dvipadi.[2]

Occupation[edit]

Devangas are known for good craftsmanship in weawing clothes of all varieties and they weave superfine quality cotton clothes.[1] Weaving the loom is usually done by men whereas women dye the yarn and spin the thread and children assist in looming etc.[1] They are also very good entrepreneurs and expert in marketing the clothes and some of them are also engaged in other trade like vegetables, groceries etc.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Acharya, Prasant Kumar. Sacred Complex of Budhi Santani: Anthropological Approach to Study Hindu Civilization (2003 ed.). New Delhi: Concept Publishing Company. pp. 240–246. ISBN 9788180690495. Retrieved 3 September 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c Swarnalatha, P. (2005). "The Social World of the Weaver". The World of the Weaver in Northern Coromandel, c. 1750 - c. 1850. New Delhi: Orient Blackswan. pp. 39–45. ISBN 9788125028680. 
  3. ^ a b c d Iyer, L K A. The Mysore Tribes and Castes, Vol 3. Mittal Publications. pp. 121, 122. Retrieved 3 August 2012. 
  4. ^ a b Ul Hassan, Syed Siraj (1920). "xxv, Devanga". The Castes and Tribes of H.E.H. the Nizam's Dominions, Volume 1 1. isbn=9788120604889: Asian Educational Services. pp. 162–165. Retrieved 5 August 2012. 
  5. ^ Devangas of Karnataka: A sociological case-study of Kollegal

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]