Destination Imagination

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Destination Imagination, Inc.
Destination Imagination Logo.png
MottoWhere can your imagination take you?
FocusTeaching the creative process from imagination to innovation to students from kindergarten through university level
Location
Area servedUS, Canada, and 30 other countries
ProductsEducational Programs that teach 21st century skills
MethodChallenge-based learning
Members1.5 million Alumni
Owner501(c)(3)
Key peopleDr. Charles Cadle, CEO
Revenue$10 million
Employees30[citation needed]
Volunteers38,000 [1]
MissionTo inspire and equip students to become the next generation of innovators and leaders
Websitewww.destinationimagination.org
Formerly calledOM Association, Inc.
Similar to program offered by First Robotics and other STEM related academic competitions[citation needed]
 
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This article is about the non-profit organization. For the television special, see Destination: Imagination.


Destination Imagination (DI) is a volunteer-led, educational non-profit that teaches 21st century skills and STEM principles to kindergarten through university level students through creative and collaborative problem solving Challenges. Team members work together to develop a solution to one of 7 open-ended Challenges and present their solutions at tournaments. Through the Challenge program, students learn and experience the creative process from imagination to innovation and learn skills needed to succeed in school, career and life, including teamwork, communication, project management, perseverance, creative and critical thinking, and self-confidence.

In 2011, researchers from the University of Virginia Curry School of Education conducted an independent research evaluation of the DI program. The evaluation focused on the program’s effectiveness, impact and participant satisfaction in areas relating to creative problem-solving, creative and critical thinking, teamwork and leadership. Among other findings, the researchers reported, “Students who participated in the activities and tournaments provided by DI outperformed comparable students who had not participated in DI on assessments measuring creative thinking, critical thinking and collaborative problem solving.”


Destination Imagination, Inc.
Destination Imagination Logo.png
MottoWhere can your imagination take you?
FocusTeaching the creative process from imagination to innovation to students from kindergarten through university level
Location
Area servedUS, Canada, and 30 other countries
ProductsEducational Programs that teach 21st century skills
MethodChallenge-based learning
Members1.5 million Alumni
Owner501(c)(3)
Key peopleDr. Charles Cadle, CEO
Revenue$10 million
Employees30[citation needed]
Volunteers38,000 [1]
MissionTo inspire and equip students to become the next generation of innovators and leaders
Websitewww.destinationimagination.org
Formerly calledOM Association, Inc.
Similar to program offered by First Robotics and other STEM related academic competitions[citation needed]

Contents

Challenge Program[edit]

Team Challenges are designed by industry experts, educators and volunteers. The standards-based challenges have both long and short-term components. In August of each year, Destination Imagination releases seven new challenges, pertaining to different subject matter areas that a team must solve. Teams then have until the date of their first tournament to work on the challenges. All challenges include a presentation portion, rehearsed or on the spot. The types of team challenges include technical, scientific, fine arts, improvisational, structural, service learning, and early learning challenges. Each of the seven challenges in the DI program is designed to enable students to develop 21st Century skills, including teamwork, perseverance, self-directed learning, courage and leadership. While working as a team to devise a solution, the students also learn to value each person’s abilities and unique strengths.

Types of Team Challenges[edit]

Each year, Destination Imagination releases seven challenges geared to specific learning objectives. These challenges are then solved by teams.

Technical[edit]

The Technical Challenge requires teams to build equipment, such as vehicles, in order to solve their challenge. They must also include a performance, in a specific form or about a general topic supplied with the challenge. In addition, the challenge requires teams to create specific elements unique to the team that will count as Team Choice Elements. The team will be evaluated on their creativity and originality, the quality, workmanship and effort, and the integration of the elements into the presentation. Normally, Team Choice Elements account for 15% of a team's score. The Team Choice Element can be anything that the team chooses, as long as it is not a scoring element.

Scientific[edit]

The Scientific Challenge requires teams to do research on a specific aspect of science, and then create a performance based on it. Sometimes, there is also a specific requirement to build a certain kind of prop or costume. In addition, the challenge requires teams to create two specific elements unique to the team that will count as Team Choice Elements. The team will be evaluated on the creativity and originality, the quality, workmanship and effort, and the integration of the element into the presentation. Normally, Team Choice Elements account for 15% of a team's score. The Team Choice Element can be anything that the team chooses, as long as it is not a scoring element.

Fine Arts[edit]

The Fine Arts Challenge requires teams to create and act out a performance that demonstrates some theatrical technique. It may be to use a certain method of presentation or to make a certain type of prop. In addition, the challenge requires teams to create two specific elements unique to the team that will count as Team Choice Elements. The team will be evaluated on the creativity and originality, the quality, workmanship and effort, and the integration of the element into the presentation. Normally, Team Choice Elements account for 15% of a team's score. The Team Choice Element can be anything that the team chooses, as long as it is not a scoring element.

Improvisational[edit]

The Improvisational Challenge requires teams to think on their feet and create a skit within a short window of time, and then present it. There is usually a theme, of some sort, as well as a prop requirement that requires teams to create or incorporate different props. The team will also be evaluated for teamwork in this challenge.

Structural[edit]

The Structural Challenge requires teams to create a structure, with material and weight requirements, as well as an accompanying performance that has to do with some aspect of the structure. The structures are scored using a weight held ratio (WHR), where the weight held at the tournament is divided over the weight of the structure, to create a fair comparison of team structures. Some years, there have been additional elements that the team had to incorporate into their structures, such as holding golf balls. By performing these extra tasks, the team may receive additional weight held credit. In addition, the challenge requires teams to create two specific elements unique to the team that will count as Team Choice Elements. The team will be evaluated on the creativity and originality, the quality, workmanship and effort, and the integration of the element into the presentation. Normally, Team Choice Elements account for 15% of a team's score. The Team Choice Element can be anything that the team chooses, as long as it is not a scoring element.

