Detroit Diesel V8 engine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Detroit Diesel/General Motors V8 Diesel
Detroitdiesel62.JPG
Overview
ManufacturerDetroit Diesel division of GM
Production1982-1993 and 1992-current
Combustion chamber
Displacement6.2L/379cid and 6.5L/395cid
Cylinder bore6.2L: 3.98 in (101 mm); 6.5L: 4.06 in (103 mm)
Piston stroke6.2L: 3.80 in (97 mm); 6.5L: 3.82 in (97 mm)
Cylinder block alloyIron
Cylinder head alloyIron
Valvetrain16 OHV
Compression ratio21.5:1, Marine 18:1
Combustion
TurbochargerBorg-Warner GM-X series, also available naturally aspirated
Fuel system1993 And older-Mechanical rotary pump. 1994 And newer-Electronic rotary pump
Fuel typeDiesel
Chronology
PredecessorLF9 350 cu in (5.7 L) diesel
SuccessorDuramax V8 engine
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Detroit Diesel/General Motors V8 Diesel
Detroitdiesel62.JPG
Overview
ManufacturerDetroit Diesel division of GM
Production1982-1993 and 1992-current
Combustion chamber
Displacement6.2L/379cid and 6.5L/395cid
Cylinder bore6.2L: 3.98 in (101 mm); 6.5L: 4.06 in (103 mm)
Piston stroke6.2L: 3.80 in (97 mm); 6.5L: 3.82 in (97 mm)
Cylinder block alloyIron
Cylinder head alloyIron
Valvetrain16 OHV
Compression ratio21.5:1, Marine 18:1
Combustion
TurbochargerBorg-Warner GM-X series, also available naturally aspirated
Fuel system1993 And older-Mechanical rotary pump. 1994 And newer-Electronic rotary pump
Fuel typeDiesel
Chronology
PredecessorLF9 350 cu in (5.7 L) diesel
SuccessorDuramax V8 engine
Sorry, your browser either has JavaScript disabled or does not have any supported player.
You can download the clip or download a player to play the clip in your browser.

Problems playing this file? See media help.

General Motors introduced a line of Diesel V8 engine engines for their C/K pickup trucks in 1982. This engine family, designed by GM division Detroit Diesel, was produced by GM through 2000, when it was replaced by the new Duramax line. AM General's subsidiary General Engine Products (GEP) still produces a military variant of this engine for the HMMWV.[1]

The General Motors light-truck 6.2 and 6.5 L Diesel engines were optional in all 1982 through 2000 full-size GM pickups, SUVs, and vans: Chevrolet C/K pickup trucks, Chevrolet Suburban, Chevrolet K5 Blazer and its replacement Chevrolet Tahoe, full-size Chevrolet Van and its successor Chevrolet Express, as well as motor homes. The engine was standard on AM General HMMWV, Hummer H1 and the 1980s GM Commercial Utility Cargo Vehicle vehicles.

6.2L[edit]

The original 6.2 L (379 cu in) Diesel V8 was introduced in 1982 for the Chevrolet C/K and was produced until 1993. The 6.2L diesel emerged as a high-MPG alternative to the V8 gasoline engine lineup, and achieved better mileage than the General Motors 4.3L V6 gasoline engines of the 80s, at a time when the market was focused on mileage more than power. However, it was designed to easily install in place of the 7.4L gasoline V8, using the same mounting and attachments for transmissions, and similar radiator size requirements. Overall weight for the complete engine is slightly heavier than the 7.4L gasoline engine.

Applications[edit]

Specifications[edit]

6.5L[edit]

The 6.5 L (395 cu in) version was introduced in 1992 to replace the 6.2. Most 6.5s are equipped with a turbo. This engine was never meant to be a power and torque competitor with Ford/International and Dodge/Cummins, but rather a simply designed workhorse engine that made credible power, achieved decent fuel economy and met emissions standards in half-ton trucks. The Duramax 6600 replaced the 6.5 in light trucks beginning in 2001 and the C3500HD medium duty cab and chassis (replaced by C4500 Kodiak/Topkick) and vans beginning in 2003, but the 6.5 (6500 Optimizer) is still produced by AM General for the HMMWV.

There are several GM 6.5 liter diesel engine production options. The Turbocharged L56, (VIN "S") was used in most light duty 3/4 ton (2500) Heavy duty 3/4 ton and 1 ton trucks used the Turbocharged L65 (VIN "F") engine. The L56 is emissions controlled with EGR and catalytic converters. The L65 engine has no EGR, and has no catalytic converter. There is a soot trap on L65 engines that is often mistaken for a catalytic converter. GM was the first manufacturer to introduce an electronically controlled fuel injection system into a diesel pickup truck.[2] The L49 (VIN "P") and L57 are both naturally aspirated engines. L57 is listed as HO or Heavy Duty. Additional RPO codes are LQM (175HP) and LQN (190HP).

Changes were made by GM to the 6.5 in their light trucks for emissions or reliability improvement. The 1992-1993 model years used a 6.5-specific Stanadyne DB-2 mechanical injection pump. GM replaced the DB-2 with the electronic throttle DS-4 in 1994-2000 vehicles. In mid-1996 GM implemented a redesigned engine cooling system incorporating twin non bypass-blocking thermostats and a 130 GPM water pump. This improved the flow through the block by 70-75% and flow to the radiator 7%.

Applications[edit]

Specifications[edit]

Fuel system[edit]

Common Problems[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]