Denby High School

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Edwin Denby High School
Location12800 Kelly Road
Detroit, Michigan
Coordinates42°25′29″N 82°57′38″W / 42.42472°N 82.96056°W / 42.42472; -82.96056Coordinates: 42°25′29″N 82°57′38″W / 42.42472°N 82.96056°W / 42.42472; -82.96056
Built1930
ArchitectSmith, Hinchman & Grylls
Architectural styleArt Deco
Governing bodyLocal
NRHP Reference #04001581[1]
Added to NRHPFebruary 02, 2005
 
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Edwin Denby High School
Location12800 Kelly Road
Detroit, Michigan
Coordinates42°25′29″N 82°57′38″W / 42.42472°N 82.96056°W / 42.42472; -82.96056Coordinates: 42°25′29″N 82°57′38″W / 42.42472°N 82.96056°W / 42.42472; -82.96056
Built1930
ArchitectSmith, Hinchman & Grylls
Architectural styleArt Deco
Governing bodyLocal
NRHP Reference #04001581[1]
Added to NRHPFebruary 02, 2005

The Edwin C. Denby High School is a public secondary education facility located at 12800 Kelly Road in northeastern Detroit, Michigan. Denby High opened in 1930, and the building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005.[1]

History[edit]

Front Art Deco facade.
Tile relief decorative element at exterior portal.

The school was named for Edwin C. Denby, an attorney and former Michigan legislator. Mr. Denby also served as Secretary of the Navy, during the administration of Warren G. Harding. Denby was forced to resign his position, and narrowly avoided criminal indictment, for his role in what came to be known as the Teapot Dome scandal.

In recent years, the school is referred to as Denby Tech. It is one of few Detroit public educational institutions offering advanced placement classes to high school students.

Denby Tech's 2008-09 enrollment was 1170; the school's Principal is Kenyetta Wilbourn.

Rock & Roll and Denby High[edit]

During the late 1950s, Detroit radio personality Bud Davies originated a series of Friday night sock hops from Denby. Before long, the wildly successful dance parties spread to several metropolitan Detroit schools. Featuring records but no live bands, the hops became more popular than regular dances.

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]