Service Learning[edit]

The Service Learning Challenge, also known as projectOUTREACH®, requires teams to do a service project that benefits their community, and then create a performance to present at the tournament. The challenge always has a theme that the team has to incorporate into their skit, or the way they carry out their project. For some program seasons, the challenge requires teams to create two specific elements unique to the team that will count as Team Choice Elements. The team will be evaluated on the creativity and originality, the quality, workmanship and effort, and the integration of the element into the presentation. Normally, Team Choice Elements account for 15% of a team's score. The Team Choice Element can be anything that the team chooses, as long as it is not a scoring element.

Early Learning[edit]

For kids 4-to-7 years of age, Destination Imagination offers the Rising Stars! for Early Learners Challenge. The challenge encourages kids to be creative and is noncompetitive, which allows kids to play and experiment with their solutions without pressure. The children can also partake in the showcase option, which allows them to present their solutions at a tournament.

Team Challenge History[edit]

SeasonA
Technical
B
Scientific
C
Fine Arts
D
Improvisational
E
Structural
Rising Stars!®pO
projectOUTREACH®
2014-2015Creature FeatureMaking WavesFeary TalesThe Improv GamesLose to WinAnimal Mish MashBrand Aid
2013-2014 [2]Dig InGoing to ExtremesLaugh Art LoudPandemonium!The Tension BuildsCircus!Pitch and Play
2012-2013In the ZoneWindvisibleIn DisguiseChange in RealiTEEtwist-o-ramaROY G BIVReal to Reel
2011-2012Assembly RequiredThe Solar StageComing AttractionsNews To MeHold It!Built to LastThe World Canvas
2010-2011[3]Unidentified Moving ObjectSpinning a TaleTriple Take Road ShowMythology MissionVerses! Foiled Again!Big Bug's Bad DayDynamic Networks
2009-2010[4]DIrect DIpositDI-BotYou’re Gonna Flip!Do or DIBreaking DI NewsWeighty NewsBand Together
2008-2009[5]Operation CooperationInstinct MessagingViDIo Lit HitsPrivate DIA New Angle!Hidden!Take Charge
2007-2008[6]Obstacles, Of Course!Hit or MythDI've Got a Secret!Chorific!SWITCH!TwisDId History
2006-2007[7]DIrect FlightCSI-DIRound About CourageSwitching TraDItionsCard-DI-ologyMake It New, It's Up To You
2005-2006[8]Back At You!Kidz Rulz!How’d tHAT Happen?On SafariThe Inside DImension1-2-Change-A-ROO
2004-2005[9]DIzzy DerbySudden SerenDIpityLive! It's RaDIo DI!IMPROVing AlongDIsigning BridgesMore to the Story!
2003-2004[10]Destinations in TimeThe Plot and the PendulumCartoon DImensionsUpbeat ImprovGuessDImate!Surprise Trip!
2002-2003[11]Change in DIrectionViDIo AdventureTheatre SmartsOnce Improv A TimeConnecDIdLost and Found
2001-2002[12]It's Your MoveStranDIdOn HolidayThe Art of ImprovDual DI-lemma
2000-2001[13]IncreDIble TechEffectsMystery Loves CompanyAnonymously YoursDInamic ImprovTriplicity
1999-2000[14]Fruit Roller Coaster & EggplorationIf Music Be the Food of Life... Play on!Mixing Apples and OrangesInstant Pudding ImprovIt's Not Impastable!

1999-2000 Program Year[edit]

In Destination Imagination's first season, they offered one extra challenge that was not offered in later years.[15]

Fruit Roller Coaster[edit]

Teams had to create a roller coaster that would move a tennis ball through it as fast as possible. A thrill element was required, where teams would have to create a special piece of track, such as a loop, or a jump to satisfy challenge requirements. A performance that included improvisational, and artistic elements was also a requirement of the challenge. The time limit was 10 minutes and the cost limit was US$100.[15]

Mixing Apples and Oranges[edit]

The challenge required teams to tell a story about an adoption between two different species. Additionally, teams had to show a demonstration of the challenges of being a parent, and utilize a recording of the adopted child or a photo album. The story must end with the return of the creature to its original species. There was a time limit of 8 minutes and a cost limit of US$100.[15]

If Music Be the Food of Life, Play On[edit]

The team had to create a musical story that had no written or spoken language. The team's performance should have visually represented all five human senses. A team created musical instrument was to be integrated into the presentation. A prop or piece of scenery had to physically change its appearance during the course of the performance. There was a time limit of 6 minutes and a cost limit of US$100.[15]

Instant Pudding Improv[edit]

A list of twelve famous people and twelve famous places was provided for teams to research. One of which from each category would randomly be selected as a required element of the performance. The team has to provide ten items, one of which would be randomly selected as a required element of the performance. The team would have had 30 minutes to create and practice their story, and them up to 6 minutes to present it.[15]

It's Not Impastable[edit]

Teams had to create a structure, made only out of pasta and glue, to hold as much weight as possible. The weight to the structure would have to be applied off-center. A story requiring artistic, performance and improvisational elements was also part of the challenge. The presentation time limit was 8 minutes and the cost limit was US$100.[15]

Eggsploration[edit]

The team had to build a device to transport eggs through an obstacle course, without breaking them. Two additional obstacles had to be built by the team. In addition, a device to break the eggs at the end of the course was required. A performance with an overall theme of all the equipment was also required. The time limit was 10 minutes and the cost limit was US$100.[15]

