Destiny (video game)

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Destiny
Bungie - Destiny (logo).jpg
Promotional image
Developer(s)Bungie
Publisher(s)Activision
Composer(s)Martin O'Donnell
Michael Salvatori
Paul McCartney[1]
Platform(s)PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
Genre(s)First-person shooter, action role-playing, open world
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer
Media/distributionOptical disc, download
 
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Destiny
Bungie - Destiny (logo).jpg
Promotional image
Developer(s)Bungie
Publisher(s)Activision
Composer(s)Martin O'Donnell
Michael Salvatori
Paul McCartney[1]
Platform(s)PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
Genre(s)First-person shooter, action role-playing, open world
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer
Media/distributionOptical disc, download

Destiny is an upcoming first-person shooter video game being developed by Bungie. As part of a ten-year publishing deal with Activision,[2] Destiny will be published by Activision on the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 video game consoles. A contract detailing Bungie and Activision's publishing agreement originally listed the game for release in Q3/Q4 2013.[3] In February 2013, however, Activision stated it has not included the launch in its 2013 outlook, and that "there should be no speculation or expectation of a different result."[4]

Contents

Gameplay

Bungie has emphasized that the world of Destiny will be "alive". Events may happen in-game that are not necessarily controlled or planned by the developer, which will help to create a dynamic developing experience for Bungie and a dynamic playing experience for gamers. The game's style has been described as an always-online first-person shooter that will incorporate massively multiplayer online game (MMO) elements, but Bungie has avoided defining Destiny as being in-kind with traditional MMO games. Destiny will incorporate a new game engine that allows global illuminations and real-time dynamic lighting to occur together. An innovation in Bungie's "hopper" technology, which has been the backbone for Halo's matchmaking system, will allow better player matchmaking in order to create a more natural experience in either cooperative or competitive multiplayer modes.[5]

Sypnosis

Destiny is set seven hundred years into the future in a post-apocalyptic setting. In a universe where humans had spread and colonised other solar systems in the Milky Way, an event known as "The Collapse" saw the mysterious dissolution of these colonies and the dissapearance of nearly all mankind. The only known survivors of The Collapse are those living on Earth, saved by a white, spherical celestial body, bearing a striking resemblance physically and in size to Enceladus, known simply as "The Traveller". It hovers above the 'last city' built by the survivors underneath The Traveller itself.

The player takes on the role of a Guardian of the last city. Upon mankind's first attempt to repopulate and reconstruct after The Collapse, it is discovered that a number of different alien races, not necessarily allied with each other like The Covenant from Halo, have occupied mankind's former colonies and civilisations. The player's main goal is to investigate and destroy these threats before humanity is completely wiped out by them.

Development

The first references to the Destiny were shown in Bungie's 20th anniversary documentary, O Brave New World, when it was known by its original working title Tiger.[6] Bungie co-founder Jason Jones noted that the name Tiger was chosen because the studio found that it was engaging audiences in a way that the developers had never experimented with previously, but the working title was later changed to Destiny.[7]

On May 21, 2012, a publishing contract between Bungie and Activision was presented as part of the Activision's lawsuit against former Infinity Ward employees, Jason West and Vincent Zampella.[3][8]

The first public details of Destiny were leaked in November 2012, revealing concept art and plot details.[9] Bungie supplemented the leak with the release of further concept art, whilst expressing regret that details of an upcoming video game had once again been revealed before their planned release.[10] In describing Destiny, Bungie's lead writer Joseph Staten stated that the studio was approaching the game with the intention of "building a universe" that would "take on a life of its own".[11]

On February 11, 2013, Bungie began on its website a viral marketing campaign with alternate reality game elements to promote the official announcement of Destiny.[12] On February 15, 2013, a double-sided promotional poster of the game, along with new info provided by documentation that came with the posters, was sent to Joystiq by a "GameStop source".[13]

On February 17, 2013, Bungie released a video documentary revealing information on Destiny and some of the core ideas behind the game.[14][15] The official website also lists the game as available for pre-order from Amazon, GameStop, and Best Buy retailers.[16]

References

  1. ^ Sinclair, Brendan (July 7, 2012). "Paul McCartney working with Bungie". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. http://www.gamespot.com/news/paul-mccartney-working-with-bungie-6386022. Retrieved July 7, 2012.
  2. ^ Terdiman, Daniel (April 29, 2010). "Activision scores big win with Bungie deal". CNET. CBS Interactive. http://news.cnet.com/8301-13772_3-20003777-52.html. Retrieved August 7, 2011.
  3. ^ a b Pham, Alex (May 21, 2012). "Bungie-Activision contract". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Company. http://documents.latimes.com/bungie-activision-contract/. Retrieved February 18, 2013.
  4. ^ Activision Blizzard Inc.. "Press Release: The Creators of Halo® and the Publisher of Call of Duty® Unveil DestinyTM". Activision Blizzard Inc.. http://investor.activision.com/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=740914. Retrieved 20 February 2013.
  5. ^ Bugie's Destiny: A Land of Hope and Dreams IGN.COM, Ryan McCaffrey, February 17, 2013
  6. ^ "O Brave New World". Bungie YouTube. YouTube. August 4, 2011. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OtG6--4r_qk. Retrieved August 8, 2011.
  7. ^ Dutton, Fred (August 4, 2011). "Bungie doc teases Project Tiger". Eurogamer. Eurogamer Network. http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2011-08-04-bungie-doc-teases-project-tiger. Retrieved August 8, 2011.
  8. ^ Pham, Alex; Fritz, Ben (May 21, 2012). "Activision Bungie contract unsealed in Call of Duty case". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Company. http://articles.latimes.com/print/2012/may/21/entertainment/la-et-ct-bungie-activision-contract-20120521. Retrieved February 18, 2013.
  9. ^ Goldfarb, Andrew (November 27, 2012). "Bungie's Destiny Story Details, Concept Art Leaked". IGN. News Corporation. http://uk.ign.com/articles/2012/11/28/destiny-story-details-concept-art-leaked. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  10. ^ Dague, David (November 27, 2012). "Well, that just happened ... again.". Bungie. http://www.bungie.net/News/content.aspx?type=topnews&cid=32235. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  11. ^ Reilly, Jim (August 4, 2011). "New Hints for Bungie's Next Game". IGN. News Corporation. http://au.xbox360.ign.com/articles/118/1186218p1.html. Retrieved August 8, 2011.
  12. ^ Dyer, Mitch (February 11, 2013). "Bungie's Destiny ARG Hints at Monday Reveal". IGN. News Corporation. http://www.ign.com/articles/2013/02/12/bungies-destiny-arg-hints-at-monday-reveal. Retrieved February 12, 2013.
  13. ^ Sliwinski, Alexander (February 15, 2013). "Bungie's Destiny pre-order posters arrive at GameStop". Joystiq. AOL. http://www.joystiq.com/2013/02/15/bungies-destiny-pre-order-posters-arrive-at-gamestop/. Retrieved February 18, 2013.
  14. ^ "Destiny reveal tweet". DestinyTheGame Twitter. Twitter. February 12, 2013. https://twitter.com/DestinyTheGame/status/301405437679513601. Retrieved February 12, 2013.
  15. ^ "Destiny ViDoc – Pathways Out of Darkness". Bungie. 17 February 2013. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwOUi4JDC4o. Retrieved 17 February 2013.
  16. ^ "Destiny the Game Pre-order". Bungie. http://www.destinythegame.com/wheretobuy. Retrieved 18 February 2013.

External links