Deutsch-Asiatische Bank

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

 
Jump to: navigation, search
Deutsch-Asiatische Bank in the Legation Quarter of Beijing.

Deutsch-Asiatische Bank (DAB) (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: huá Yínháng) was a foreign bank in China. Its principal activity was trade financing; but together with English and French banks, it also played a role in the underwriting of bonds for the Chinese government and in the financing of railway construction in China.

History[edit]

Deutsche-Asiatische Bank was founded in Shanghai in 1889 with the participation of Deutsche Bank, one of the largest banks in Germany. It set up branches in Calcutta (1895),[1] Tianjin (1890),[2] Hankou (1897),[3] Tsingtao (1897),[4] Hong Kong (1900),[5] Yokohama (1905),[6] Kobe (1906),[7] Singapore (1906),[8] Peking (1910),[9] Canton (1910)[10] and Tsinan (1914).[11]

In 1906, it received the concession to issue its own banknotes in China. During First World War and the Second World War, its branch network and business activities were destroyed. In 1953, it launched a new beginning in Hamburg. Together with partner banks within the EBIC group, Deutsche Bank subsequently founded "Europäisch-Asiatische Bank" in 1972 (later renamed "European Asian Bank"), which the former Deutsch-Asiatische Bank was merged into. In 1986, the bank was called "Deutsche Bank (Asia)" after the partner banks withdrew from their participations. Between 1987 and 1988, it was then merged into Deutsche Bank.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Branch in Calcutta (now Kolkata). Bankgeschichte.de (8 October 1996). Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  2. ^ Branch in Tientsin (now Tianjin). Bankgeschichte.de (27 October 1945). Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  3. ^ Branch in Hankow (part of Wuhan). Bankgeschichte.de. Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  4. ^ Branch in Tsingtao (now Qindao, German: Tsingtau). Bankgeschichte.de. Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  5. ^ Hong Kong branch. Bankgeschichte.de (1 November 1979). Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  6. ^ Yokohama branch. Bankgeschichte.de. Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  7. ^ Kobe branch. Bankgeschichte.de (15 May 1906). Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  8. ^ Singapore branch. Bankgeschichte.de. Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  9. ^ Branch in Peking (now Beijing). Bankgeschichte.de. Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  10. ^ Branch in Canton (now Guangzhou). Bankgeschichte.de. Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  11. ^ Tsinanfu branch. Bankgeschichte.de. Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  12. ^ Deutsch Bank. Bankgeschichte.de (2 November 2004). Retrieved on 11 January 2012.