Cyrus S. Eaton

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Cyrus Eaton
BornCyrus Stephen Eaton
Cumberland County, Nova Scotia, Canada
DiedMay 9, 1979(1979-05-09) (aged 95)
Cleveland, Ohio, USA
NationalityCanadian
OccupationBusinessman
 
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Cyrus Eaton
BornCyrus Stephen Eaton
Cumberland County, Nova Scotia, Canada
DiedMay 9, 1979(1979-05-09) (aged 95)
Cleveland, Ohio, USA
NationalityCanadian
OccupationBusinessman

Cyrus Stephen Eaton (December 27, 1883 – May 9, 1979) was a Canadian-born American investment banker, businessman and philanthropist, with a career that spanned seventy years.

For decades one of the most powerful financiers in the American midwest, Cyrus Eaton was also a colorful and often-controversial figure. He was chiefly known for his longevity in business, for his opposition to the dominance of eastern financiers in the America of his day, for his occasionally ruthless financial manipulations, and for his outspoken criticism of United States Cold War policy. He funded and helped organize the first Pugwash Conferences on World Peace, in 1955.

Contents

Biography

Early life

Eaton was born in 1883 on a farm near the village of Pugwash in Cumberland County, Nova Scotia, Canada.[1] Besides farming, his father, Joseph Howe Eaton, ran a small general store and the district post office.[1]

Education

Eaton left Nova Scotia in 1899 to attend Woodstock College, a Baptist-affiliated prep school in Woodstock, Ontario. He then enrolled at McMaster University, a Baptist university in Toronto, Ontario, in 1901, where he studied philosophy and finance, intending to enter the Baptist ministry.[1] He earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1905 with a major in Philosophy.[1]

Cyrus Eaton in Leipzig, Germany (June 1960)

Awards

Eaton's 1950s efforts at rapprochement with the Soviet Union won him the 1960 Lenin Peace Prize. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1958, and was the recipient of an honourary degree from Bowling Green State University in 1969. The Pugwash Conferences and their Chairman, Joseph Rotblat, were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1995.

Philanthropy

Besides financial support for The Pugwash Conferences, Eaton gave a lot of money to support education in his home province, particularly to his home town and to Acadia University. He supported the establishment of a game sanctuary in Nova Scotia, and he donated 12 acres (4.9 hectares) of land in Northfield, Ohio, for the Lee Eaton Elementary School, which was named in memory of his daughter. He was also a financial supporter of McMaster University, the YWCA, the Cleveland Museum of Natural History and Case Western Reserve University.

Hyperlinks

1. ^ www.nseaton.org: Cyrus Stephen Eaton, 1883–1979 2. ^ www.nseaton.org: John Eaton 1590-1668 3. ^ www.nseaton.org: David Eaton 1729-1803 4. ^ www.nseaton.org: Amos Eaton 1785-1862 5. ^ "Book of Members, 1780-2010: Chapter E". American Academy of Arts and Sciences. http://www.amacad.org/publications/BookofMembers/ChapterE.pdf. Retrieved 7 April 2011

External links

References