2000-2001 Program Year[edit]

IncreDIble Tech Effects[edit]

The team had to research and create four special effects. The special effects had to be incorporated into a story.[16]

Mystery Loves Company[edit]

The team had to write and present a mystery story that used a unique communication method, and incorporated a scientific experiment.[16]

Anonymously Your[edit]

Teams had to find and select a work of art produced by an unknown person. They had to create a story using characteristics from the era that the work of art was produced, and tell the story of the artist. A technological element using technology from the era was required.[16]

DInamic Improv[edit]

Teams had one hour in the "StuDIo" (practice area) to plan and practice their story. In addition, the researching of famous innovators, cultural performers and important landmarks was required. Some of each would randomly be required in the presentation.[16]

Triplicity[edit]

Teams had to create a three part structure made from balsa wood, paper, and glue, which would be tested at the tournament. The team must also create a story about a journey.[16]

2001-2002 Program Year[edit]

It's Your Move[edit]

The theme of this challenge was a game board. Teams had to construct a vehicle to serve as the "game piece". An Object Delivery Device also had to be produced by teams, in order to deliver objects to a team built receiver. All the equipment and a performance had to have a theme. Three elements of the team's choice were scored as "side trips". An improvisational element was also required in the team's performance.[17]

StranDId[edit]

A story about being stranded was required. Teams had to build a StranDId DIvice that combined simple machines into a complex machine, that would have to perform a task while the team was stranded. Teams had to use 2 commonplace items in a unique way during the performance. Three elements of the team's choice were scored as "side trips". An improvisational element was also required in the team's performance.[17]

On Holiday[edit]

Teams had to write and present a performance about traveling to a nation, other than their own, for a holiday. In the performance, two different interpretations of the nation's unique National or a Cultural Landmark, Event, Custom, Holiday, Plant, Animal, Food, Costume, Language, or Geographic Feature had to be integrated. Furthermore, at least one costume and one set was required, in addition to a prop or piece of scenery that goes under a change to help interpret the unique National or a Cultural Landmark, Event, Custom, Holiday, Plant, Animal, Food, Costume, Language, or Geographic Feature that is unique to that Nation. Three elements of the team's choice were scored as "side trips", and an improvisational element was also required in the team's performance.[17]

Art of Improv[edit]

Teams had to create a story to perform at a tournament in the 30 minutes of StuDIo time provided. Four required elements were required in the performance, including team created artwork based off a famous work of art, a situation, an improv technique, information gathered from a famous exploration. In the StuDIo time, teams had to choose one specialty item to be scored as a "side trip". Then, one minute before the presentation, the team would have to draw out of a hat a surprise character to be used in their performance.[17]

Dual DIlemma[edit]

Teams had to build two structures to be tested at the tournament. One had to be built prior out of balsa wood, paper and glue. One had to be built during the presentation time at the tournament using balsa wood and tape. Teams had to write and present a contrasting story with two different parts. A costume and prop that showed contrast also had to be built. Three elements of the team's choice were scored as "side trips" and an improvisational element was also required in the team's performance.[17]

2002-2003 Season[edit]

In the 2002-2003 Season, Destination Imagination started offering the early learning Rising Stars Challenge.[18]

A Change in DIrection[edit]

Teams had to design and build 2 different technical devices that can be built from the same set of parts. The team would have to take apart and reassemble the set of parts to transition from one device to the other. The team had to build a transport system to move the parts from one assembly area to the next. There was a performance element that required a story pertaining to the devices and tasks. Three elements of the team's choice were scored as "side trips", and an improvisational element were required in the performance.[18]

ViDIo Adventure[edit]

Teams had to create a three-dimensional adventure video game themed performance that told the story of a modern day quest. Teams had to design an build a "seeker", which would travel through 3 nations represented as levels in the video game. At some point in each level, the team had to collect a reward that would help them solve their quests. Three elements of the team's choice were scored as "side trips", and an improvisational element were required in the performance.[18]

Theater SmARTs[edit]

Teams had to create a performance with a DIsruption in it, and then figure out how to recover from it. Three examples of theater art was required in this performance. Scenery that moves or gives the illusion of motion was also required. Three elements of the team's choice were scored as "side trips", and an improvisational element were required in the performance.[18]

Once Improv a Time[edit]

Teams had to read 10 classic tales and pick out literary elements from each. At the tournament, teams would be given 30 minutes of StuDIo Time to plan and practice their 6 minute long performance. Teams had to incorporate a randomly chosen Surprise Setting with some of the literary elements the researched. During the StuDIo Time, teams had to build a Unique Functional Object out of tape and newspaper to use in their performance. Right before performance time, teams had to phrase made from three randomly selected letters of the alphabet.[18]

ConnecDId[edit]

Teams had to make a structure entirely out of wood to be tested at the tournament. In addition to the structure, teams had to write and present an 8 minute long skit about connections. Teams also had to create a Universal Connection Creation to use in their performance in multiple ways. Three elements of the team's choice were scored as "side trips", and an improvisational element were required in the performance.[18]

Lost and Found[edit]

This challenge was a Rising Stars® challenge created for children in kindergarten through second grade. Teams had to create a story about losing something, and then finding it. Several characters were required to make a plan. The teams had to create a map to use in their performance to help find the lost object. One element of the team's choice was scored as a "side trip".[18]

2003-2004 Season[edit]

DestiNations in Time[edit]

Teams had to build a unique timing device to use in their performance. During the performance, teams had to perform tasks on time. An international story about the effects of you being able to change time was required.[19]

The Plot and the Pendulum[edit]

