Dave Dickenson

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Dave Dickenson
Date of birth:(1973-01-11) January 11, 1973 (age 41)
Place of birth:Great Falls, Montana
Career information
Status:Retired
CFL status:International
Position(s):QB
Height:5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight:190 lb (86 kg)
College:Montana - Missoula
High school:Charles M. Russell
Organizations
As coach:
2009
2010
2011-present
Calgary Stampeders (RBC)
Calgary Stampeders (QC)
Calgary Stampeders (OC)
As player:
19972000
2001
2002
2002
2002
20032007
2008
Calgary Stampeders (CFL)
San Diego Chargers (NFL)
Seattle Seahawks (NFL)
Miami Dolphins (NFL)
Detroit Lions (NFL)
BC Lions (CFL)
Calgary Stampeders (CFL)
Career highlights and awards
CFL All-Star:2000
CFL West All-Star:2000, 2003
Awards:1995 Walter Payton Award
2000 CFL MOP
2006 Grey Cup MVP
Career stats
Playing stats at CFL.ca
Playing stats at NFL.com
 
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For those of a similar name, see David Dickinson (disambiguation).
Dave Dickenson
Date of birth:(1973-01-11) January 11, 1973 (age 41)
Place of birth:Great Falls, Montana
Career information
Status:Retired
CFL status:International
Position(s):QB
Height:5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight:190 lb (86 kg)
College:Montana - Missoula
High school:Charles M. Russell
Organizations
As coach:
2009
2010
2011-present
Calgary Stampeders (RBC)
Calgary Stampeders (QC)
Calgary Stampeders (OC)
As player:
19972000
2001
2002
2002
2002
20032007
2008
Calgary Stampeders (CFL)
San Diego Chargers (NFL)
Seattle Seahawks (NFL)
Miami Dolphins (NFL)
Detroit Lions (NFL)
BC Lions (CFL)
Calgary Stampeders (CFL)
Career highlights and awards
CFL All-Star:2000
CFL West All-Star:2000, 2003
Awards:1995 Walter Payton Award
2000 CFL MOP
2006 Grey Cup MVP
Career stats
Playing stats at CFL.ca
Playing stats at NFL.com

David Dickenson (born January 11, 1973) is a former professional Canadian football player with the Calgary Stampeders and the BC Lions. Dickenson also played quarterback collegiately at the University of Montana, where he led the Montana Grizzlies to the 1995 NCAA I-AA college football championship.

High school years[edit]

Dickenson attended Charles M. Russell High School in Great Falls, Montana, was an excellent student, and lettered in football, basketball, and golf. In football, he led his teams to two State Championships. Dickenson graduated from Charles M. Russell High School in 1991 with a 4.0 grade-point average. Dickenson's #15 jersey was soon retired by the school.

College career[edit]

Dickenson is considered by many to be the greatest quarterback ever to play for the University of Montana. He owns numerous Big Sky Conference and Montana records. By the time he graduated in 1995, Dickenson had the highest completion percentage, highest percentage of passes for a touchdown, and fewest interceptions per pass in NCAA Division I-AA history. In his college career (including playoff games) he completed 1,015 of 1,477 passes (68.7%) for 13,486 yards (12,332 m), with 116 touchdowns and only 26 interceptions, and was responsible for 137 total touchdowns (116 passing and 21 rushing).

In 1995, Dickenson's senior season, he threw for 5,676 yards (5,190 m) in fifteen games, including 1,500 in four playoff games. After leading the Grizzlies to the I-AA national championship in 1995, Dickenson won the 1995 Walter Payton Award as the outstanding offensive player in Division I-AA.

In Montana, he is known as "Super Dave" and "The Legend of the Fall." His college jersey number, #15, was retired by the University of Montana. He is one of only two players so honored. In 1999, Dickenson was listed as the 12th best Athlete to ever come out of Montana in Sports Illustrated's 50th Anniversary Issue.[1] In 2004, he was voted the most popular athlete from Montana in a Sports Illustrated poll.[2]

Professional career[edit]

Calgary Stampeders[edit]

Dickenson began his professional career with the CFL Calgary Stampeders in 1997. His best year with the Stampeders was 2000, when Dickenson led the CFL in passing efficiency (114.1) and completion percentage (64.3%). During the 2000 season, Dickenson earned Player of the Week honors once, was named a CFL All-Star, and won the CFL's Most Outstanding Player Award. He won a Grey Cup championship with Calgary in 1998.

National Football League[edit]

After generating interest from the NFL following his outstanding 2000 CFL season, Dickenson spent two seasons (2001-2002) in the National Football League. He spent the entire 2001 season as the third string QB for the San Diego Chargers, but was released by San Diego at the end of training camp in 2002 after a disappointing preseason in which he did not get to play in a game. He was then signed by the Seattle Seahawks and served as the third QB for two games before being released on September 24. In October, he signed with the Miami Dolphins following an injury to Jay Fiedler, and served as their third QB until December 3. He finished the season as the third QB for the Detroit Lions for their final two games after Joey Harrington was diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat.

