Dayton, Tennessee

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Dayton, Tennessee
City
Rhea County Courthouse, 2006
Location of Dayton, Tennessee
Coordinates: 35°30′N 85°1′W / 35.500°N 85.017°W / 35.500; -85.017Coordinates: 35°30′N 85°1′W / 35.500°N 85.017°W / 35.500; -85.017
CountryUnited States
StateTennessee
CountyRhea
Settledca. 1820
Incorporated1903[1]
Named forDayton, Ohio[2]
Area
 • Total6.4 sq mi (16.5 km2)
 • Land6.1 sq mi (15.9 km2)
 • Water0.2 sq mi (0.6 km2)
Elevation696 ft (212 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total7,191
 • Density1,100/sq mi (440/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code37321
Area code(s)423
FIPS code47-19700[4]
GNIS feature ID1306293[5]
 
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Dayton, Tennessee
City
Rhea County Courthouse, 2006
Location of Dayton, Tennessee
Coordinates: 35°30′N 85°1′W / 35.500°N 85.017°W / 35.500; -85.017Coordinates: 35°30′N 85°1′W / 35.500°N 85.017°W / 35.500; -85.017
CountryUnited States
StateTennessee
CountyRhea
Settledca. 1820
Incorporated1903[1]
Named forDayton, Ohio[2]
Area
 • Total6.4 sq mi (16.5 km2)
 • Land6.1 sq mi (15.9 km2)
 • Water0.2 sq mi (0.6 km2)
Elevation696 ft (212 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total7,191
 • Density1,100/sq mi (440/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code37321
Area code(s)423
FIPS code47-19700[4]
GNIS feature ID1306293[5]

Dayton is a city and county seat in Rhea County, Tennessee, United States.[6] As of the 2010 census, the city population was 7,191.[3] The Dayton Urban Cluster, which includes developed areas adjacent to the city and extends south to Graysville, had 10,174 people in 2010.

Dayton was the site of the Scopes Trial in 1925 dealing with the creation–evolution controversy.

History[edit]

Downtown Dayton, 1925

The community was originally settled circa 1820 as Smith's Crossroads. In 1877, the town was renamed Dayton. The town was incorporated in 1903. Early industry included manufacture of pig iron.

Scopes trial[edit]

In 1925, the famous Scopes Trial was held in Dayton and, for a period of time, filled the town with hucksters of every description and journalists from around the world. The trial participants included William Jennings Bryan in the role of prosecutor and Clarence Darrow as John T. Scopes' principal defense counsel.

Although this trial is often represented as being pivotal in the movement to allow evolution to be taught in American schools, it actually marked the beginning of a major decline in the teaching of evolution which did not start to recover until the early 1960s[citation needed]. Likewise, the Butler Act, which Scopes was supposed to have violated—though it was never invoked again—remained on the books until 1967, when it was repealed by the Tennessee Legislature.

Immediately after the trial, Bryan continued to edit and deliver speeches, traveling hundreds of miles that week. On July 26, 1925, he drove from Chattanooga to Dayton to attend a church service, ate a meal, and died (the result of diabetes and fatigue) in his sleep that afternoon—just five days after the Scopes trial ended.

Author Rachel Held Evans resides in Dayton and writes about the town in the spiritual memoir Evolving in Monkey Town.

Geography[edit]

Dayton is located at 35°30′N 85°1′W (35.493, -85.013).[7] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.4 square miles (17 km2), of which, 6.1 square miles (16 km2) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2) of it (3.62%) is water.

Demographics[edit]

Historical populations
CensusPop.
1880200
18902,7191,259.5%
19002,004−26.3%
19101,991−0.6%
19201,701−14.6%
19302,00617.9%
19401,870−6.8%
19503,19170.6%
19603,5009.7%
19704,36124.6%
19805,23320.0%
19905,6718.4%
20006,1809.0%
20107,19116.4%
Est. 20127,3131.7%
Sources:[8][9]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 6,180 people, 2,323 households, and 1,558 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,007.9 people per square mile (389.3/km2). There were 2,492 housing units at an average density of 406.4 per square mile (157.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.70% White, 5.26% African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.73% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.75% from other races, and 1.31% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.12% of the population.

There were 2,323 households out of which 31.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.7% were married couples living together, 15.3% had a female householder with no male present, and 32.9% were non-families. 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the city the population was spread out with 23.5% under the age of 18, 16.0% from 18 to 24, 25.4% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 86.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $26,542, and the median income for a family was $33,149. Males had a median income of $30,521 versus $22,144 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,946. About 13.4% of families and 16.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.0% of those under age 18 and 16.6% of those age 65 or over.

Economy[edit]

Today the city is a small manufacturing center whose products include furniture, clothing, automobile parts, and air conditioners and heating units. La-Z-Boy is the largest manufacturing employer.[10] The Tennessee Valley Authority's Watts Bar and Sequoyah nuclear power plants are both within 20 miles (32 km) of the city. Since the late 1990s the area has experienced increased residential development particularly along Chickamauga Lake, an impoundment of the Tennessee River, partly due to an influx of retirees.

Education[edit]

Dayton is also home to Bryan College, a four-year Christian liberal arts school named in honor of William Jennings Bryan, who died in Dayton five days after the Scopes Trial ended. Dayton City School, a K-8 public school, is free for all residents of Dayton. Rhea Central Elementary School is the largest K-8 public school in the state. Oxford Graduate School, an institution of Christian postgraduate education, is located in Dayton's Crystal Springs community.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]