Teams had to create and present a story about one story that splits into 2, that both have separate endings and the same beginnings. A Plot Diverter Pendulum also was required to be made by the team. The Diverter had to signal the separation of the stories.[19]

Cartoon DImensions[edit]

Teams had to create a "cartoon story" that comes to life in 3D. Sounds and visual effects had to be integrated into the presentation.[19]

Upbeat Improv[edit]

Teams would have 30 minutes to plan and practice their performance in the StuDIo. A team created instrument had to be incorporated into the presentation. The performance had to incorporate music.[19]

GuessDImate[edit]

Teams had to build a structure out of wood and glue, and then guess how much weight it could hold, before adding weight. Bonus points would be awarded if the estimate was within a certain range.[19]

Surprise Trip[edit]

This challenge was a Rising Stars® challenge created for children in kindergarten through second grade. Teams had to create a story about a previously planned adventure. A detour would have to alter the adventure, and change the ending.[19]

2004-2005 Season[edit]

DIzzy Derby[edit]

Teams had to build a vehicle with a technical energy source that would race around a triangular race track while carrying a team member. Team built detours-some team designed, some designed by the challenge-would be placed around the track. Teams could choose to attempt them for extra points. Harder detours would receive more points. Points would be awarded for laps completed, and detours completed. A skit about all the elements of this challenge had to be created. 3 team chosen elements would be scored as side-trips.[20]

Live! It's RaDIo DI[edit]

Teams had to create and present a story as a live radio broadcast. Live sound effects had to be incorporated into the live broadcast. The team must have created a "cliffhanger", before a "commercial break". The team-created commercial must have included a jingle and outrageous claim. A randomly selected improvisation element would have had to be incorporated as a news bulletin. Three team-chosen elements would be scored as side-trips.[20]

Sudden SerenDIpity[edit]

Teams must create a story about discovering or inventing something by accident. Two inventions had to be presented. One initial, and one serendipitously invented by result of the initial invention. A technical device had to perform tasks in several steps throughout the performance. The impact of the invention created as a result had to be interpreted from more than one view. 3 team chosen elements would be scored as side-trips.[20]

Improving Along[edit]

Teams had to research 12 types of transportation prior to the tournament, one of, chosen by the tournament, would have to be incorporated into the performance. A six minute skit had to be created during a 30 minute StuDIo time. Teams would randomly select an event, provided by the tournament, to be incorporated into the skit. One of four travel games would have to have been incorporated into the skit. An invisible prop had to be incorporated.[20]

DIsigning Bridges[edit]

Teams had to build a bridge out of wood, monofilament fishing wire and glue, to be tested at the tournament. Points would be awarded for the bridges based on its length multiplied by its weight held. Teams had to predict what would happen when weights were stacked on a bridge. The bridge design had to incorporate a design element of a bridge from another country. The challenge required teams to connect to the country that the bridge had a design element from in the presentation. 3 team chosen elements would be scored as side-trips.[20]

More to the Story[edit]

This challenge was a Rising Stars® challenge created for children in kindergarten through second grade. Teams had to choose a well known fairy tale or fable. The team would have to write and present a performance about what happens after that story ends.[20]

2005-2006 Season[edit]

Back at You[edit]

The challenge called for teams to create a delivery device to move tennis and ping pong balls from one zone to the next, and a device to return them to the initial zone. The process of going away, and coming back had to be incorporated into a team created performance. 2 team chosen elements would be scored as side-trips.[21]

Kidz Rulz[edit]

The challenge called for teams to bend a rule of motion in a team created performance. A team created demonstration of this broken rule had to be incorporated into the performance. A theatrical set was required as a part of the challenge. 2 team chosen elements would be scored as side-trips.[21]

How'd tHAT Happen?[edit]

A story about unusual events in a country other than the team's own was required in the presentation. The team had to choose to present the performance in 1 of 8 ways, named in the challenge. A hat that changes the wearer of the hat in a dramatic way had to be in the performance. A technical method had to cause a "bizarre happening". 2 team chosen elements would be scored as side-trips.[21]

On Safari[edit]

Teams would have 30 minutes of StuDIo time at a tournament to create a 6 minute skit about a safari. Teams had to research 6 different environments, and 6 different living inhabitants. One of which would randomly selected, and be required to be incorporated into the performance. An original innovative device, improv technique, randomly selected DIsaster, a goal, and a symbol all had to be incorporated into the skit.[21]

Inside DImension[edit]

2 structures had to be created. One had to fit inside the other. The structures would be tested for weight held simultaneously. Teams had to research an architect. A character representing a creation made by the architect. This character would have to tell the story of the architect from its perspective. The story had to include a "Life and Times Element" chosen from a challenge-provided list. 2 team chosen elements would be scored as side-trips.[21]

1-2-Change-A-Roo[edit]

This challenge was a Rising Stars® challenge created for children in kindergarten through second grade. Teams had to create a play that had a number in it. In addition, Teams had to create a prop out of newspaper and tape and a prop that a team member can fit through.[21]

2006-2007 Season[edit]

DIrect Flight[edit]

Teams will construct aircraft prior to the tournament, to land in zones. One will have to be built at the tournament from only a sheet of paper. At the tournament, the team would draw cards on where the aircraft had to land. Up to 3 elevators had to be produced to launch the airplanes. The team had to tie all the elements of the challenge together in a performance. 2 team chosen elements would be scored as side-trips.[22]

CSI:DI[edit]

Teams had to write and perform a skit where a case is investigated, and resolved with evidence. A colorful character, and a shadowy character were required in the performance. A theatrical effect that included Color, Shadow and/or illumination was required in the skit. A gadget that analyzed a piece of evidence using visual light was required. 2 team chosen elements would be scored as side-trips.[22]