BC Lions[edit]

Dickenson signed as a free agent with the BC Lions in 2003. During the 2003 season, in which he led the Lions into the playoffs with an 11-7, 4th place finish in the CFL West Division, Dickenson's 36 touchdown passes and 5,496 yards (5,026 m) were the second-highest single season marks in Lions' history behind Doug Flutie. Dickenson was named Offensive Player of the Month for August 2003, was the CFL Player of the Week in Week 5, and was awarded the Jeff Nicklin Memorial Trophy as the CFL West Division's Most Outstanding Player.

In 2004, Dickenson began the season as the Lions' starting quarterback, but gave way to backup Casey Printers after suffering a knee injury. Printers put on a dominating performance for the rest of the season, but in the West Division Final against the Saskatchewan Roughriders, was forced to leave the game with a shoulder injury in the fourth quarter, with the score tied 14-14. Dickenson, having recovered from knee surgery and shared quarterbacking duties with Printers late in the season, played the rest of the game and threw a touchdown pass in the Lions' 27-24 overtime victory.[3] Dickenson would start and play the entire Grey Cup game against the Toronto Argonauts, which the Lions lost by a score of 27-19.

Dickenson began the 2005 season embroiled in a quarterback controversy with Printers, who was named the 2004 CFL Most Outstanding Player. Dickenson emerged as the starter, and was instrumental in leading the Lions to an 11-0 start (where he played in 9 of the 11 games), en route to a 12-6 season finish. Dickenson set an all-time CFL record with a passing efficiency mark of 118.8. He fell just short of the attempts required to set a further mark with a 74.0% completion rate, due to 4 games missed because of a concussion. Dickenson was named CFL Player of the Month for both July and September, and was Player of the Week twice.

In 2006, he threw for 3,032 yards (2,772 m) and 22 touchdowns while only playing 13 games. He led the Lions to the franchise's 5th Grey Cup title on November 19, 2006 with a 25-14 win over the Montreal Alouettes. Dickenson was named the Grey Cup Most Valuable Player. Dickenson's 2007 season was interrupted early by a serious concussion received on a hit from Saskatchewan's Fred Perry. Jarious Jackson eventually led the team to another first place finish and franchise record 14 wins, but the Lions were defeated in the playoffs with a recovered Dickenson being called on to relieve Jackson. Dickenson was released from the BC Lions on November 26, 2007, after five seasons with the team.[4]

Return to Calgary[edit]

On January 31, 2008, Dickenson signed as a free agent with the Calgary Stampeders, the team where he began his professional career, lives with his family, and where his brother Craig is the special-teams co-ordinator. But this return was short lived, as post concussion symptoms returned, thus ending his long storied career in professional football.[5]

Dickenson retired from football on February 4, 2009.[6]

On May 1, 2009, Dickenson made the transition from player to coach, joining the Calgary Stampeders as an offensive assistant coach. He will mainly be responsible for coaching the running backs but will be involved in other areas of the offence. On December 9, 2010, he was promoted from quarterbacks coach to offensive coordinator.[7]

Statistics[edit]

 Passing Rushing
YearTeamGamesAttCompPctYardsTDIntRatingAttYardsAvgLongTDFumb
1997CAL18493673.540721103.04112.8502
1998CAL181137969.91,170104118.215664.42431
1999CAL1534321963.83,048161095.7302367.92515
2000CAL1849331764.34,636366114.1563095.53658
2001SD16000.00000000.0000
2002SEA2000.00000000.0000
2002MIA0000.00000000.0000
2002DET2000.00000000.0000
2003BC1854937067.45,4963612112.7443117.12127
2004BC8986263.396782114.612786.51601
2005BC1434225374.03,338215118.8492996.12431
2006BC1733823870.43,032227111.2321956.11501
2007BC8875664.47403388.39444.91300
2008CAL99555.6790085.02115.5600
CFL totals1432,4211,63567.522,91315450110.42531,5606.2361426

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ "The 50 Greatest Montana Sports Figures". SportsIllustrated.com. Retrieved 2007-11-09. 
  2. ^ Eric Francis (2004-11-22). "T.O. in sorry state". SLAM! Sports. Retrieved 2006-12-02. 
  3. ^ Canadian Press (2004-11-14). "O'Mahony kicks Lions into Grey Cup". TSN.ca. Retrieved 2006-12-02. [dead link]
  4. ^ Ron Sudlow (2007-11-26). "LIONS RELEASE DAVE DICKENSON". CFL.ca. Retrieved 2007-11-26. 
  5. ^ "Dave Dickenson returns to Calgary". cfl.ca. 2008-01-31. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "QB Great Dickenson Retires". Canadian Football League. February 4, 2009. Retrieved August 27, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Dickenson and Jones staying with Stamps". Canadian Football League. December 9, 2010. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 

External links[edit]

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Danny McManus
CFL MVP
2000
Succeeded by
Khari Jones
Preceded by
Ricky Ray
Grey Cup MVP
2006
Succeeded by
James Johnson