Crime Investigation Australia

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Crime Investigation Australia
Crime investigation australia.jpg
GenreCrime/Factual
Presented bySteve Liebmann
Country of originAustralia
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons3
No. of episodes36
Production
Executive producer(s)Graham McNeice
Running time60 minutes; some episodes 90 minutes (including commercials)
Broadcast
Original channelCrime & Investigation Network
Nine Network
Picture format576i (SDTV)
Original runAugust 2005 – present
 
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Crime Investigation Australia
Crime investigation australia.jpg
GenreCrime/Factual
Presented bySteve Liebmann
Country of originAustralia
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons3
No. of episodes36
Production
Executive producer(s)Graham McNeice
Running time60 minutes; some episodes 90 minutes (including commercials)
Broadcast
Original channelCrime & Investigation Network
Nine Network
Picture format576i (SDTV)
Original runAugust 2005 – present

Crime Investigation Australia is an Australian true-crime series that first premiered on Foxtel's Crime & Investigation Network in August 2005.[1] The series is also rebroadcast on the Nine Network, and made its debut there on 14 August 2007.[2] The host of the series is Steve Liebmann.

Production[edit]

The series is produced by Graham McNeice Productions of Moore Park NSW. In a 2008 interview McNeice said the impetus for the series was to provide an element of local content to a channel (Foxtel) that is dominated by American and European crime stories.[3]

The series (often abbreviated to CIA) examines some of Australia's most shocking and infamous crimes. It includes interviews from victims, loved ones and the investigators who brought the criminals to justice. These crimes are further examined by re-enactments shot in the actual locations where the crimes took place.

Foxtel announced that the series would be "rested" for 2010.

Episodes[edit]

Series 1[edit]

Series 2[edit]

Series 3[edit]

Reception[edit]

The show has been generally well received, although it has not been without detractors.

Michelle Nagy in her Editorial Review of the program writes: "Crime Investigation Australia presents an impressive package, using re-enactments, montages of real evidence, locations, maps, photos and real footage – not to mention leading Australian anchor Steve Liebmann, who lends weight and integrity to the series."[4]

Similarly: "Producer Graham McNeice's Crime Investigation Australia program revisits landmark crimes that once shocked and that remain embedded in the memories of many of us. Hosted by stern, gravelly voiced Steve Liebmann, McNeice's films skilfully dramatise the stories behind these cases, though in disturbing the past he sometimes creates a sense of dismay... It's all very noir, very tabloid, and very conspiratorial. McNeice, with his just-the-facts method, unashamedly gives us criminality, violence, gritty realism, horror and psychopathology. There is no apology and no shame here, which is what makes it such riveting TV."[5]

A recent review by David Knox explains that: "True crime television is hitting us from all corners lately. Sitting at the top of the heap, at least in Australian productions, is Crime Investigation Australia. Hosted by Steve Liebmann, it shies away from emotive, sometimes even racist, sensationalism of other players. CIA has also triggered viewers to come forth with new information – surely a measure of success for any in this genre. Hopefully, this week’s case study ... will elicit the same response."[6]

Another review asks the question: "What is it about the true crime genre that's so addictive? A showcase of the worst elements of human nature should be repellent, yet so often it's darkly compelling... Crime Investigation Australia has all the hallmarks of a pay-TV documentary – lots of stock footage, dodgy re-enactments, eerie music and talking heads – but nevertheless tells an engaging tale."[7]

The re-enactments featured on the show are very often gratuitously portrayed, as for example the Anita Cobby episode in which the moment of the murder is replayed over and over again.

DVD releases[edit]

The series is currently available in four sets: Series 1 (Volumes 1–5), Series 2 (Volumes 6–10), Series 3, and Box Set (Series 1 and 2).

Series 1[edit]

Vol 1–5 DVD cover

CIA Series 1 – 5 DVD Boxed Set became available in late October 2007. Series 1's running time is approximately 670 minutes. The Set is rated MA 15+.

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Volume 4

Volume 5

Series 2[edit]

Vol 6–10 DVD cover

CIA Series 2 – 5 DVD Boxed Set is now available. Series 2's running time is approximately 250 minutes. The Set is rated MA 15+.

Volume 6

Volume 7

Volume 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Series 3[edit]

series 3 cover

CIA Series 3 – 4 DVD Boxed Set became available in early October 2011. Series 3's running time is approximately 619 minutes. The Set is rated MA 15+.

Disc 1

Disc 2

Disc 3

Disc 4

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Foxtel details programs for Summer and beyond knowfirst.info Retrieved 26 September 2009.
  2. ^ Media Releases eBroadcast.com.au Retrieved 26 September 2009.
  3. ^ QUT interview Retrieved 26 September 2009.
  4. ^ Editorial Review citysearch.com.au Retrieved 25 September 2009.
  5. ^ Review by Graeme Blundell theaustralian.news.com.au Retrieved 26 September 2009.
  6. ^ TV tonight review Retrieved 25 September 2009.
  7. ^ Editorial Review citysearch.com.au Retrieved 25 September 2009.

External links[edit]