Round About Courage[edit]

Teams had to create a story about a heroic adventure, and present it as theater in the round. A technical set piece or prop had to be integrated into the performance. No electricity could be used in the performance. 2 team chosen elements would be scored as side-trips.[22]

Switching TraDItions[edit]

Teams would be given 30 minutes of planning time to make a 6 minute skit to present. Research of 6 different nations and their traditions was required, as 3 of the nations/traditions would be required in the teams performance. The performance required 3 scenes. Each scene would have to include one of the 3 traditions. A randomly selected situation and sensory card would be chosen to be integrated into the performance. One improvisational technique had to be incorporated into the performance. A traDItioner had to be created from materials brought to the tournament, and incorporated into the skit.[22]

CarDIology[edit]

A structure made only out of playing cards and glue was required. This would be tested at the tournament. An architectural drawing of the structure had to be brought to the tournament. A story about the impact of cards on a character was required to be presented. 2 team chosen elements would be scored as side-trips.[22]

Make it New! It's up to you[edit]

This challenge was a Rising Stars® challenge created for children in kindergarten through second grade. Teams had to make a play in which a landmark changes. A prop that makes a noise to change the landmark had to be incorporated into the skit. One character had to wear a hat made out of newspaper.[22]

2007-2008 Season[edit]

Obstacles, Of Course[edit]

Teams had to create a vehicle to overcome team created obstacles. A non-verbal presentation about overcoming obstacles also had to be created. 2 elements of the teams choosing would be scored as side trips.[23]

Hit or Myth[edit]

Teams had to create a story involving a myth, urban legend, or folk tale that takes place in another country. An investigation into the myth, urban legend, or folk tale had to be included and presented in the team's presentation. 2 elements of the teams choosing would be scored as side trips.[23]

DI've Got a Secret[edit]

Teams had to write and present a story about a secret. An optical illusion and three set pieces had to be incorporated into the presentation. 2 elements of the teams choosing would be scored as side trips.[23]

Chorific[edit]

Teams had 30 minutes to create a 6 minute presentation about a chore at a tournament. Two random obstacles related to the chore had to be incorporated into the presentation. An improvisational technique had to be incorporated into the presentation. A previously researched, randomly selected famous person also had to be incorporated into the presentation.[23]

SWITCH![edit]

A structure made out of wood and glue had to be made. The structure then had to be tested in two different orientations. An item that can serve more than one item (a SWITCH item) had to be incorporated. 2 elements of the teams choosing would be scored as side trips.[23]

TwisDId History[edit]

This challenge was a Rising Stars® challenge created for children in kindergarten through second grade. Teams had to take an event from history and alter what really happened. A song had to be incorporated into the performance. Four different shapes had to be used to make a prop.[23]

2008-2009 Season[edit]

In the 2008-2009 Season, Destination Imagination started offering the service-learning projectOUTREACH challenge.[24]

Operation Cooperation[edit]

2 machines had to be created by the team. The two machines had to perform tasks together. No AC Power could be used in the presentation. A story about cooperation in another country had to be presented. 2 team-chosen elements would be scored as side trips.[24]

Instinct Messaging[edit]

A story about communication between creatures was required. One "Featured Creature" had to be studied by the team. A team created costume had to help communicate a message from the featured creature. A 3-D set piece had to depict the habitat of the featured creature. 2 team-chosen elements would be scored as side trips.[24]

ViDIo Lit Hits[edit]

Teams had to create a live music video, with team created lyrics and choreography, that retells a piece of literature. Using technical methods, teams had to enter or exit in a grand way. A character from the selected piece of literature had to be portrayed dramatically. 2 team-chosen elements would be scored as side trips.[24]

Private DI[edit]

During a 30 minute period, teams had to create a 6 minute skit about a randomly selected superstition. The skit had to be presented using 3 different randomly selected film genres. An origin for the sleuth had to be presented. Teams had to make a physical device to detect the origin of the superstition. A surprise that was randomly selected had to be incorporated into the story.[24]

A New Angle![edit]

A two-part structure completely made out of wood and glue had to be made by the team. A story about combining 2 forms of art had to be presented alongside the structure. 2 team-chosen elements would be scored as side trips.[24]

Hidden![edit]

This challenge was a Rising Stars® challenge created for children in kindergarten through second grade. A play in which the characters solve a problem had to be presented.[24]

Take Charge[edit]

This challenge was a projectOUTREACH challenge, which requires teams to perform a service project that benefits the community. Teams had to present their project at a tournament.[24]

2009-2010 Season[edit]

DIrect DIposit[edit]

Equipment had to be created by the team in order to move objects on to targets on the other side of a barrier. Different numbers of high and low risk target could be chosen by teams. A high risk target meant that the team had to deliver less objects, but each object was worth more. A story about making a decision had to be presented. Teams had to include 2 elements from their presentation of their choosing for side trip scoring.[25]

DI-Bot[edit]

Teams had to write a story that includes how a character's life was changed by robots. A team created device called a DI-BOT had to perform an action in the story. At least one prop item had to change into or a part of DI-BOT. Teams had to include 2 elements from their presentation of their choosing for side trip scoring.[25]

You're Gonna Flip![edit]

Teams had to write and present a story about a character whose views change on something. A puppet and piece of live visual art had to be incorporated into the presentation. Teams had to include 2 elements from their presentation of their choosing for side trip scoring.[25]

Do or DI[edit]

A five minute skit about something that is in danger of extinction had to be created within a seven minute period at a tournament. A randomly selected unimpressive superpower, surprise, and stock character had to be incorporated into the skit.[25]

Breaking DI News[edit]

A structure made out of newspaper and glue had to be made by the team for testing at a tournament. All the props and scenery, including one made only out of newsprint, used in the performance had to fit within a 30 inch by 24 inch by 48 inch container. A story that includes a newsworthy event from a country other than the team's home country had to be included. Teams had to include 2 elements from their presentation of their choosing for side trip scoring.[25]

Weighty News[edit]

This challenge was a Rising Stars® challenge created for children in kindergarten through second grade.[25]

Band Together[edit]

This challenge was a projectOUTREACH challenge, which requires teams to perform a service project that benefits the community. The project that the teams did had to incorporate music. Teams had to present a performance at a tournament regarding their project that stimulates multiple senses. Teams had to include 2 elements from their presentation of their choosing for side trip scoring.[25]

2010-2011 Season[edit]

Unidentified Moving Object[edit]

Teams had to build equipment to move objects up to the top of a tower, and down into a small pool. During regional and affiliate competitions, the pool was empty, but at Global Finals, water was present in the pool. All the equipment used for moving objects had to start and finish the presentation inside a 20 inch by 20 inch by 20 inch box. A sales presentation that attempts to sell the team's equipment had to be presented alongside the equipment. No AC Power could be used for any portion of this challenge. Teams had to include 2 elements from their presentation of their choosing for side trip scoring.[26]

Spinning a Tale[edit]

Teams had to create a 3 act story that could start from any act. A DICycler had to change with the story, as well as have a finale that signals the end of a presentation. Teams had to include 2 elements from their presentation of their choosing for side trip scoring.[26]

Triple Take Road Show[edit]

Teams had to write a story that could be presented 3 times to 3 imaginary audiences, using different storytelling methods. A travel method had to be incorporated to bridge the gap between the 3 separate tellings of the story. A technical spectacle had to be incorporated. Teams had to include 2 elements from their presentation of their choosing for side trip scoring.[26]

Mythology Mission[edit]

A 5 minute presentation about a mythological creature had to be created during a 7 minute preparation time at a tournament. Culture from a different country, 3 randomly selected souvenirs, and an unexpected problem had to be incorporated into the story.[26]

Verses! Foiled Again![edit]

A structure had to be created by the team out of aluminum foil, wood and or glue, that would be tested for how much weight it can hold at a tournament. A story about how a character was "foiled" had to be presented in the performance aspect of this challenge. A verse published by someone not on the team, and a team created verse had to be incorporated into the performance. Teams had to include 2 elements from their presentation of their choosing for side trip scoring.[26]

Big Bug's Bad Day[edit]

This challenge was a Rising Stars® challenge created for children in kindergarten through second grade. Teams had to learn about bugs, and then write a story in which Big Bug has a bad day, and how its friends try to make it better.[26]

Dynamic Networks[edit]

This challenge was a projectOUTREACH challenge, which requires teams to perform a service project that benefits the community. Social media had to be used as a part of the project. At the tournament teams had to present something based on their project.[26]

2011-2012 Season[edit]

In the 2011-2012 Season Destination Imagination renamed side trips to Team Choice Elements.

Assembly Required[edit]

Teams had to design objects to be assembled at the tournament. A vehicle had to be used by the team to move the parts of the objects into an assembly area, and then into the delivery area. A story about something happening just in time had to be presented as well. Two items of the teams choosing would be scored additionally as Team Choice Elements.[27]

Solar Stage[edit]

Teams had to incorporate solar energy, and a solar energy prototype into a story that they write. Teams had to provide their own lighting. Two items of the teams choosing would be scored additionally as Team Choice Elements.[27]

Coming Attractions[edit]

Teams had to write and present a movie trailer involving at least 2 nations. A theatrical special effect and a sound track had to be included in the performance. Two items of the teams choosing would be scored additionally as Team Choice Elements.[27]

News to Me[edit]

Teams had to create a 5 minute skit during a 7 minute practice time that used a cause and effect relationship to connect 2 news stories. One news story was randomly selected by the tournament, the other randomly selected out of the stories the teams provided in advance. The entire story would have to be affected by the One Minute Glitch (OMG), which was given with one minute remaining in the planning time. Human props and scenery had to be incorporated.[27]

Hold It![edit]

A structure made only out of wood and glue had to be provided by the team to be tested at a tournament. The structure also had to function as a golf ball holder. A golf ball delivery device also had to be made by the team. A story about a captivator had to be presented alongside the structure. Two items of the teams choosing would be scored additionally as Team Choice Elements.[27]

Built to Last[edit]

This challenge was a Rising Stars® challenge created for children in kindergarten through second grade. Teams had to research toys, and use their findings in a skit about the last toy that will ever be produced.[27]

The World Canvas[edit]

This challenge was a projectOUTREACH challenge, which requires teams to perform a service project that benefits the community. An advertisement had to be used in the project, and a brochure had to be created after the project to showcase it.[27]

2012-2013 Season[edit]

In the Zone[edit]

Teams had to build between 3 and 10 small vehicles that could accurately travel to a location on the tournament floor. At least 3 separate power sources had to be used to power the vehicles. A story about the dangers faced by vehicles had to be presented. Two items of the teams choosing would be scored additionally as Team Choice Elements.[28]

Windvisible[edit]

Teams had to write a story that incorporated an invisible visitor and wind energy. A team created piece of kinetic art had to be incorporated as well. Two items of the teams choosing would be scored additionally as Team Choice Elements.[29]

In Disguise[edit]

Teams had to present a story using nonverbal communication. 2 masks had to be used in the story, including one that would change in appearance. Two items of the teams choosing would be scored additionally as Team Choice Elements.[29]

Change in Realitee[edit]

Teams had 5 minutes to create a 5 minute long skit about a dramatic change in life. Teams had to use t-shirts and washable markers to create t shirts to be incorporated into their performance.[29]

Twist-O-Rama[edit]

Teams had to create a strong structure only using certain materials. At the tournament, teams would test their structure from the top and with ram impacts on the side of the structure.[28]

ROY G BIV[edit]

This challenge was a Rising Stars® challenge created for children in kindergarten through second grade.[28]

Real to Reel[edit]

This challenge was a projectOUTREACH challenge, which requires teams to perform a service project that benefits the community. A movie documenting the project had to be presented at a tournament. Teams had to incorporate a live press conference into their performance that used randomly selected questions, and team provided answers.[28]

2013-2014 Season[edit]

Dig In[edit]

Teams had to build equipment to detect hidden objects, to retrieve them, and to move them across the finish line. A story about a machine that can detect things that humans cannot also had to be presented. Two items of the teams choosing would be scored additionally as Team Choice Elements.[30]

Going to Extremes[edit]

Teams had to create a story about characters who adapt to survive in an extreme environment. A piece of extreme gear had to be incorporated into the story. Two items of the teams choosing would be scored additionally as Team Choice Elements.[30]

Laugh ART Loud[edit]

Teams had to research artists from a country other than their own, and create a comic strip representing the artist's style. The comic panels had to incorporate live characters. Additionally, a story had to be presented that utilized the comic strip panels. Two items of the teams choosing would be scored additionally as Team Choice Elements.[30]

Pandemonium![edit]

Teams had to present a five minute long skit based on material planned during a planning period beforehand. Stage makeup had to enhance one character. A character from the past and a character from the present had to interact. The difference in the character's time periods and lifestyles had to be used to solve a problem.[30]

The Tension Builds[edit]

Teams had to build a structure that could be tested simultaneously from two different forces. A prop that fit in a predetermined space had to be constructed the team's performance. A story in which tension is a problem that poses a threat to stability, and its solution. Two items of the teams choosing would be scored additionally as Team Choice Elements.[30]

Pitch and Play[edit]

This challenge was a projectOUTREACH challenge, which requires teams to perform a service project that benefits the community. An elevator pitch had to be used while presenting to a community partner. A presentation had to be given at the tournament that showcased the project.[30]

Circus![edit]

This challenge was a Rising Stars® challenge created for children in kindergarten through second grade. Teams had to create a skit about a circus, that featured a ringmaster three separate acts. In the circus, teams had to use balancing objects and geometric shapes.[30]

2014-2015 Season[edit]

The 2014-2015 Season was the first to feature the University Level challenge.

Creature Feature[edit]

This challenge called for teams to create a technical creature that performed actions that were determined by the team. A story also had to be presented that featured the creature as a character, and used technical methods to set the scene. Two Team Choice Elements were also required. These Team Choice Elements could showcase any of the team's strengths.[31]

Making Waves[edit]

Teams had to construct an "Incredible Sound Machine" that made two different sounds. Two visible sound waves had to be presented in a story that also included a change of narrative pace in the story. Two Team Choice Elements were also required. These Team Choice Elements could showcase any of the team's strengths.[31]

Feary Tales[edit]

Teams had to create a fairy tale that featured phobias and a piece of artwork that can have both physical function and abstract meaning. Additionally, an illusion that helps clarify the impossible was required. Two Team Choice Elements were also required. These Team Choice Elements could showcase any of the team's strengths.[31]

The Improv Games[edit]

Three independent improvisational sketches had to be made by the team, based on research of improv games and street performances.[31]

Lose to Win[edit]

Teams had to build separate components of a structure. Some of these components had to be removed during the presentation using a team created removal device. A story about a transformation was required, and it had to feature a prop that transforms during the presentation. Two Team Choice Elements were also required. These Team Choice Elements could showcase any of the team's strengths.[31]

Animal Mish Mash[edit]

This challenge was a Rising Stars® challenge created for children in kindergarten through second grade. Teams had to learn about animals and their habitats in order to create a new animal and its new habitat. The animal was to be constructed in 3-D in order to be presented in a skit.[31]

Brand Aid[edit]

This challenge was a projectOUTREACH challenge, which requires teams to perform a service project that benefits the community. Graphic arts had to be used to create a brand for the project. The culmination of this service learning experience was the presentation at a tournament, which ties together all aspects of the project in a presentation format. Two Team Choice Elements were also required. These Team Choice Elements could showcase any of the team's strengths.[31]

It's a Stretch[edit]

Teams in this University Level challenge could only be composed of University or College students. In this challenge, teams had to make two identical structures, one would be tested through compression and the other through compressing. Teams also had to make a presentation that features what the structure represents, as well as a demonstration of the materials and a prop that stretches during the performance.[31]

Instant Challenge[edit]

At a tournament, a team will receive an Instant Challenge and the materials with which to solve it. The team members must think on their feet by applying appropriate skills to produce a solution in a period of just 5 to 8 minutes. In a world with growing cultural connections, increased levels and types of communication, and a new need for real-time teamwork and problem solving, the ability to solve problems quickly is becoming increasingly critical. Instant Challenges are performance-based, task-based, or a combination of the two. Although each Instant Challenge has different requirements, all Instant Challenges reward teams for their teamwork. Instant Challenges are kept confidential until the day of the Tournament. Once entering the restricted Instant Challenge area, teams are directed to a holding room where they turn in paperwork, and take the Instant Challenge Promise, which states, “We promise not to talk about ANYTHING that we see, hear, do or say in this room UNTIL AFTER GLOBAL FINALS. If we are heard or are found to have shared this Challenge with anyone, we will be disqualified from the Tournament. However, we can talk about it privately among our team and Team Manager(s).” [32] After taking the promise, the team is directed to an Instant Challenge room, where they complete the Instant Challenge. Once the Instant Challenge is complete, teams are either taken to a cool down room, or released from the Instant Challenge Area. In a cool down room, teams may quietly discuss the Instant Challenge among themselves and their team manager.

Tournaments[edit]

Team solutions are assessed at a regional tournament, an affiliate (state, province or country) tournament or Global Finals. Every year, local volunteers help run over 200 Destination Imagination tournaments around the world.

At the tournament, Destination Imagination teams will solve two types of Challenges: Team Challenges and Instant Challenges. Teams will perform their Challenge solutions to a group of Appraisers. Destination Imagination Appraisers are local volunteers who have been trained to assess the Challenges.

Global Finals[edit]

Destination Imagination teams that advance past Regional and state/country (Affiliate) tournaments are invited to participate in Global Finals—the world's largest celebration of creativity. Global Finals is the culminating event of every Destination Imagination season. In May, more than 1,200 teams from 45 states, 7 Canadian provinces and 20+ countries gather to showcase their Challenge solutions. More than 15,000 people attend Global Finals to celebrate creativity and have fun. Though it is not a permanent location, it is hosted at the University of Tennessee.

Successful Participants[edit]

For the past 30 years, Destination Imagination has impacted more than 1.5 million young people who have gone on to attend top-tiered universities, receive national awards and launch successful careers in arts, science and math. Former Destination Imagination participants include Zac Efron, Glee star Chris Colfer and Olympic gold medalist Maelle Ricker.

Destination ImagiNation Affiliates[edit]

U.S. Affiliates[edit]

Canada Affiliates[edit]

International Affiliates[edit]

STEM & Literacy Pathways for Early Learners[edit]

In October 2012, Destination Imagination established the STEM & Literacy Pathways for Early Learners (Pathways) for children 3 – 6 years of age. Using fun and engaging activities for school and at home, Pathways provides children with a jump start in literacy and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (“STEM”) concepts, while promoting critical and creative thinking skills.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.destinationimagination.org/who-we-are/press-releases/di-students-do-better-in-school
  2. ^ "2013-2014 Challenge Previews". Challenge Titles. Destination ImagiNation. 2013. Retrieved 2013-04-10. 
  3. ^ "Synopses of 2011 Challenges". Challenge Titles. Destination ImagiNation Support Committee. 2011. Retrieved 2013-04-11. 
  4. ^ "Synopses of 2010 Challenges". Challenge Titles. Destination ImagiNation Support Committee. 2011. Retrieved 2013-04-11. 
  5. ^ "Synopses of 2009 Challenges". Challenge Titles. Destination ImagiNation Support Committee. 2011. Retrieved 2013-04-11. 
  6. ^ "Synopses of 2008 Challenges". Challenge Titles. Destination ImagiNation Support Committee. 2011. Retrieved 2013-04-11. 
  7. ^ "Synopses of 2007 Challenges". Challenge Titles. Destination ImagiNation Support Committee. 2011. Retrieved 2013-04-11. 
  8. ^ "Synopses of 2006 Challenges". Challenge Titles. Destination ImagiNation Support Committee. 2011. Retrieved 2013-04-11. 
  9. ^ "Synopses of 2005 Challenges". Challenge Titles. Destination ImagiNation Support Committee. 2011. Retrieved 2013-04-11. 
  10. ^ "Synopses of 2004 Challenges". Challenge Titles. Destination ImagiNation Support Committee. 2011. Retrieved 2013-04-11. 
  11. ^ "Synopses of 2003 Challenges". Challenge Titles. Destination ImagiNation Support Committee. 2011. Retrieved 2013-04-11. 
  12. ^ "Synopses of 2002 Challenges". Challenge Titles. Destination ImagiNation Support Committee. 2011. Retrieved 2013-04-11. 
  13. ^ "Synopses of 2001 Challenges". Challenge Titles. Destination ImagiNation Support Committee. 2011. Retrieved 2013-04-11. 
  14. ^ "Synopses of 2000 Challenges". Challenge Titles. Destination ImagiNation Support Committee. 2011. Retrieved 2013-04-11. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f g "Synopses of 2000 Challenges". DISC. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  16. ^ a b c d e "Synopses of 2001 Challenges". DISC. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  17. ^ a b c d e "Synopses of 2002 Challenges". DISC. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  18. ^ a b c d e f g "Synopses of 2003 Challenges". DISC. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  19. ^ a b c d e f "Synopses of 2004 Challenges". DISC. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  20. ^ a b c d e f "Synopses of 2005 Challenges". DISC. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  21. ^ a b c d e f "Synopses of 2006 Challenges". DISC. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  22. ^ a b c d e f "Synopses of 2007 Challenges". DISC. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  23. ^ a b c d e f "Synopses of 2008 Challenges". DISC. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h "Synopses of 2009 Challenges". DISC. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  25. ^ a b c d e f g "Synopses of 2010 Challenges". DISC. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  26. ^ a b c d e f g "Synopses of 2011 Challenges". DISC. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  27. ^ a b c d e f g "Synopses of 2012 Challenges". DISC. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  28. ^ a b c d "Synopses of 2013 Challenges". DISC. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  29. ^ a b c "JeffCo DI". Destination Imagination. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  30. ^ a b c d e f g "Synopses of 2014 Challenges". Destination Imagination. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h "Synopses of 2015 Challenges". Destination Imagination. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  32. ^ "Team Manager's Information". Instant Challenge Promise. New Jersey Destination ImagiNation. 2007. Retrieved 2013-03-05. 

External links[edit]